• Diversity recruitment lessons from law enforcement: Inside the research

    March 06, 2017 by

     

    College Recruiter is introducing a regular feature called “Inside the research”. We will dive into recent research that can be applied to practitioners in recruitment, HR and talent acquisition. 

    Policing and race relations are topics of national interest these days. A study from the Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice1 looked at how several law enforcement agencies market their opportunities to communities of color, and their success in diversity recruitment. Drawing a parallel between police and corporate recruitment highlights just how much effort recruiters must put into hiring diversity. That is, if you want results. Here are six lessons that recruiters can glean from this study.

    Understand that institutional racism is around us. “Police agencies have been criticized for what is perceived as institutional racism in the recruitment, retention and promotion of Blacks and other racial minorities,” write the authors of the study, titled “Recruiting for Diversity in Law Enforcement: An Evaluation of Practices Used by State and Local Agencies.” While police have been in the hot seat, recruiters of all sectors and industries must turn the mirror upon themselves. Many would agree that institutional racism exists in business across the board.

    Put your money where your mouth is. The authors write, “Today’s typical police recruitment campaign is managed almost exclusively using advertisements in those news publications that cater to the greater (White) community at large.” As a recruiter you might be thinking, but we advertise across many different channels, including Facebook, which is very diverse! That may be true, but try doing a little exercise. Compare all the places where you advertise, and how much money you spend on each channel, to your recruitment goals. If you have a goal around diversity, you have to put your advertising dollars where your mouth is.

    Police agencies desperately want to hire diversity, precisely because they know they have a trust problem with communities of color, particularly the African American community. The study points out what should be common sense: “When citizens see that a police department has personnel who reflect a cross-section of the community, they have greater confidence that police offers will understand their problems and concerns” (Streit, 2001). The study found, however, that these agencies are just not putting their money where their mouths are. There are points of contact in the community where recruiters may connect with more of their targeted candidates—churches, hair salons, shopping malls, for example—and yet the agencies studied here did not take advantage these opportunities.

    Be aware of hypocrisy. Companies who include diversity in their core values, and especially companies who flaunt their inclusive environments, would be wise to check their authenticity. The study reminds us of what we already know about policing: “when community partnerships are seen as being superficial, agencies risk alienating candidates who might be aware of hypocrisy where such activities are inconsistent with reality.” (Syrett & Lammiman, 2004). You should communicate your commitment to diversity, but just saying it doesn’t make it so. Effective diversity recruitment makes it so. Continue Reading

  • Looking for Recent College Graduate Jobs? You May Want to Use Social Media

    August 27, 2013 by

    For young people in search of recent college graduate jobs, they may benefit from using social media.  The following post includes an infographic showing the impact this form of networking has had in our society, including the job search.

    Social Media has changed how business is done and the future of work and business depends largely on how we leverage it in near future. The game is changing and those who adopt and learn fast from the new trends are the ones who will benefit most from these winds of change. Quoting

    Read article here:

    Continue Reading

  • Turn Around Slowly and Assume the Search for Entry-Level Law Enforcement Jobs (in New Jersey)

    August 24, 2006 by

    A job in law enforcement is not for the ill at heart, and now that I’ve decided you are not (humor me)…let’s find you a nice entry-level law enforcement job—in the New Jersey area no less.
    Start with the New Jersey Department of Personnel (NJDOP) and you will find that every entry-level law enforcement job seeker must apply for, and pass, the Law Enforcement Exam (LEE). There is also a training course offered to prepare for this examination (LEEP—the P is for “preparation”).
    Okay, once all you entry-level law enforcement people are qualified, start looking at sites specifically tailored for the New Jersey area. I suggest flipdog.com, which has a list of jobs and career resources (provided by monster.com) and all those other nice job helping tools. If you decided that New Jersey is not where you want to be, well, other cities are listed there too, just for your convenience. You can also check out smarthunt.com to see what turns up there.
    To keep up with all your law-enforcement news and events go to NJLawman.com, which provides news and headlines for the New Jersey area, as well as links leading to the LEE and LEEP as well. It’s a plethora of law enforcement fun. Check out the links and enforce the law!
    NJDOP:
    http://www.state.nj.us/personnel/public_safety/entry-level_opps.htm
    FlipDog:
    http://www.flipdog.com/jobs/new-jersey/law-enforcement/
    Smart Hunt:
    http://www.smarthunt.com/smart-job-listing.cfm?state=NJ&catid=33
    Resources:
    http://www.njlawman.com/index.htm
    http://www.njlawman.com/Links%20Page.htm

© 2017 CollegeRecruiter.com, LLC