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Posted August 11, 2016 by

3 events employers won’t want to miss on college campuses

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Recruiters and hiring managers are constantly searching for top talent to fill job openings for employers. A lot of the talent employers need and want can potentially be found on college campuses. Recruiting on campus means taking time from their busy schedules unless employers reach out to companies like College Recruiter for help with creative advertising solutions. If companies decide to visit institutions of higher education face-to-face, what are the most important events for them to attend? For employers pondering this issue, Jennifer Donovan, Director of News and Media Relations at Michigan Technological University, shares three events recruiters and talent acquisition professionals should attend on her campus.

  • Fall and Spring Career Fairs, where thousands of students can meet employers, learn about their companies and career opportunities, and schedule one-on-one interviews with recruiters on the spot.  More than 500 employers attend Michigan Tech’s Career Fairs each year. This is pretty impressive, considering that we are about as remote as you can get, 500 miles north of Detroit and near no other big cities. Our dynamic Career Fairs probably account for Michigan Tech’s astounding 94 percent job placement rate within 6 months of graduation.
  • CareerFest/Industry Days, a series of industry-specific events in a tent in the middle of campus, including hands-on activities, demos, barbecues, lab tours. A very popular and well-attended one is Automotive Days. Others include Steel Days, Rail Days and Mining Days. CareerFest and Industry Days give employers a chance to zero in on the students who are particularly interested in their industry, to inform them and perhaps attract new interest in the field.
  • Design Expo, where student teams display and explain their year-long research projects, ranging from a micro-scale processor that can fix pacemakers in place to a dryer for small-scale hops growers. The projects are industry-sponsored and give the students a chance to work across disciplinary lines to solve real-world employer problems. Employers attending Design Expo could see what innovative problem-solvers Michigan Tech students are trained to be.”
Jennifer Donovan, Director of News & Media Relations at Michigan Technological University

Jennifer Donovan, Director of News & Media Relations at Michigan Technological University

Looking for more advice on recruiting top talent? Visit the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Jennifer Donovan is Director of News and Media Relations at Michigan Technological University, a STEM-focused state university on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. She assigns, writes, and edits stories for the university’s news website and daily e-newsletter, Tech Today, and works with news media locally, nationally, and internationally to help them find expert sources and story ideas. In a previous life, she was a newspaper reporter and magazine writer. She lives in Houghton, Michigan, with her two cats.

 

Posted April 29, 2016 by

20 ways to rock your resume

Resume with pen on table closeup courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Casper1774 Studio/Shutterstock.com

Another week without attention paid to your resume. You are applying for jobs that match your education and skills; you have a nicely formatted document; and you have outlined your work experience very well with bolded headings and bullet points like you were told to do. You’re qualified but just can’t manage to get that call for an interview. Could there be that many people more qualified than you? Maybe not. There may be some flaws in your resume you have not realized.

Here are 20 tips that can improve your resume.

Make sure you are emphasizing results, not responsibilities

It’s a common error; job seekers are trying very hard to list all of their responsibilities for each position. Their thinking, of course, is the more responsibilities, the more qualified they will be. What is more important to employers is the results, what job seekers have actually accomplished.

Take a look at the responsibilities you have listed for each position. Can you list any quantifiable results? Did your re-organization save the department $50,000 a year? Sometimes, you may think results will be hard to provide. For example, perhaps you took over a department that had no baseline data to work with to show improvement. And maybe the improvement was qualitative rather than quantitative. Take employee morale, for instance. You know you improved it when you took over that department. But how was the improvement measured? Maybe there was much lower turnover or maybe the rate of absenteeism dropped significantly. These are important figures to have. Never leave a position without gathering figures that support your results.

A lot of space was spent on this item. Why? Because it is the one thing employers say is usually missing from a resume.

Target skills/background for each position

This is the primary reason why you need to tweak each resume for every job opening. If you have background in training, administration, HR, and sales/sales management, and are applying for jobs that focus on one of those, then focus your resume in that direction. Spend far more space on that focus area than on others. Generic resumes don’t really work anymore.

Re-visit keywords for each position

Change out your keywords based upon two things: the job description and the company’s website. Sometimes, reading through the company’s home page and the “about us” page will give you more keywords to include. And keywords that relate to the position should be placed as close to the top of the resume as possible and included in your cover letter.

Include a summary section

A statement of your career goals at the beginning of your resume is not advisable. Companies don’t care about your goals; they care about what you “bring to the table.” Switch that out for a short summary of your skills and experience that relate to the position, with four to five sentences only.

