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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted September 13, 2016 by

Sport analytics careers: 5 skills college grads should master for career success

Young businesswoman explaining graph to business team

Young businesswoman explaining graph to business team. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The field of sport analytics is growing, fast, and colleges, universities – and employers, are taking note. In fact, Syracuse University’s Falk College recently announced the development and 2017 launch of a new Bachelor of Science in Sport Analytics – the first undergraduate program of its kind in the country. The goal of the Syracuse University Sport Analytics program is to provide students with “a deep understandig of math, statistics, research methodology, sport economics, database management, finance, and computer programming integral to sport analytics. The degree also includes a mandatory foreign language requirement to prepare students for the global sport industry.”

The use of analytics in sport became popular with the release of the 2003 book Moneyball by Michael Lewis, which showed how Oakland Athletics General Manager Billy Beane used analytics, statistics, and data to assemble and develop a cash-strapped baseball team. In 2011, a movie by the same name was released, bringing the use of sport analytics to the big screen and to the attention of sports fans everywhere. Today, sports enthusiasts are focusing on sport analytica careers as a way to gain employment with the NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, WNBA, MLS, and other professional or minor league sports franchises, or businesses within the sports industry. The College Recruiter profile titled Sports analytics careers: Recent college grad discusses keys to success, provided an insight into what it takes to succeed in sport analytics careers. In addition, it’s no secret employers in all industries, in and outside the world of sports, are using analytics to recruit and hire college students and recent college grads. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the sport industry generated just under $500 billion in 2014-15 – making it the fifth largest economic sector in the U.S. economy. BLS data also revealed that jobs within the field of “data analyst” are growing at a rate of 27 percent per year – which is more than double the 11 percent national job growth average.

But when talking to Rodney Paul, a Syracuse University Sports Economics Professor and Sports Analytics Program Director who, along with Syracuse University Professor Michael Veley, researched and designed the curriculum for the Syracuse University Sport Analytics bachelor’s degree program, one thing stands out:

The focus of the program isn’t all about sports.

“To use a sports analogy, we want to develop a true 5-tool player,” says Paul. “We want graduates of our sport analytics program to be well-versed in a wide variety of core competencies relative to what is needed to succeed in a career in sport analytics.”

Those five key skills that the Syracuse University Sport analytics program will focus on include:

Mathematics: At some point, it became acceptable for high school and college students to stop challenging themselves with math, says Paul. That’s because math is hard, and requires strong analytical skills. But those who relish the challenges of math, and the analytical and critical thinking skills required to succeed in math, are on the right path to a successful career in sport analytics. “Math is difficult,” says Paul. “But the more you understand math, the more you can learn, and challenge yourself, the deeper one can dive into sport analytics.”

Computer/Information Technology Systems: Programming skills, knowing how to code, database management – proficiency in these areas and other industry technology/software programs is crucial. This is always evolving and will continue to change, but knowing the basics of key industry programs is a must. Showing one can apply these technical skills, and learn new skills/programs on an ongoing basis is going to be important for ongoing career growth.

Business Economics: A strong business acumen, and understanding of economics, and how it applies to sports is important.

Communication: Soft skills are important in the field of sport analytics. Professionals must have strong interpersonal, and communication skills to work within a team, with a diverse group of co-workers, clients, vendors, or colleagues. Being able to communicate data, analytics, and the theories behind sport analytics to co-workers, clients, prospects, senior management, and members of your team are integral to career success. This is true in any industry, sport analytics included.

Foreign Language: Sport analytics careers are available worldwide. Think about this, Paul says: The KHL (Kontinental Hockey League) is widely known as “the Russian professional hockey league.” But, in reality, the 29 teams are based in Belarus, China, Croatia, Finland, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Russia, and Slovakia, and expansion to other countries is likely. Major League Baseball has a large presence in Latin America. The NBA brand is exploding in China. The NFL is playing games in Europe. The NHL has a worldwide presence. Soccer? It always has been an international game.

“Sport industry executives repeatedly tell us that students who are bilingual are highly sought after, especially in growth areas including South America, China and India,” said Falk College Dean Diane Lyden Murphy.

The core curriculum of the Syracuse Sport Analytics program includes a focus on principles of research methodology, sport economics, database management, finance, computer mathematics, statistics and economics. Upon graduation, students will be prepared to think conceptually and analytically while applying these principles to real issues in sport organizations. The Syracuse Sport Analytics program prepares students for a variety of different possible analytics career paths on the player evaluation side, business side, or both, says Paul.

