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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 04, 2016 by

Top 10 LinkedIn tips

Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College & award-winning social media consultant

Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College & award-winning social  media consultant specializing in LinkedIn

 

Whether you’re a novice LinkedIn user or a pro, it never hurts to learn more about how to better utilize LinkedIn to network online, particularly while conducting a job search. Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College and award-winning social media consultant, public speaker, and freelance writer, offers the College Recruiter audience his top 10 LinkedIn tips over the next two weeks in a series of short YouTube videos hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace.

College students, recent graduates, and other job seekers will benefit from the easy-to-follow tips Shapiro offers in his videos. Shapiro discusses the following topics:

1. Introduction to LinkedIn profiles and background photo selection

2. Name, profile photo, and headline

3. Vanity URL and public profile settings

4. Contact information on LinkedIn

5. Rich media content

6. Skills and endorsements

7. Alumni feature

8. Advanced search feature

9. Contact relationship management

10. How to search connections

Stay tuned over the next two weeks as we post one tip per day on our blog and YouTube. Each video is only 2-4 minutes long and provides you with easy-to-implement tips to improve your online networking and job searching strategies.

Follow College Recruiter’s blog for links to Chaim’s top 10 LinkedIn tip videos and accompanying articles and follow us on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Chaim Shapiro, M.Ed. is the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant specializing in LinkedIn. He has presented his popular LinkedIn Workshop at National Conferences, Universities, Public Libraries and for communal organizations across the country. Chaim earned a Master’s Degree in College Student Personnel from Loyola University, Chicago, and also studied in the Institutional Leadership and Policy Studies Ph.D. program at the University of California, Riverside Graduate School of Education. He has more than 12 years of experience working in college administration.

 

Posted January 21, 2016 by

Recruiters’ quick tips for job seekers

Laura Schnaible, Recruiting Specialist, The New England Center for Children, Inc.

Laura Schnaible, Recruiting Specialist, The New England Center for Children, Inc.

When preparing to enter the workforce after college graduation, and when preparing for internship application season, many students appreciate pointers from true experts. Two members of the recruiting team from the New England Center for Children (NECC), Laura Schnaible, Recruiting Specialist, and Kaitlyn Maloney, Human Resources Coordinator, share some of their top tips for soon-to-be grads and internship candidates preparing for the job search process.

What are your 3 top tips for new college graduates about how to prepare for the job search process in January if they plan to graduate in May? 

  1. Students should have an updated current resume targeting specific fields/industries, if they are able to research organizations ahead of time and have a specific one for that company.
  2. Dress appropriately for colleges fairs, interviews, etc.  Lean more on the conservative side.
  3. Make use of career services at your college/university. They can help direct you when it comes to resumes, career events, job opportunities, and the appropriate ways to follow up with potential employers.

If students want to work for The New England Center for Children as a summer intern, when should they apply? Please describe the application process. 

Our internship program is very competitive, and we strongly recommend applying in January or prior within the fall semester, since an on-site interview is required.  It is important to review the position information, and to reach out to the internship coordinator with your contact information and resume.

Have you hired an intern who later became a star employee? Please share your internship success story with us. 

Kaitlyn Maloney, Human Resources Coordinator-Recruiting, The New England Center for Children, Inc.

Kaitlyn Maloney, Human Resources Coordinator-Recruiting, The New England Center for Children, Inc.

We have hired many full and part-time interns as employees. We pride ourselves on being a company that promotes within, and we have had numerous interns turn into staff who grow into supervisory positions, complete on-site Master’s programs, and truly become leaders at the organization.

For more tips from recruiting experts, follow College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. Stick with College Recruiter this month as we help you connect the dots on your path to career success.

In 2007, like most employees at The New England Center for Children (NECC®), Kaitlyn and Laura began their careers as teachers in the residential program for students who have a moderate to severe diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder.  Kaitlyn received her undergraduate degree in Criminal Justice and Psychology at Westfield State University, and Laura attended Valparaiso University, receiving her degree in Business Administration and Psychology.  During their years at NECC, both have taken advantage of the significant graduate school tuition reimbursement benefit; Kaitlyn received her Master’s of Education with a concentration in Mental Health Counseling from Cambridge College, and Laura received her Master’s of Science in Education with a concentration in Severe Special Needs from Simmons College (one of NECC’s on-site graduate programs).  After working in the residential program, and at NECC’s second school facility in Abu Dhabi, Kaitlyn joined the Human Resources Recruitment Department in 2014 as a Human Resources Coordinator, and has the main focus of creating relationships with numerous college and university programs within the Northeast.  Laura has been in the Recruiting Specialist role for seven years and focuses on building long-reaching partnerships with programs throughout the United States and Canada.  Both work daily meeting college students in person and guiding them toward the many internship and career opportunities at NECC.

