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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 04, 2013 by

Women Starting Entry Level Jobs, Watch Out for 5 Career Obstacles

The following post has five obstacles women should avoid as they start their careers with entry level jobs.

If you’re like most girls in the corporate world, you want to enjoy a career which is rewarding, challenging and gives you plenty of opportunities to grow. There are, however, a few stumbling blocks which will significantly reduce your chances of promotion and happiness at work. Here are 5 main things to keep in check. 1. Avoid Politics.

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Woman’s Guide To A Successful Career: 5 Little-Known Stumbling Blocks To Avoid

Posted May 01, 2013 by

Employees with Entry Level Jobs and Other Positions Can Return to Work with Disabilities

Just because you may have a disability, that does not mean you can’t go back to work.  In the following post, learn some tips on how to get back to your entry level job or other position more quickly than you might expect.

In the US, individuals with disabilities accounted for 9.4 million, or 6.0 percent, of the 155.9 million civilian labor force. The three most common occupations for men with disabilities were drivers/sales workers and truck drivers (246,000); janitors and building cleaners (217,000); and laborers and freight, stock, and material movers (171,000). For women,

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How Disabled Employees Can Make Their Way Back to the Workforce

Posted April 26, 2013 by

Men Earn Average of $68,300 Versus $44,400 For Women Because Highest-Paying Jobs Dominated by Men

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

For years there’s been a lot of controversy about why men tend to make far more money than women. I’ve seen a number of studies showing that the average woman makes about 75 percent of what the average man makes. Some believe that the problem — if it even is a problem — is due to women tending to choose occupational fields which pay less than the occupational fields which tend to be chosen by men. One counter argument to that is that many occupations require similar educational backgrounds, supply and demand for the labor, skill requirements, riskiness, and other such attributes and yet the occupations dominated by women are still paid less. An example I’ve often heard to illustrate this point is that skilled production line workers tend to make more than school teachers.

Whether one agrees that similar jobs should pay similarly or whether the market will somehow sort out who should be paid more, the data is clear that men tend to earn far more than women. A new study from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) underscores the continued wage gap in the U.S. On average, men earn $68,300 annually compared to $44,400 for women, and there continues to be a lower percentage of women in the nation’s highest-paying occupations. The study also shows that while women continue to lag men in leadership roles, trends are pointing in a positive direction with women being more equally represented or surpassing men in various high-skill, specialized positions. (more…)