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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 01, 2019 by

Job Search Tips to Help You Find the Right Opportunity

While there may be more job openings than qualified applicants, that doesn’t mean finding the right opportunity is easy. In fact, searching for a job is hard work! And, like any task, it requires some “best practices” to get good results. Here are some tips to help you make the most of your job search.

Broaden your scope.

Instead of simply looking at specific job titles, take the time to look at the skills the company is seeking in a candidate. Job titles can differ among industries and organizations, so why limit yourself to a title. Matching your skill set to those required for a position can ensure a better fit and provide more options including some that you may not have considered.

Decide what is non-negotiable.

More is not always better. You could send out as many applications as possible and hope for the best, or you could narrow your search to positions and companies that offer a good fit. Finding a good fit includes knowing what you’re unwilling to accept. Make a list of things that are deal breakers. For instance, you may not be able to relocate due to family obligations. How far are you willing to commute each day? Are flexible hours a nicety or a necessity? Is a positive corporate culture high on your priority list? In other words, do some research before sending out applications and start with those companies that fit the bill.

Keep good records.

Being organized can help you in several ways. First, even if you receive a rejection, there could be another opportunity at this company in the future. Or, there may be something about the job description that really resonates with you and could lead you in a new direction. Second, if you do get an interview, you will want to refer back to the job listing to prepare. Finally, if you receive specific feedback from a company, it may help you change tactics, revise your resume or improve your cover letter.

Customize your cover letter and resume.

Jobs are not one size fits all. Just as you’re looking for a job that fits you, every company is looking for the “right” candidate with specific experience, skills and personality. With that in mind, be sure to tailor your cover letter and resume for each position you apply to, highlighting the experience and skills that the employer is seeking. Also, if you’re working off a form letter or template, be sure to double check that all the names are correct before sending it!

Prepare for the interview.

Don’t just show up. Remember, you’re trying to set yourself apart from other candidates, so come prepared with information about the industry, the company, the position, and if possible, the person you are interviewing with. Doing your homework will not only make you feel more confident, it will also demonstrate your enthusiasm for the job and your willingness to go the extra mile.

Have questions ready.

Most people will wrap up an interview by asking the candidate if he/she has questions about the company or position. A surprising number of interviewees don’t come prepared with questions and fumble needlessly to think of something to ask (especially when you may already be nervous). Stand out from the pack by preparing a few thoughtful questions in advance. This is also a great opportunity to learn more about the company, it’s culture and the position. For some great questions to consider, read “8 Questions Job Seekers Should Ask.” https://www.collegerecruiter.com/blog/2019/07/01/8-interview-questions-job-seekers-should-ask/

Don’t forget to respond.

Manners matter! Always send a thank you note within a day or two of your interview. Make sure it reflects your enthusiasm about the position by sharing why you’re excited about the company and the job. To keep the conversation going, you can ask another pertinent question. Also, it’s a good idea to let some of your personality shine through instead of sending a standard, formal thank you note. After all, you want them to remember you!

(This article was adapted from “10 Job Search Tips to Help You Find Your Best Opportunity Every Time, by Nina Zipkin, Entrepreneur, 2010.)

College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduates.

Posted April 06, 2018 by

What to do with my degree: Entry-level communications jobs and salaries

 

The biggest misconception about majoring in Communications is that it’s a fluff major, or it’s for students who don’t really want to study. In reality, though, the field of communications – which encompasses public relations, marketing, mass communication, journalism, and advertising – is a versatile major that opens the door to a wide variety of careers. It’s not a fluff choice; it can be a very smart choice. Here we dive into entry-level communications jobs and the salaries you can expect. (more…)

Posted November 27, 2017 by

What to do with my degree: Biology jobs and salaries

 

Biology is one of the most popular college majors. What kinds of biology jobs are out there for you? We heard from Dr. Jeffrey S. Heilveil, who chairs the Biology Department at SUNY College at Oneonta. He has observed Biology students over the years, and has deep insight into what their options are, and where their strengths and weaknesses are. We’ve quoted his insight below. (more…)

Posted July 26, 2017 by

Take a vacation to deal with burnout

 

Burnout is more than a catchy word. If you haven’t been in the workforce long, let’s hope you haven’t actually experienced burnout. There are real symptoms to watch out for, and if any of these sound familiar, you are due to take a vacation. Expert career coach Joanne Meehl of Joanne Meehl Career Services, and member of our Panel of Experts, advises her clients to watch for “a severe imbalance.” The symptoms of burnout that she has seen are “frustration out of proportion to the problem at hand, a drying up of creativity and increasing reliance on ‘the way it’s been done here before’, increasing isolation or rejection of the team, and micromanaging for control.”

Sound familiar? Time to take a vacation, and we’ll get to that. If not, we recommend you preempt the burnout and make sure your work doesn’t take over your life.  (more…)

Posted September 10, 2014 by

Are You a Recent Graduate Who Wants to Build Connections While Searching for Jobs? 20 Networking Tips to Practice

As a recent graduate searching for jobs, making connections with other people can help you.  Try practicing these 20 networking tips found in the following post.

Regardless of how much emphasis there is on the importance of networking, people tend to overlook its value. Especially when you’re not looking for a job or you’ve landed a job out of pure luck, you may think networking isn’t worth your time. Well, here’s a reality check for you: Networking is the

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Posted September 09, 2014 by

New Grads, Interviewing for Entry Level Jobs? Don’t Make These 12 Mistakes

Once they have landed interviews for entry level jobs, new graduates should avoid making these 12 mistakes in the following post.

So much work just to get the job interview, let alone the job. The research, the resume writing, the applications, the networking, the follow-up… And then some job seekers throw it all away by making these common, and completely avoidable, mistakes…

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Posted September 08, 2014 by

Searching for Entry Level Jobs? 10 Words You Should Not Use in Your Job Search

For people searching for entry level jobs, make sure you’re careful of the language you use.  Learn 10 words not to use for your job search in the following post.

Imagine you’ve found the job of your dreams. You tailored your cover letter and resume perfectly. Your application was impeccable. The phone rings. An interview! You do all the right research. You prepare all the right answers, and questions. Your dress is perfectly aligned with the culture. You nailed it! After the interview, however: weeks go by and

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Posted September 02, 2014 by

Are You a Recent Graduate Searching Jobs? Don’t be These Kinds of Job Seekers

If you’re a recent graduate searching jobs, make sure you don’t hurt your chances by becoming any of these job seekers shown from an infographic in the following post.

Job searching is difficult at best. And the longer we’re looking for work, the more frustrated – and perhaps desperate – we become. We can rationalize asking before giving. We start talking in cliches instead of clearly stating our value proposition. And somehow, the bad kind of stalking becomes okay…

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Posted August 26, 2014 by

Have Phone Interviews for Jobs, Recent College Graduates? Succeed with These 10 Tips

Recent college graduates who interview for jobs by phone should absorb these 10 tips for success from an infographic in the following post.

The dreaded phone interview. It makes our hands wet, our throats dry, and causes all kinds of anxiety. And yet, with more and more employers using phone interviews (or their video counterparts via Skype, G+ Hangouts and Zoom) to help choose which candidates will be invited in for a face-to-face interview, it is

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Posted August 26, 2014 by

5 Mistakes to Be Wary of in Your Entry Level Job Search

Finding an entry level job takes some work, so you don’t want to be careless in your job search.  Here are five mistakes to be careful of in the following post.

From time to time job seekers discuss with me the difficulties they face in finding a job, or getting interviews. Most times I empathize with these individuals because the job search process can take a toll on anyone; people get into panic mode, and all rational thinking goes through the window. And mistakes are made, like these:

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