“Sports is the central part of all this and what ties students together,” says Paul, “but developing these skill sets is what is needed to launch a successful career in sport analytics.”

Sport analytics careers are growing at a rapid rate. Master these five key skills to get ahead in the fast-growing field of sport analytics. Want to learn more about trends in sport analytics careers? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Rodney Paul, Sports economist and program director for the Syracuse University Sport Analytics bachelors degree program.

Rodney Paul, Syracuse University

Rodney Paul, is a Syracuse University Sports Economics Professor and Sports Analytics Program Director who, along with Syracuse University Professor Michael Veley, researched and designed the curriculum for the Syracuse University Sport Analytics bachelor’s degree program.

Posted June 04, 2016 by

Top 10 degrees that positively impact the world

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Most young people are college-bound and want to change the world. Here are the top 10  degrees that will help you have a positive impact on the world.

1. English

BA’s in English get a lot of flak for being one of the “useless” college degrees, but as many hiring managers should be able to tell you, English majors are equipped with critical thinking and communication skills that are useful in nearly every profession. Who knows? You might write a novel that brings to light and makes people think about a serious societal issue.

2. Business

This one will only have a positive impact on the world if students don’t allow themselves to become indoctrinated into the system. The business world needs innovators who will adapt to a changing world, keep ethics in mind, and care about people as much as their profit margins.

3. History

History majors are educated to be well-rounded thinkers, researchers, observers, writers, and, best of all, they understand the implications of history and how to apply the lessons it teaches us about the modern world.

4. Environmental Studies

It is no secret that environmental issues are one of the greatest challenges of our time. If you choose to major in environmental studies, you can embark on a path that will lay one or more of these issues to rest.

5. Psychology

Psychologists save lives, literally, by listening and helping others though the most trying times of their lives.

6. Film Studies

Like many other artistic pursuits, filmmakers have the ability to reach the general public and present them with new and challenging ideas.

7. Education

Many students cite a favorite teacher as the sole reason for pursuing a certain profession because that teacher inspired them.

8. Nursing

Nurses have more hands-on experience in saving people’s lives than most other professions.

9. Economics and Mathematics

The people who know how to handle and keep track of money truly run the world. Whether you help keep a good company in the black or help people with their investments, the impact of smartly-managed money can be enormous.

10. Civil Engineering

Whether you’re designing a bridge or a skyscraper, our society would not have gotten very far without good infrastructure. Civil engineering programs prepare students to build the societies of the future.

So when choosing what you want to major in and which degrees to pursue, remember that college is not necessarily about job training. It’s about allowing students to discover their talents and themselves.

Lizzie Weakley, freelance writer

Lizzie Weakley, freelance writer

Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio, who went to college at The Ohio State University where she studied communications. She enjoys the outdoors and long walks in the park with her husky Snowball. Follow Lizzie on Twitter @LizzieWeakley and on Facebook at facebook.com/lizzie.weakley.

 

Posted March 23, 2016 by

Planning for college recruitment

Creating a college recruitment program from scratch is a daunting task. This 3-part video series featuring The WorkPlace Group (WPG) experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, provides talent acquisition leaders with suggestions and guidelines for starting their own college recruitment programs.

The video series is hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace. Part 1 provides talent acquisition professionals tips about getting started when planning a college recruitment program.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

The first place to start when planning a college recruitment program is to identify objectives for developing a college recruitment program. This helps identify internship opportunities within the organization; this transfers into considering which degrees match up with internship needs. After this, employers must consider their resources. Resources include not only budgetary items but also time, staffing hours, and travel time.

Dr. Demetriadou advises her clients to determine “what [they] need, where [they] need it, and how much [they] are willing to invest in the process.”

Part 2 helps college recruiters with the school selection process.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Once college recruiters have identified their objectives and resources, it’s time to do an environmental scan. One of the factors to consider is geography. Will staff need to travel to conduct campus recruiting visits and OCIs (on campus interviews)? Will students need to travel to visit the employer facility/headquarters?

Another factor to keep in mind is diversity, particularly in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. If the university is large, but the demographics do not offer a diverse candidate pool, recruiters may want to remove the university from the target list or consider re-prioritization.

It’s also important to consider whether it’s more beneficial to recruit nationally or regionally. It may be helpful to create a tiered list for college recruiting.

Consider the curriculum at the universities. Do they match with the available internships and entry-level jobs?