For those interested in learning more about internships, career opportunities, and the numerous benefits NECC offers, please visit www.necc.org.

 

Posted January 13, 2016 by

4 secrets to job search success

Erin Vickers

Erin Vickers, Staffing Consultant, RightSourcing, Inc.

It’s tough to begin searching for your first full-time job as a college student, having worked as an intern, volunteer, or in part-time positions in the past. Transitioning to full-time job status is huge, and the interim evolutionary phase feels odd at times and requires some changes on your part.

Expert staffing consulting Erin Vickers offers 4 helpful tips to ease the transition and aid the job search process.

Establish your brand and keep it professional.

Make sure you are reflecting your professional self. Search for your name online and see what comes back in the results. After all, you are selling yourself to potential employers, and you should present your best self. Keep your social media pages (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.) free from questionable posts and images.

Create a professional email address if you do not already have one. Email addresses are free and easy to establish so there’s no excuse for not having one for professional interaction. Employers don’t want to message “foxymama@thisemail.com” or “hotdaddy@thatemail.com.”

Remove questionable greetings, ringtones, ringback tones, etc., from your phone. Choose a standard voicemail greeting stating your full name, requesting callers to leave a message.

Do not be a no call, no show to an interview whether it’s over the phone or in person. Period.

Employers understand that other opportunities present themselves and are not offended (though maybe disappointed) when they hear “no” for whatever reason. Politely call or email your contact to let the company know you will not be attending the previously scheduled interview. You do not need to go into great detail about why you are canceling your appointment, but you do need to let your interviewer know you will not be there and thank them for their time and consideration.

Remember the STAR or PAR acronym while giving answers in an interview.

STAR stands for Situation/Task, Action, Result, while PAR stands for Problem, Action, Result. Many interviewers will ask you to “tell them about a time when….”  By integrating the STAR/PAR acronyms, you will be able to respond with a complete answer: you should describe a situation, task, or problem you faced, detail the action you took when resolving it, and then tell what resulted from your actions.

Use and grow your network

Andresr/Shutterstock.com

Andresr/Shutterstock.com

You want to do X.  You know or know of someone who does X.  Make the connection and see what transpires. Perhaps the connection will lead to a job, but it could also potentially become a mentor/mentee relationship that will assist with career guidance in your quest for a job or better job.  Also, having a LinkedIn profile connects you to a world of people with roles similar to the one you are probably seeking. Send a terse yet somewhat personal message to those with whom you want to connect: e.g. Hi ___, Looks like we have this person, group, skill, etc. in common.  I’d like to connect with you.

Want more secrets to connecting the dots on your path to career success? Follow College Recruiter on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter or start searching for jobs on our website today.

Erin Vickers, Staffing Consultant at RightSourcing, Inc., has spent more than 16 years in various recruiting roles in a variety of industries. Her experience includes full-lifecycle recruiting for nationally-known telecommunications carriers and a third-party administrator. Additionally, she has supported several staffing initiatives for an international chemical company and a widely-renowned insurance company. She has placed candidates in accounting, engineering, executive, financial, marketing, and other professional positions as well as various customer service and technician-type roles. As a Staffing Consultant, she has piloted an on-site recruiting program in support of an exclusive client’s needs.  Her passion is to strategically assist her client in operating an efficient organization by providing top talent.  Erin graduated from Lyon College (Batesville, AR) with a Bachelor of Arts degree in French. In her spare time, she enjoys listening to live music, traveling, and spending time with her two spoiled rescue dogs.

 

Posted November 04, 2015 by

Numbers that matter most in your job search

The numbers that matter most in your job search, part three of a webinar series by Amanda Augustine, provides college students, graduates, and entry-level job seekers with powerful statistics, facts, and figures to help them develop an effective job-search strategy.

This three-part webinar series features Amanda Augustine (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jobsearchamanda), Career Management Expert who helps recent college graduates and accomplished professionals reach their full career potential. The webinar is moderated by Andrea McEwen-Henderson (https://www.linkedin.com/in/andreamcewen), former National Account Manager for College Recruiter.

