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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 09, 2016 by

Common networking mistakes to avoid

Dishonesty, moral dilemma, liar photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

As college students and recent graduates enter the workforce, they will likely meet people who can assist them with their job searches. When these opportunities arise, job seekers be prepared to take advantage of them. While some job seekers may not be the most outgoing in terms of personality, they can still be effective when networking. However, if students and grads don’t understand how to network, they can hurt their chances of building important relationships that can advance their careers. So as job seekers attend networking events, they must be mindful of what not to do. Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University, highlights common networking mistakes to avoid.

“Blindly reaching out without knowing basic information about a person, the kind of details usually found through a quick Google or LinkedIn search, is a red flag signaling a bad start to the networking experience. A wishful connection will be less likely to engage if college students or prospective hires don’t bring any background knowledge to the table.

Expecting a networking connection will “tell me what to do.” Before reaching out, know the information you want. It’s helpful to have an informal script handy. “My name is Sue Smith; I’m a business major and art history minor interested in an entry-level job working in the cosmetic industry in New York. I’m hoping to secure a summer internship. Could you share with me how you got into the industry and any suggestions or recommendations you might have?”

Thinking the number of connections matters. Networking is about relationships, not numbers. Targeted outreach to people who share common interests makes networking effective. Two people may connect in an unlimited number of ways, such as graduating from the same school, being from the same hometown, choosing a similar academic path, or by an interest in a particular career. Whatever it is, a real connection matters.

The first outreach is inappropriate or unprofessional. Treat networking opportunities as professional conversations. It’s easier to move from formal to casual than vice-versa. Having good manners and dressing appropriately (which is very different if you’re interested in a career in journalism versus a career on Wall Street) is critical in creating the first impression that builds your reputation.”

Want to learn more about networking mistakes? Head to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University

Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University

With more than 25 years of experience in the private sector, nearly half assisting organizations with recruiting, interviewing, and hiring top talent, Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, has an insider’s understanding of what employers are seeking and helping students and recent grads showcase their academic skills and personal experiences. Wake Forest’s one, university-wide employer relations team means Summers has experience with and supports the employment search for students in all academic areas, teaching and empowering them to articulate the value of their education for today’s employers.

Posted March 01, 2016 by

Keeping it old school on social media

Even in the digital age, there’s something warm and fuzzy about throwing it back to the good old days and keeping it old school when using social media. Maybe this seems ironic, but it makes a lot of sense; whether you’re searching for jobs, networking professionally, or connecting with friends, it helps to apply the same communication skills you use when interacting face to face to your online communication via social media. Recruiters and talent acquisition leaders—your future bosses—are looking for employees who exhibit great communication skills. If you can apply the following five tips to your use of social media, you’ll definitely improve your odds of landing internships and entry-level jobs.

This Tuesday Tip video, featuring Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter, offers five suggestions for college students and recent grads for using social media old school style.


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1. If you can’t show Grandma, don’t show anybody.

When using social media platforms, particularly platforms which are image-heavy like Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat, avoid posting photos (or posting comments or status updates) containing images or words you wouldn’t show or share with your grandma. If your grandma is a hipster, this rule doesn’t apply to you. Think about the stereotypical grandma who might be offended at the notion of seeing her grandson’s photos of a wild party. That’s the grandma we’re referencing here.

If that mild-mannered, conservative grandma wouldn’t want to see it or read about it, chances are your potential employers don’t want to see it or read about it either. So don’t share it on social media. Remember that just because you think you have your privacy settings locked down doesn’t mean they’re truly secure. Your friends can always tag you in photos. Facebook is publicly traded. And your friends and contacts can also take screen shots of what you post before you realize you need to delete the scandalous content. So play it safe and follow the grandma rule, particularly prior to and during your job search.

2. No phones allowed.

If you’re a traditional college student, your parents can probably tell you lots of stories about what it was like to attend parties and other college functions sans cell phones. Most wild college functions were never documented; the only records that exist of the crazy things that happened at sorority houses in the 80s and 90s live in the memories of the people who attended.

Take notes from the old folks on this one. The benefit to turning off your cell phones at the door of functions with your friends is that you won’t wind up posting any scandalous photos on social media, only to regret those posts later. It might seem fun to share the photos now, but when you begin searching for a job or internship, and employers Google you and find said photos, you’ll wish you’d followed the “no phones allowed” rule once in a while. You might want to suggest to your friends that they follow suit and turn off their phones, too. Who knows? Maybe you’ll find that you have more fun when you aren’t worried about taking selfies or being caught doing something silly.

3. Pay attention; you’re creating a brand.

When sharing, posting, liking, or communicating in any way with your contacts on social media, remember that you’re creating a brand for yourself. As The Police so aptly put it, “I’ll be watching you.” Your contacts—particularly recruiters and potential employers—are watching you. People often pay more attention to your online activity than what you might think. Be sure that you mindfully interact online and treat others with courtesy and kindness. Portray the image of yourself you want others to see. Brand yourself intentionally because if you don’t, you’re still creating a brand; it will just be a personal brand you’ve created haphazardly.

When you interact through social media, commenting thoughtfully on photos and status updates also lets your contacts know that you care about their content. This helps build genuine relationships. This is another way to apply old school communication principles to your online interactions.