Use standard software

Microsoft Word or a PDF version of your resume should be the only programs used to submit resumes. Scanning will probably not recognize any other programs, and you will never know your resume was unreadable.

Business woman unhappy with resumes of applicants and throwing them on the table courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Milles Studio/Shutterstock.com

Aim for one page

Edit, edit, edit. Take out anything superfluous, reduce sentences to phrases, and remove some of your contact information. Employers don’t need your address and don’t include references unless specifically asked to do so. If you are able to edit the resume to one page, that is ideal. But NEVER go beyond two pages unless you are preparing a CV.

Do not lie

Not about anything. Of course, you want to try to avoid resume mistakes, and of course you want to present yourself in the best light. Exaggerating or giving yourself a job title you did not actually have are big risks. These things can be discovered when references and/or social media are reviewed. Focus on your skills and qualifications completely but honestly.

Use action verbs

They are so much stronger. If you don’t know the difference, here is an example:

1. Responsible for implementing budget reduction by 10% without loss of productivity

2. Reduced budget by 10% without loss of productivity

The second phrase is strong and active. (P.S.: Never use “I”)

Visual appeal is a must

You’ve seen enough resume templates to understand what visual appeal is. The best font now is probably Arial, 12-14 point. The reason for this is there’s good, natural spacing between lines that are not complete and enough white space between bulleted points. Your final resume should have sub-headings in bold (e.g., each position), and a larger font to separate sections of the document. The goal is to make it scannable, not just by a computer program (applicant tracking systems), but by humans, too. No one wants to search for your information.

Be clear about job titles

So long as you are not exaggerating, use a job title that will make clear what you did at a previous organization. Sometimes, organizations have internal titles that mean nothing on the outside. So, if you were a “Level II Tech Support,” change that out to “Systems Analyst,” if that was what your position really entailed.

Be really brief

Do not use full sentences unless you are crafting a CV (These are prose documents). Brief phrases only, please. Remember – scannable.

Perfect grammar and spelling

Don’t rely only on grammar and spell-check programs. They will not recognize incorrect numbers or words that are wrong but are still words. And, in some instances misspellings will not be caught either. If you are really good in this area, read your resume backwards, and you will catch misspellings; read it forward line-by-line. If you are not highly skilled, get someone who is.

Avoid gimmicks

Having your resume hand-delivered by FedEx or courier is not appreciated, and, in fact, is a bit of a turnoff. Just don’t do it. Submit your resume according to the instructions on the job posting.

Graphics should fit the company culture

It is more acceptable today to use some color and graphics than in the past, but these resumes are best suited for younger, more progressive organizations. Tailor color and graphics based upon the culture of the company. If you are not sure, check the website. As a general rule, banks, financial, and educational/scientific institutions are conservative; tech and marketing companies are more progressive. For creative positions, graphics are certainly suitable.

Never state salary

Never include past salaries in your work experience. And absolutely never include your salary or benefit requirements for a new position. Epic fail if you do.

Don’t address negatives

If you were fired or laid off, never state this in your resume. That is the stuff for discussion during an interview. And don’t lie about it either; be as honest as possible, and never “trash” a former boss or company.

Add links

Long before submitting resumes, it will be important to have a professional online presence. Include the link to your LinkedIn profile and, if warranted, a website with a portfolio of your work and/or accomplishments. If you have been a guest blogger on relevant sites, provide links to those posts too.

Update consistently

It is often advised when you start a new position, you begin updating your resume. This is because you want to be sure to remember all of your accomplishments if and when you decide to make another career move, or if, for any reason, your employment is terminated (companies do close). Keep your resume updated all the time.

No tag lines

Lines such as “References available upon request,” are not necessary and just take up space. Leave them out. If you are asked for references or links to things during an interview, you can provide them at that time.

Do not abbreviate

The only abbreviation you can use is “U.S.” Otherwise, spell everything out. Even abbreviations for schools attended may not be known by employers. The rule for acronyms is the same; spell them out.

This article provides a good checklist for job seekers, whether they are crafting their first resumes ever or if they are veterans with several previous resumes under their belts. Sometimes, it’s the little things that can make a difference.

Need assistance with your resume for your job search? Get a free resume critique on College Recruiter. Also, come to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Kerry Creaswood, guest writer

Kerry Creaswood, guest writer

Kerry Creaswood is a young and ambitious writer from Savannah, Georgia. She is fond of various forms of art and thinks everything we can imagine is real. To find more about Kerry, check her Twitter.

