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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 19, 2016 by

Networking isn’t all about you

Business photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

How do you handle networking opportunities? Is it a one-way or a two-way street? The mistake you can easily make is that networking is all about you. Because you’re so focused on landing an internship or an entry-level job, no one else seems to matter. Having that perspective is a mistake.

Networking is about communicating with professionals or other job seekers and building relationships with them. If you’re not just talking but taking the time to listen to someone else, you can learn valuable information to benefit your career. Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org, explains why networking isn’t all about you and offers good networking tips.

“We live in a culture obsessed with personal branding, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The problem occurs when the only thing professionals focus on is themselves. Don’t attend networking events to tell your story alone; focus on listening, as well. After all, networking should be a dialogue, not a monologue.

It all comes down to authenticity. Are you joining professional groups and meeting people to only serve your career and to be the loudest, most talkative person in the room? If so, you will get nowhere fast.

Show a genuine interest in meeting new people, sharing ideas, asking questions, and developing strong relationships. Nobody wants to associate with selfish, egotistical blowhards who try controlling every conversation.

Being authentic also requires gratitude. Many young professionals forget to thank whoever takes time to talk to them. Express how much you appreciate each person’s time and energy. This leaves them with a positive impression of you and solves another common networking mistake, which is failing to follow-up.

Most people assume their contacts will seek them out on their own. Don’t leave it to chance. Instead, be proactive, and connect online and schedule follow ups with a simple email or a request for a lunch meeting. Take charge, be humble, and maintain a level of professionalism.”

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Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org

Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org

Michael Moradian is the Executive Director of HonorSociety.org, an honor society that recognizes academic achievement and provides valuable resources and tools to its members. Connect with Michael and HonorSociety.org on Twitter at @HonorSocietyorg.

Posted July 01, 2016 by

Having lunch with new hires while onboarding

Businesswomen having conversation over lunch photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Making new hires feel comfortable is the responsibility of companies during the onboarding process. One way employers can do this is by reflecting their company values and/or culture to new employees. Companies can use the onboarding process to emphasize qualities they want all employees to represent. Armando Lopez, Executive Director of Human Resources at Ramsey Solutions, discusses why his company provides lunch on the first day to new hires.

“We welcome new teammates in such a way that it communicates part of our culture is not only being prepared, but we’re welcoming because we really want them here.

One thing we do is provide lunch on the first day. New hires may not be familiar with the area or your cafeteria if you have one. More importantly, it gives us a chance to relax, sit down together, and immerse new teammates into our company culture. At Ramsey Solutions, our Executive Director of Culture, Rick Perry,  joins us and tells stories about the company so new hires get a sense of who we are, what we are, and why we are.”

Interested in welcoming new hires to your company? Visit College Recruiter and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

 

Armando Lopez, Executive Director of Human Resources at Ramsey Solutions

Armando Lopez, Executive Director of Human Resources at Ramsey Solutions

 

Armando Lopez has been an HR professional for 23 years working at Cracker Barrel, American Blue Ribbon Holdings, and now Ramsey Solutions.

Posted May 27, 2016 by

Onboarding should focus on new hire experience

Job, new, time photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

When creating onboarding programs, employers should consider the interests of their new hires. This means focusing on what makes new hires comfortable and engaged with the onboarding process. Companies can take steps to create a smooth transition into the workplace for new employees. Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany, shares ways employers can build effective onboarding programs for new hires.

“A strong onboarding program is created with the new hire experience in mind. Many employers fail to make the first few days for employees exciting or fun. Bring people on and get them excited immediately.

Onboarding starts before new employees ever step foot in the office. So provide them with plenty of information about the company, who they’ll be meeting in the first few days, and what to expect from the entire process of getting oriented with their workspace, team, and tasks. Create an agenda before hiring employees.

Make employees feel comfortable with a clean, new space to work and introduce them to their colleagues. Encourage the staff to build casual relationships with new hires by taking them out to lunch; it establishes trust and respect. Essentially, employers are assigning mentors, employees the hires feel comfortable reaching out to.