4. Request a meeting with professional contacts.

After you’ve interacted with a professional contact online for a while, don’t be afraid to make the suggestion that you meet face to face, to ask for your contact’s phone number, or to request a Skype visit. Taking the next step toward more personal face-to-face interaction is always preferable because it gives you the opportunity to get to know your contact better. Professionals—whether employers or mentors—understand that you are networking in order to gain understanding about your career field and to seek job opportunities. Make your intentions clear when requesting a visit. If you are attempting to learn more about the career field, tell your contact that. If you want to learn about the company your contact works for, state that when you request to meet for coffee.

Most people are open to this type of request if they have time in their schedules. Even if they can’t meet face to face, they can often visit over the phone or online. Moving from social media, like Facebook messaging or direct messaging on Twitter, to a phone call, is a positive step toward building a lasting professional relationship.

5. “As offline, so online.”

This tip comes straight from marketing guru Samantha Hartley, owner of Enlightened Marketing. In the world of social media and electronic communication, people tend to interact more abruptly and to leave their manners at the door. This is a major faux pas if you want to maintain healthy professional relationships with your friends, professional contacts, and coworkers (and land jobs in the future).

Remember that when interacting on social media and through email, it’s just as important to treat people with courtesy, respect, and kindness as it is offline (face to face). As offline, so online.

For more Tuesday Tips and suggestions about using social media effectively in your job search, follow our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

 

Posted February 27, 2015 by

Considerations for Your Next Move (How It Can Affect Your Career)

Deborah Anderson photo

Deborah Anderson

While it is true that it is still pretty early in the school year for most college students, those finals and the last days of the school year are just around the corner. It is easy to plan out how you will address the class requirements, but sometimes the other aspects of life are missed or not given as much attention and you may find yourself “throwing it together” when faced with projects at the end of the year.

One of those areas is the dorm room or suite that you have occupied and that you won’t be needing in the summer. Even if you have already graduated (congratulations!), you may not have found that next place to live, or if you have, you may be wondering if this is your final destination. Speaking from experience, that choice of where to live can sometimes change a few times in life, especially as it relates to jobs! (more…)

Posted October 16, 2014 by

12 Writing Tips for Creating a Perfect Resume

Cari Bennette

Cari Bennette

It’s a bit of fine line, isn’t it? Knowing exactly what to put in your resume can be confusing. Too much irrelevant information will get you passed over. And not enough information may cause suspicion, as though you’re trying to hide something.

So, to compose the perfect resume, apply the following 12 tips from industry experts to ensure success. (more…)

Posted August 14, 2014 by

5 Traits Recruiters Expect of Job Candidates

Job candidates who want to impress recruiters must have these five traits in the following post.

We talk a lot about the importance of customizing resumes for each application and establishing a solid online presence. Over and over, we cover effective job search techniques and job interview best practices. In fact, as job seekers, we pretty much obsess over every little detail involved with finding meaningful work. What don’t we talk about enough? We

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Posted June 20, 2014 by

Disappointed You Didn’t Land an Entry Level Job or Internship? 12 Reasons You Came Up Short

If you did not get hired for an entry level job or an internship, the following post shares 12 reasons that could explain why.

You thought you nailed the interview – and you expected an offer. But the offer never came. The job or internship went to someone else.What went wrong? What happened that made the recruiter choose another candidate? When trying to understand how we could get so close but come up empty, we

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Posted June 17, 2014 by

College Graduates, 10 Tips to Help You Land Entry Level Jobs

New college graduates can put themselves in a great position to land entry level jobs by applying these 10 tips in the following post.

You worked hard in college, and now its time to begin your first post-graduation job. This is an exciting, and anxious, time. You’ll undoubtedly make missteps along the way. You will continue to grow and learn. And like every other major aspect of your life, in order to thrive you’ll need to learn the landscape…

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Posted June 06, 2014 by

Want Recruiters and Other People to Find You on LinkedIn? How to Market Yourself Successfully

Whether it’s job seekers looking to attract recruiters or businesses searching for new customers, using LinkedIn can be a marketing resource.  In the following post, learn some tips that can help people find success in this way.

Most people view their LinkedIn profile as a two-step process: Create an online resume then grow a virtual Rolodex of strangers. Other members – those more actively leveraging LinkedIn’s power – understand that LinkedIn offers a far more stimulating and productive online experience. These users see LinkedIn as a personal marketing catalyst…

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Posted June 04, 2014 by

Job Interview “Etiquette” is KEY to Getting Hired

Jimmy Sweeney

Jimmy Sweeney, President of CareerJimmy

Paulette remembers her mother often reviewing the importance of good manners at the dinner table. “‘Use your napkin, chew quietly, listen when another is speaking and say thank you to the cook (Mom or my older sister Beth) before leaving the table.'” Paulette smiled as she recalled the ‘rules.’ “I didn’t appreciate it much till I lived on my own and took my first job.

“Manners are not only important at the dinner table,” she added, “but also during a job interview. I’ve been on both sides of the desk and I know how annoying it is when a job candidate jingles pocket change, chews gum—even quietly, and stares over the employer’s shoulder.” (more…)

Posted May 14, 2014 by

Young Professionals, Do You Have New Recent Graduate Jobs? 5 Lessons to Be Learned

As young professionals with new recent graduate jobs, you will likely learn five lessons found in the following post.

The journey from college to career may not be perfectly seamless. Now more than ever, young professionals often experience a serious learning curve coming fresh out of college. But no matter your level of experience, your approach and attitude to that all-important first job can serve as a valuable

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