These are just a few of the factors to consider when doing an environmental scan when planning for college recruitment.

Part 3 wraps up the college recruitment planning process and discusses how to narrow down the school selection list.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Although there is no such thing as having too large a list of schools during the planning phase or beginning stages of the college recruitment planning process, Dr. Steven Lindner mentions that part of the college recruitment process is narrowing down the target list for college recruiting. He reminds viewers that there is a difference between visiting schools and recruiting from them.

In the beginning, it’s great to keep college recruiting options broad to ensure meeting objectives. However, as recruiters consider their resources, they must narrow down the target list significantly in order to work within the constraints of their budgets.

Dr. Demetriadou reminds viewers to “think big, but implement small.”

Continue reading our blog for more featured articles with The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou. For more videos and tips about the timeline for developing a great college recruitment program, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

Posted November 18, 2015 by

Big data facing big shortage of skilled workers

Have you heard the phrase do the math? That’s what North American employers are looking for; people to do the math in the field of big data. A shortage of skilled workers in the field presents job opportunities in mathematics, one of the STEM fields. (more…)

Posted May 15, 2015 by

Competitive Edge: How to Find the Degree to Fit Your Personality

Personality types word cloud on a vintage blackboard

Personality types word cloud on a vintage blackboard. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

As almost every successful person will try to tell you, finding the right career is all about matching what you plan to do to earn money with what you love and are truly passionate about. Obtaining a degree that matches your personality is the first step to a life-long career you don’t end up being bitter about later. Let’s take a look at how you can choose the best degree for your personality by matching some traits to some fields of study. (more…)

Posted October 06, 2014 by

Job Offer Rate Improves for Class of 2014 Thanks to Liberal Arts Majors

National Association of Colleges and Employers logoThere is good news for graduates in the class of 2014.  From last year to this year, the job offer rate has seen an improvement of about two percent.  Learn more in the following post.

The full-time job offer rate for graduating seniors who applied for a job has improved for the class of 2014, according to results of a new survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). (more…)

Posted June 30, 2014 by

Why studying at a singing school can be beneficial for you

Singers from the University of Exeter Soul Choir perfoming in the UK in June 2012

Singers from the University of Exeter Soul Choir perfoming in the UK in June 2012. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Many people are of the opinion that a person can only be successful if they choose a much stable career like being a doctor or an engineer or working at a bank managing accounts. While these career options are certainly more stable, a person’s choice is not limited to these basic ones. In today’s times, the options have been increased tenfold and what was considered preposterous a few years ago is being followed and taken up by several aspiring students. According to parents taking up a professional education in singing and music may not have been considered to be an ideal choice for their children but today, they have opened up more and are trying to be more accepting of their children’s choices. Formal training and education in music and singing is not just intellectually liberating but also has myriad benefits that you are unaware of. You can take a gander at some great singing schools for aspiring vocalists. (more…)

Posted April 08, 2014 by

Not every medical career needs math!

Female counselor ready to take notes

Female counselor ready to take notes. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Jobs in healthcare are predicted to keep growing over the next 20 years. People who are looking to start a new career know that field of medicine is wide open but many pass up a career in medicine because they think it is beyond their reach. Why? Well, it’s because we think of a pre-med major in college and immediately conjure up images of a geeky looking kid that can memorize and do math. Most people don’t see themselves as “smart” in that way. The point I want to make is that we associate medicine with mathematics but the truth is entirely different. In reality, there are many medical careers that don’t require math and if you’re looking to start a new career, give the healthcare industry some consideration. Think over this: (more…)

Posted August 15, 2013 by

What Significant Role a STEM Education is Playing?

The word STEM in multiple colors placed on the American flag

The word STEM in multiple colors placed on the American flag. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

STEM or Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics education has emerged to be the most important issue for any nation. In this global marketplace, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics are considered as the most important part of education. In the recent years, this program has been widely promoted and accepted too. The aim of this education system is to systematize technology into daily classroom teaching procedures and providing advanced training to the teachers. Overall, it helps to enlarge core knowledge assessment approaches. (more…)

Posted June 18, 2013 by

Intern Salaries Hold Steady for 2013

The average salaries for bachelor’s and master’s degree interns held steady this year, according to a new survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

NACE’s 2013 Internship & Co-op Survey found that the average salary for bachelor’s degree interns ticked up just 0.3 percent to $16.26 per hour from $16.21 per hour last year. (more…)