ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 13, 2018 by

Build your leadership skills as an entry-level employee: Interview with Cy Wakeman

 

As an entry-level employee who wants to grow professionally, you hear constantly that you must build your leadership skills. What does that even mean, and how do you know you’re building the right leadership skills? I interviewed Cy Wakeman, an international speaker on leadership and management, and President and Founder of Cy Wakeman, Inc. She has a fantastic and authentic philosophy of leadership, and I’ve shared major takeaways from our interview below, including what not to learn from your manager, how to request and handle feedback, and tips for women.  (more…)

Posted December 05, 2017 by

STEM grads, want a promotion at work? Intel recruiter gives advice for advancing your career

 

Do you know how long should you expect to stay in your entry-level role before looking to move up? Campus Relations Manager Jeff Dunn, at Intel Corp., has advice for you. From years of experience recruiting and developing entry-level employees, Dunn has seen patterns. We checked in to get his advice about what skills STEM grads typically need to develop before they’re ready to get a promotion at work, and what mistakes he sees them make.

Read Dunn’s advice here, or watch our discussion at the end of this blog post.

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Man and woman - a job interview or business meeting. Male student came to the office to get a job. HR Manager conducts the first interview. Agree on. Discuss the possibilities of business cooperation. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted January 03, 2017 by

Key managerial skills recent college grads should master to be successful

 

To become a manager, one must show an employer they possess a wide variety of skills. Leadership skills are crucial. So is the ability to communicate, handle adversity, and deal with diverse personalities and skill sets.

A first-time manager must also develop strong critical thinking, analytical, and problem-solving skills to be successful, says Sylvia R.J. Scott, Founder of Girls’ C.E.O. Connection™ (Girl’s Creating Enterprising Organizations), a for-profit social enterprise dedicated to engaging and equipping high school girls as entrepreneurs. They also must show the company can trust them, which is why they were hired as a manager.

“A manager is the one with the ability to plan, direct and coordinate the operations of a business, division, department or operations,” says Scott. “To be a first-time manager as a recent graduate shows the company trusts the person and believes in his or hers capabilities and ability to help grow the company.”

In February Scott is speaking to a group of college women, primarily seniors, at the University of Colorado, about what it takes for first-time managers to succeed. She will focus on these eight skills, traits and attributes of a successful first-time manager:

  1. Know and understand your company culture.
  2. Know the parameters of your particular position. That includes how much leeway you have on decision making.
  3. Ask questions and get clarity even if you think you understand. As a manager you don’t have time for you and/or your staff to make mistakes.
  4. Expect the best-not perfection from your staff. Praise them when it is appropriate. If there are issues face them immediately.
  5. Learn each person’s strengths and weaknesses. Play on their strengths, not their weaknesses.
  6. Control your emotions, tongue, and actions. Avoid gossip, even after hours or with colleagues. Take a break if someone is pushing your buttons. Watch the tone of your emails when responding to challenges, and watch the tone of your voice.
  7. Always use proper English, grammar and spelling when writing any type of communication, even an email. They need to be as clearly written as any other business communication.
  8. Find a mentor within the company and then one outside your company that knows the ropes of being a manager and what is needed to excel.

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Four happy college graduates standing in a row. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted December 27, 2016 by

10 strategies December college graduates should follow for job search success

 

As 2016 comes to a close many college students have now handed in their final paper, taken the last exam of their collegiate careers and entered the job market. But according to a study of 503 entry-level job seekers by national career matchmaking firm GradStaff, recent college grads seem largely unaware of career opportunities and unsure of how to apply their skills in the workforce.  So what strategies can December college grads put into action now to create results that land a job? Start by following these 10 strategies for success.

1. Develop a strong value proposition: Start by developing a strong value proposition and identifying those important soft and transferrable skills, says Bob LaBombard, CEO of GradStaff, a company that serves as a career matchmaker for recent college graduates, and companies that are looking to fill entry-level jobs.

“These soft skills – such as critical thinking, effective communication, time management and leadership – are in high demand among prospective employers,” says LaBombard. “Grads should consider how and where they’ve applied these skills during college, whether in classes or extracurricular activities, or in non-professional jobs, including restaurant and retail service positions.”

2. Sell what you want to do next: Next, be prepared to talk about what it is you want to do now that you are graduated.  Everyone that you know, run into, or talk to, is going to congratulate you on graduating, then ask “what’s next?” or “what do you want to do now?” The “I’ll take anything” approach is not a good option, says Kathleen I. Powell, Associate Vice President for Career Development at The College of William & Mary, and President, National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). Case in point, if you tell someone you’ll take anything, it’s hard for that person to find “anything.”

But…

“If you tell someone you’re interested in arts management, accounting, psychology, now you’ve given that person an area to focus on and they can start thinking of contacts in their networks,” says Powell.