Training should cover all of the protocols and procedures, but it needs to be engaging and can even be fun. Make it interactive; create games like scavenger hunts or other competitions to break the ice while also being informative. Technology is great for onboarding because it provides a convenient, easily accessible resource for new hires to find basic information including the dress code, benefits details, and the like, and to see how they fit within the company as a whole.

Be clear about company expectations and invest in training new hires over several weeks. This makes it easier to offer feedback, and go over the first performance evaluation. Consistent feedback and constructive critiques will help them improve on concerns as they arise, resulting in better evaluations and improving the company’s quality of hire.”

Need advice for creating an onboarding program? Get onboard our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie is the CEO of ClearCompany, the first talent alignment platform that bridges the gap between talent management and business strategy by contextualizing employees’ work around a company’s vision and goals. You can connect with him and the ClearCompany team on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Posted September 02, 2014 by

You Can Groom Yourself for Management

Successful professional wearing black suit and smiling

Successful professional wearing black suit and smiling. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Going from the rank-and-file of regular employment on to a management position is an exciting prospect, and doing so opens up major opportunities in terms of salary and your future career. If the company you work for isn’t ready to groom you for management, why not take the initiative yourself? Here are some steps to get you started: (more…)

Posted July 09, 2014 by

Are You a Recent Graduate Searching for Jobs? Networking Opportunities Could Be Right Under Your Nose

As a recent graduate searching for jobs, you never know when opportunities to network will present themselves.  The key is not missing out on them.  Learn more in the following post.

While recently flying back home from a business trip, I noticed a young man seated in the row in front of me as he had a brief conversation with a seat mate. After some quick introductions, it came out that he was looking for a job and he was working on his resume. (Yes, I

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Posted April 11, 2014 by

College Graduates, 10 Things You Need to Be Aware of When Hired for Entry Level Jobs

As college graduates transition from school to the workforce, they should understand that there will be differences between these environments.  The following post highlights 10 things new grads need to be aware of when hired for entry level jobs.

A Guide To Your First Entry-Level Job. 10 things new graduates absolutely need to know. By U.S.News. Posted Apr 4th 2014 @ 5:00AM. Share. Businesswoman looking at a businessman listening to headphones and blowing bubbles…

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Posted December 30, 2013 by

Young Professionals, About to Start Entry Level Jobs? 7 Tips to Get Off to a Good Start in the First Week

Young professionals who want to get off to a good start during the first week on their entry level jobs should consider seven tips found in the following post.

The hunt is over. Someone hand you a cocktail, because you’ve landed a job! Countless resume submissions and practice interview sessions have paid off, and you’re scheduled to start soon. The question is, when you step in the door of your new office, what can you do to make sure you stay off the job

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Posted September 19, 2013 by

Schedule Your Entry Level Job Like a Day in High School

Would you like turn your work day on an entry level job into a day in high school?  If so, the following post has tips for creating a schedule like the days when you were getting an education.

For many of us, high school feels like a distant memory. Walking down the hallways going from class to class, hanging out with your friends and dying for your lunch period to arrive. There was a set schedule, a dress code, the curriculum was decided upon by your teachers and vacations were built in before the year started. It

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Posted September 10, 2013 by

Young Professionals, Do Your Recent Graduate Jobs Require Travel? 7 Ways to Build Relationships Away from the Office

Being so busy at work may often leave you less time to connect with coworkers.  However, just because you’re away from the office, that does not mean you can’t build quality relationships.  For young professionals with recent graduate jobs and other workers, the following post has seven ways to create this time for networking.

Guest blog by Heather Townsend, co-author of ‘How to make partner and still have a life’ and author of ‘FT Guide To Business Networking’, and guest blogger for Big4.com. One of the most memorable quotes from the interviews I did for ‘How to make partner and still have a life’ was this one from Antoinette Oglethorpe: “From

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Posted August 30, 2013 by

Young Professionals, Have You Been Working for a While? Eliminate These 6 Habits from Your Recent College Graduate Jobs

In the workplace, you might tend to do some things that could harm your career.  The following post includes six habits for young professionals to eliminate on their recent college graduate jobs.

Dreaming of the fastest way to advance in your career? The time it takes to pull up to a drive-thru window and order a large fry is how fast we want to go from intern to CEO. We’ve got places to go and success to obtain. The ambitious gear needs to be in overdrive to

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