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Posted April 02, 2016 by

How to avoid 5 common study slip-ups

Female college student studying in a library courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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Highly effective students know how to study. They pace themselves and don’t save all of their studying for the last minute. They also know how to take notes along the way to make their studying more efficient. Cramming and other last-minute study techniques can leave them exhausted, and incapable of performing well on test day. Use these ideas to improve your study system, and get a better grade this time around.

1. Avoid cramming

If you absolutely have to cram before a test, try to take breaks. Sleep is important for learning, so find a few hours to sleep after a long study session, and you’ll be better able to think clearly during the test. Research shows the first sleep cycle lasts about three hours. After that, we dip in and out every one and a half hours. Try to sleep from three to four and a half hours before your test.

2. Create a habit

Studying at the same time every day allows students to study better for their tests and make time for important assignments. Pick a time when you are unlikely to be disturbed and aim for the same time each day. You’ll get a better study session, and your brain will start to become used to your study routine.

3. Study locations

The place where students study is important. If they find they study best in the library, they should make a habit of getting out of their dorms or apartments, and getting to the library first thing. Make home a safe place from school work, and find places outside of it to work hard and for preparation. This way, home can become a place to relax, unwind, and have some fun.

4. Set specific goals

If you’re working toward a master’s in higher education, your goals should be specific and relate not only to your coursework, but your future career. Create lesson plans to start building the skills to become a teacher. Conduct mock lectures when teaching the material you’re learning in school to an imaginary classroom. This will not only show what you haven’t learned, but will prepare you to become a more effective educator. The same goes if you plan to intern as a scientist in the lab or research assistant. Come up with appropriate scenarios and hands-on study that prepare you for your future career and still help you learn the material.

5. Don’t procrastinate

Treat studying like a job. The most important thing to remember is students don’t have to be in the mood for studying. Studying is a process, and they may have some good days and some bad days. It’s okay to have a bad study session. Don’t let your mood affect whether you’re going to study. Push through and make your habits stick, and the rest is easy.

If you’re going for a long study session, start with the most difficult subjects first. Move on to the easier subjects when fatigue becomes a factor. Remember to take frequent breaks, and eat foods high in protein and carbs to sustain your energy levels and to prevent dips in energy.

If you’re looking for more study tips, go to the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Brooke Chaplan

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Posted June 29, 2015 by

Heading to College: 6 things to Consider to Enhance your Education Experience

Closeup of a personal calendar setting an important date representing a time schedule. The words Start University written on a white notebook to remind you an important appointment.

Closeup of a personal calendar setting an important date representing a time schedule. The words Start University written on a white notebook to remind you an important appointment. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

According to a recent National Student Clearinghouse report, only 40 percent of college students finish their degree from start to finish while another 30 percent drop out. Getting a college education has lifelong benefits for your personal life and career. Below explains six different ways that will enhance your educational experience and help you succeed at college. (more…)

Posted May 08, 2015 by

Why You May Want to Consider Earning Your Degree Online: Personal Perspective of a Doctoral Candidate

Deborah Anderson photo

Deborah Anderson

Years ago, when you stated that you were going to earn a degree online, it was not surprising to have someone respond with a question of whether or not the degree is legitimate. Or, worse yet, were you “purchasing” the degree (which obviously isn’t a degree at all).

Nowadays, it is not unusual to have online opportunities to earn a degree, from the Bachelors, to Graduate School with the Masters and even the Doctorate. There are respectable schools from the known-for-online, like University of Phoenix and Capella University, to the brick-and-mortar schools. Yes, even the state universities have arrived and have opportunities for people to go to school “online.” (more…)

Posted January 29, 2015 by

How to Prepare for the Start of the College Year

Happy female college student. Isolated on white background

Happy female college student. Isolated on white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Whether you’re a returning student or about to embark on your freshman year of education, how you prepare before the academic year starts can have a big impact on your productivity throughout the term. Below you’ll find three tips for helping you get ready to go back to school. (more…)

Posted October 28, 2014 by

How to Learn More Spending Less Time

Melissa Burns

Melissa Burns

If there is a question that every student asks himself at least from time to time, it is this: how am I supposed to do so much in so short a time? People behind the curriculum often seem to believe that students possess nigh superhuman abilities when it comes to acquiring and processing new information and performing assignments. It is, of course, flattering, but the question remains: how to deal with such a load?

Luckily for you, there are some ways to do it: some age-old, some brand-new. (more…)

Posted February 20, 2014 by

Where Are the Entry Level Jobs for Librarians?

Graduates looking to find entry level jobs for librarians may find doing so a challenging experience, according to the following post.

After graduating from my MLS program a few years ago I faced a dilemma familiar to many other aspiring librarians: how does one land an entry level job in such a competitive market? From browsing job announcements it…

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Posted January 28, 2014 by

Seeking Career Advancement from Your Entry Level Job? Improve Your Skill Set

Would you like to advance from your entry level job?  If so, then improving your skills is a good idea.  Learn some ways to do so in the following post.

A job seeker commented about doing very well at the job interview; then, apparently, performing poorly on a test of her skills specific to a software package required for the job. She isn’t alone; this scenario plays out far too often…

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Posted December 26, 2013 by

Want to Shine During Interviews for Entry Level Jobs? Share a Story

How can job candidates standout during their interviews for entry level jobs?  Sharing a story might be the key, according to the following post.

You know the basics of interviewing: dress appropriately, show your positive attitude, and come prepared to convince your interviewer that you want this job. But what steps should you take to prepare answers to interview questions? What strategies can help leave the interviewer with a lasting impression that she needs to hire you for your skills? The job interview

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Posted November 13, 2013 by

College Students, GPA is not Most Important Factor for Entry Level Job Search. 5 Factors to Focus On

While earning an impressive GPA doesn’t hurt their consideration for an entry level job, college students should know that it is not the most important factor.  Learn five factors they need to focus on for job search success in the following post.

Here’s the deal: contrary to what you’ve been told your whole academic life… straight A’s don’t pay off. Your college GPA is to some degree important for your future—no employer wants to hire a D student. But if you’re tempted to spend all four years of college glued to the library for that perfect

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Posted July 19, 2013 by

Interested in a New Entry Level Job and Career? 4 Questions to Answer Before Going Back to School

There is nothing wrong with going back to school, if it’s what you really want to do.  If you do desire landing a new entry level job and pursuing a different career, the following post has four questions for you to answer to determine if a return to school is worth it.

Here are three truths: One, it’s still a miserable economy, and the competition for sought-after jobs has risen to bloodsport levels of cruelty. Two, when we’re 18, most of us have a pretty lousy sense of self-knowledge and limited wisdom about what careers actually entail and how to build one. Three, grad school

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4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Go Back to School to Change Careers