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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 17, 2014 by

Study Shows No Difference in Work Quality Between Short- and Long-Term Unemployed

Peter Weddle

Peter Weddle of Weddle’s

One of the joys of being an owner of a niche job board is knowing that every day we’re helping thousands of people find rewarding careers. But sometimes it is easy to forget that many of those people have been trying to find a job for a much longer period of time than others.

It used to be assumed by virtually all that those who are out-of-work are unemployed because they don’t perform as well on-the-job as those who are employed. And if that’s true, then it must also be true that those who have been unemployed for a long period of time must not perform as well as those who have been unemployed for only a short period of time. So the longer you’ve been out-of-work, the less likely it is that you’ll perform well if hired and therefore the less likely it is that you’ll get hired.

As reported today by WEDDLE’s, an experiment run by researchers at the University of Toronto, the University of Chicago, and McGill University demonstrated that there is  a bias against first-time applicants with lengthy periods of unemployment. “Researchers at the three schools submitted 12,000 fake resumes for about 3,000 jobs, and found that those with eight months of unemployment were 45 percent less likely to be called for an interview as those with just one month out of work.”

Now a bias against a certain group of people isn’t always a bad thing. Let’s say that you’re a lipstick manufacturer and you want to hire a model for your television ad. You should be biased against hiring dudes like me as males are far less likely to purchase or use lipstick than are females. Could the bias against the long-term unemployed also be justified? Some would argue yes based upon their perception that the quality of the work performed by the long-term unemployed isn’t as good as those who have been unemployed only for short periods of time. That argument sounds reasonable except that it fails because it simply isn’t true that the quality of work differs amongst the two groups. (more…)

Posted June 11, 2013 by

Returnships — Internships for Experienced Workers — May Be Good for Employer and Employee

The Internship MovieThe new movie The Internship, coming out today and starring Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson as obsolete salesmen trying to maintain relevancy in the digital world, identifies an important opportunity for job seekers and hiring authorities. As job seekers struggle to update their skill sets or close an employment gap, and hiring authorities face labor shortages, both sides may benefit from “returnships:” internships for older professionals, returning mothers, transitioning military, and the long-term unemployed, according to one employment expert.

“Employers are consistently wary of employment gaps brought on by a layoff, parenthood, or some other life event that prohibits working. A ‘returnship’ for former or transitioning professionals with otherwise sterling employment records, but prolonged unemployment, solves this issue,” said John A. Challenger, chief executive officer of global outplacement and business coaching consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. (more…)

Posted May 03, 2013 by

Job Growth Beats Expectations by Adding 165,000 Jobs; Unemployment Falls to 7.5%

Bureau of Labor StatisticsFinally some good news out of Washington, D.C. Although the consensus amongst economists was that we were due for a poor monthly job report, the numbers released today by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics were actually decent. Not great, but definitely not poor as those of us who watch these numbers were expecting.

The U.S. economy added 165,000 jobs in April 2013. That beat by some 17,000 the consensus 148,000 gain expected by economists. Even better, the economy added 114,000 more jobs in February and March than had previously been reported. It isn’t unusual for the Bureau to revise up or down the estimates for the previous months but it is always nice when those revisions are higher than lower. With the revisions, job growth in the first quarter totaled 618,000. That’s just slightly behind the 208,000 monthly average during all of last year.

Interestingly, once again the austerity measures in place at the federal and especially state and local government units held back job growth. Private companies added 176,000 jobs, which means that the government shed 11,000 jobs. Given that the percentage of workers employed by federal, state, and local government units is 7.84 percent, the percentage of workers employed by private businesses is 92.16 percent. If the government were creating jobs at the same rate as private industry, the government would have added 14,972 jobs in April and that would have made the April job gains a very healthy 190,972. (more…)

Posted April 18, 2013 by

4.6 Million Americans Searching for Jobs for 27 or More Weeks

John Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas

John Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas

June will mark the four-year anniversary of the official end of the Great Recession and, unless there is a significant shock to the economy, it will be the 40th consecutive month of private-sector payroll gains. Yet, millions of chronically unemployed Americans the job market have yet to see any improvement; a trend that could have dire consequences for the long-term health of the entire economy, according to one employment authority.

“The longer one is out of work, the more difficult it becomes to achieve job search success. And, unfortunately, this is a situation that has not reversed, despite steady improvement in the overall job market,” said John A. Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., the global outplacement firm, which provides employment transition counseling to individuals following job loss. (more…)

Posted March 08, 2013 by

Economy Added 236,000 Jobs Despite Expectations of Only 160,000

Bureau of Labor StatisticsThe U.S. economy added 236,000 jobs in February. According to the Wall Street Journal, economists had forecast that payrolls would rise by 160,000 and the unemployment rate would fall to 7.8 percent. In related news,  the unemployment rate fell two-tenths of a percentage point to 7.7 percent, the lowest level since the end of 2008.

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 236,000 in February, and the unemployment rate edged down to 7.7 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment increased in professional and business services, construction, and health care. (more…)

Posted November 02, 2012 by

Employment Report Blows Away Estimates; Aug & Sep Revised Upward Too

Bureau of Labor StatisticsThe consensus of economic forecasts for today’s payroll report was that in October the U.S. would have added about 125,000 jobs and that the unemployment would slightly increase from 7.8 to 7.9 percent due to an increase in the number of people in the labor force. The unemployment rate announced today by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics was the same as forecast, but the total number of jobs created was almost 37 percent higher as 171,000 net, new jobs were created in October. Further bolstering the strength of the report was that BLS also announced that some 84,000 more net, new jobs were created in August and September than previously estimated.

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 171,000 in October, and the unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 7.9 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment rose in professional and business services, health care, and retail trade.

Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy had no discernible effect on the employment and unemployment data for October. Household survey data collection was completed before the storm, and establishment survey data collection rates were within normal ranges nationally and for the affected areas.

Household Survey Data

Both the unemployment rate (7.9 percent) and the number of unemployed persons (12.3 million) were essentially unchanged in October, following declines in September. (more…)

Posted September 07, 2012 by

96,000 Jobs Added in August; Unemployment Falls to 8.1%

Bureau of Labor StatisticsTotal nonfarm payroll employment rose by 96,000 in August, and the unemployment rate edged down to 8.1 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment increased in food services and drinking places, in professional and technical services, and in health care.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the 96,000 net new jobs in August was fewer than the 125,000 gain forecast by economists. The unemployment rate, obtained by a separate survey of U.S. households, fell to 8.1 percent from 8.3 percent as the number of people looking for jobs shrank. Private sector employment by corporations accounted for all of the growth in payrolls as they added 103,000 jobs. Payroll numbers for the prior two months were revised lower: July payrolls rose 141,000 compared with the initially reported 163,000, while June’s gain was 45,000 instead of 64,000 new jobs.

Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate edged down in August to 8.1 percent. Since the beginning of this year, the rate has held in a narrow range of 8.1 to 8.3 percent. The number of unemployed persons, at 12.5 million, was little changed in August.
(more…)