3. Casual conversations can lead to opportunities: Don’t blow off those casual conversations with friends, family members – that wacky uncle just may be well-connected in an industry where you want to work and be able to point you to a job opening, a mentor, or someone with whom you can set up an informational interview. Members of your church, social networks, parents of high school friends, relatives of your significant other, when they ask “what’s next” they are generally interested – so be prepared to effectively sell your excitement of what you want to do next. That’s the only way they can possibly help you, by knowing what you truly want to do.

4. Network, network, network: Because, it really is about networking. Recent ADP employment reports show the bulk of all new job growth – often as much as 70-80 percent in a given month – is driven by small and mid-sized businesses. “These companies often don’t have the resources to recruit on campus, and tend to rely on referrals from employees, clients, vendors and other partners to identify candidates,” says LaBombard. “As a result, personal networking is critical. All entry-level job seekers should seize opportunities to ask parents, teachers, friends, clergy and even former employers for connections in industries of interest, and they should continue engaging with professional associations, alumni groups and others for face-to-face networking opportunities.”

LaBombard offers these additional tips:

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Two women having a job interview. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted December 20, 2016 by

6 rules for women who want to become corporate leaders

Many recent college grads head into the job search just hoping to land that first job to start their career. Others graduate from college with a clear goal in mind: To become a corporate leader, company president, CEO, or major industry influencer.

If the latter fits your career aspirations, and you are a female seeking to climb the corporate ladder to career success, then follow the lead from Melissa Greenwell, author of Money On The Table: How to Increase Profits Through Gender-Balanced Leadership (Greenleaf Book Group, January 2017).  Greenwell is Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of national retailer The Finish Line, Inc., and a certified executive coach who helps women and men understand how they can leverage natural strengths to identify and make behavioral changes that help them succeed as senior leaders.

Greenwell’s book, Money on the Table, includes several stories from women who didn’t follow a corporate path and leveraged their passion and leadership skills to build their own businesses.

“When you are someone that others follow or look to for help, you will stand out from the crowd,” says Greenwell. “You won’t need to push your way through.”

To get started on the path to career success, and to become an influential female leader, follow these tips and advice from Greenwell:

1. Be the best team player one can be: The first thing a recent grad should do, beyond mastering their subject matter, is to learn how to be the best team player they can be. Help others, volunteer for assignments, and make the extra effort to move projects or initiatives forward that will enable the organization to be successful. “When leaders see you working for the good of the organization, they will notice,” says Greenwell. “This is the behavior they want to see in their future leaders.” Pay close attention to the best leaders in the organization. Ask one to mentor you. Make it known that you want to earn a position in leadership. (more…)

Posted November 20, 2015 by

North American employers looking for leaders

Employers in North America are searching for job candidates who possess leadership skills, even when hiring for entry-level positions. While research suggests the need for leadership in the workplace, employers are learning it is not easy to find in every pool of candidates. (more…)

Posted August 05, 2015 by

Create a Cover Letter That “Does You Proud”

Jimmy Sweeney

Jimmy Sweeney, President of CareerJimmy

Rhonda sat down at her desk to draft a cover letter for a job she really wanted—director of a preschool. She had recently completed the training for Preschool Director Certification and had five years of experience working in two different schools as a teacher. Now she was eager to move into a position with more responsibility and opportunity.

She stared at a picture of her grandfather on her desk. He had died just months before but his words still rang true for her. He was someone she looked up to all her life. In fact, his influence prompted her to work with young children so she could pass on to others the love and care she’d received from him.

“You’ve done me proud,” he’d said with a big smile when she received her credential. (more…)

Posted July 08, 2015 by

Want a Promotion? 5 Tips to Help You Earn One

Do you believe it is time for you to get promoted at work?  If you have been with a company for a while and have proven your worth, then chances are you are probably right.  You may have even asked your boss for a promotion before, but for some reason it was not the right time.  That does not mean you should give up.  If your goal is to move up within your business, there are ways to do it.  Here are some tips to help you earn a promotion. (more…)

Posted June 05, 2015 by

How to use the secret language of job postings to supercharge your resume, cover letter and interview

 

Job postings have a secret language all their own and understanding this can supercharge both resume and cover letter, plus your performance at job interviews.

There are half a dozen keywords and phrases that you see in almost every job posting. These words and phrases are so commonly used that most people say they are meaningless – that you could put any job title on top of them. These people are missing the point. Far from being pointless, these words represent a secret language that most job hunters never grasp but should include in their job application. Those that elaborate on these keywords and phrases are the ones who get the job offers and the subsequently promotions that help them achieve far greater levels of long-term success.  (more…)

Posted April 17, 2015 by

Advantages of Greek Life in Your Post-Grad Career

Pi Kappa Alpha Greek House, Florida International University, Miami FL

Pi Kappa Alpha Greek House, Florida International University, Miami FL. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

More than nine million college students wear Greek letters as members of Greek chapters today. Whether they join to build their resumes or make friends, Greek life can change the students’ lives after graduation for the better. Greek life has become a key point of success for students after they leave campus. Studies show that Greek students have a 10% higher success rate than the non-Greek students. So why exactly do students involved in Greek life feel more prepared to enter the real world upon graduation? (more…)