Key takeaways:

  • Make sure what employers read about you online is consistent with whom they meet in person and read about on your resume. Take steps to secure your personal online accounts and flesh out your professional profiles.
  • Research a company thoroughly so you have a good sense of company culture before setting foot in the interview room.
  • If you find a job online you’re interested in, apply sooner rather than later. In the world of job seeking, early applicants are more likely to land jobs.
  • Don’t apply to a job without first checking to see if you know someone who works or used to work at that company. An employee referral can make all the difference in your job search.
  • Your resume only gets six seconds to make the right impression with a potential employer. Make sure your resume is crafted to capture attention.
  • Never rely on only one source for job leads—diversify.

If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Questions:

  1. How do I “secure” my personal brand?

If you are posting information for your personal brand and not for your professional brand, use separate profile photos. Use separate screen names as well; this way, your personal profile will not appear in searches conducted using your legal or professional name.

  1. Networking seems to be important for the job search. How can I expand my network?

Everyone has a network already, whether they realize it or not. Begin by cultivating the network you already have. Do an advanced search on LinkedIn, for example. When you’re ready to expand, take advantage of opportunities to connect with people with similar interests.

  1. What are some ways I can learn about a company’s company culture?

Job seeking and dating are very similar. Think about ways you might scope out a first date! Peruse company websites, “about us” sections, and social media sites. There’s a huge transparency trend today in many companies’ cultures; use this to your advantage as a job applicant.

  1. How do I make sure my resume passes the 6­-second test?

When crafting your resume, don’t just write a recipe. Think about tailoring your resume to the specific job you’re applying for, considering which specific skills are applicable to that position.

Amanda Augustine is a Career Management Expert who helps recent college graduates and accomplished professionals reach their full career potential. Her goal is to get professionals into the right jobs sooner through personalized job search and career guidance. Amanda offers consulting, speaking engagements, and training sessions to all professionals ready to advance their careers. Follow Amanda on Twitter at https://twitter.com/JobSearchAmanda, on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/jobsearchamanda, at http://www.jobsearchamanda.com/, or on The Ladders.com at http://www.TheLadders.com/AskAmanda.

Posted September 03, 2014 by

Are You Willing to Put in 8 Hours to Land an Entry Level Job?

While landing a new entry level job may take some time, putting in eight hours of work in your job search just might make a difference.  Learn more from an infographic in the following post.

If you knew that eight hours from now you could be much closer to a brand new job… how long would it take you to get started? According to this infographic created by LocalWork.com, by making the right changes to your jobs search tools and strategy, you can be much more employable with

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Posted January 29, 2014 by

Want a Winning Strategy When Searching for Recent College Graduate Jobs? 5 Tips that Can Make a Difference

If you’re looking for a new strategy when searching for recent college graduate jobs, the following post offers one, along with five tips to boost your job search.

Whatever your job search situation, you’ll have much better results if you focus your energy on what will get real results… rather than sporadically applying to every job you find and hoping for the best. Check out these 5 tips to help you craft a better job search strategy that works to help you find a job faster…

Originally posted here:

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Posted December 10, 2013 by

What to Consider for a Successful Entry Level Job Search

The following post offers a few suggestions for conducting a successful entry level job search.

“My daughter sends out 5 applications online every day, and then has a melt-down on Friday about how bad the job market is!” Does this sound familiar to your job search? If so, let’s talk about the job search for recent grads. Here’s a couple of things that are really important to know.

Source:

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Posted November 19, 2013 by

Applying to Jobs for Recent College Graduates? The More You Apply, The More You Could Learn

Have you considered applying to many jobs for recent college graduates?  It may help you learn more about the job search in the process, according to the following post.

My strategy for my job search during my last semester was pretty simple: apply for every job that I was even remotely qualified for. While not always the easy road, I learned a lot along the way. Here are some of the lessons learned that college students can use in their own job

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Posted February 17, 2012 by

How Career Coaches Help Job Seekers

Laura Labovich of Aspire! Empower! Career Strategy GroupEach month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) publishes an Economic News Release outlining the duration-of-unemployment in the United States. As of February 3rd, 2012, the numbers indicate that longer than six month job searches still prevail. According to the survey, in January 19.3 percent of job seekers found work in less than 5 weeks; 22.4 percent in 5 to 14 weeks; 15.4 percent in 15 to 26 weeks; and the majority, 42.9 percent, found that their job search extended past 27 weeks.

According to Laura M. Labovich, founder of Aspire! Empower! Career Strategy Group, a DC-based career firm, “As a job seeker, getting expert career advice at the onset of a search is critical, and can shorten the duration of unemployment in the long run.” (more…)