Posted December 21, 2015 by

Hiring via social media: 7 advantages recruiters should consider

business man touching be social word on blue virtual screen

Business man touching Be Social word on blue virtual screen. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

It doesn’t matter the size of your company or the type of industry you are in, success and growth depends on successful recruiting. You have many options available when it comes to sourcing talent. You can outsource the process to recruiters and staffing firms, you can hire directly by placing advertisements on various job sites and newspapers, and you can use social media to find quality candidates. If you haven’t been using social media in the recruitment process, now is the time to consider it. Chances are you will find it to be a beneficial part of your overall recruiting strategy. If you are unsure if your organization will benefit from social media recruiting, here are seven advantages to consider. (more…)

Posted July 16, 2015 by

Preparing for a Job in the Computer Science Industry

Deborah Anderson photo

Deborah Anderson

It is tricky finding a job anytime, but especially in this economy (which goes back to the crash in 2008). Fortunately, straight out of college, with no experience, graduates will find that the going is a bit easier than those with experience.

Why is that? As you gain experience, it sometimes becomes trickier because companies prefer the lower salaries (easier on their budgets) of educated, but inexperienced employees. Understanding that, as you start on your career path, helps you in the long run. (more…)

Posted April 24, 2015 by

5 Reasons to Pursue a Health Information Management Degree

Health Information Management

Health Information Management. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Pursuing a health information management degree is ideal if you are looking to pursue a career in the healthcare industry. The degree can prepare graduates to become well versed in health data management, health information services, and health information management. It is an excellent field to pursue if you like the idea of working in the healthcare industry but are not inclined to work directly with people.

Graduates are qualified to seek employment in numerous levels of healthcare and may interact with numerous other healthcare professions. Your education can lead to an excellent career, which can be far more than just a paycheck. The following five reasons are why many have chosen to pursue a health information management degree. (more…)

Posted March 17, 2015 by

Peak Performance: How to Fuel Your Career in Sports Nutrition

Two young nutritionists posing in a gym - one with an apple and one with weights

Two young nutritionists posing in a gym – one with an apple and one with weights. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Most nutritionists help people choose the right foods for basic health. A sports nutritionist creates eating and supplement regimens that help athletes achieve peak performance. Because so many individual pro athletes are incorporating nutritional strategies into their training, the demand for sports nutritionists is growing. In fact, job openings for dietitians and nutritionists are expected to grow 21 percent over the next 10 years. (more…)

Posted March 05, 2015 by

Avoid These 10 Mistakes and Land Your Dream Job

Sarah Landrum photo

Sarah Landrum

After you graduate, the real fun begins; and by fun I mean work. Let me rephrase that: After you graduate is when the real effort begins. All of the energy leading up to the fireworks of graduation quickly fades, and then it’s time to land a job.

Of course, you’re not looking for any job. You want to land your dream job.

Working toward your goal of landing that perfect job isn’t going to come without some effort. While the days and weeks after graduation might seem like the perfect time to relax and revel in the glory of all you’ve accomplished, quite the opposite is true.

Now is the time to buckle down and go confidently toward the career you worked so hard to achieve. To help bring your plans to fruition, avoid these 10 mistakes. After all, landing your dream job depends on it. (more…)

Posted February 02, 2015 by

Interested in a Fast Growing Career? Try Your Hand in the Affordable Web Hosting Industry

Web design concept: computer keyboard with word Web Hosting on enter button, 3d render

Web design concept: computer keyboard with word Web Hosting on enter button, 3d render. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If numbers do not lie as sages of yore proclaimed then the future of society is in computing technology. A Forrester Research report says there are 2.92 billion internet users while another by 2015 International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) reckons there is creation of 571 websites every minute of each day.

Best Career Choice

Whether you are in business or you want to interact socially, information technology has revolutionized the way you do it. This is where websites and blogs have come in so handy. If you are looking for the ideal career choice, this should be your first stop. The computing world provides a very broad area with multiple fields of specialization. (more…)

Posted January 30, 2015 by

Classroom to Career: Six Steps You Must Take to Get a Rewarding Job

Woman searching newspaper classified ads

Woman searching newspaper classified ads. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

With many students working hard towards getting their degree, some don’t anticipate how difficult it may be to find a job, even with an education. As college grads enter the workforce, they may accept another position until the right one comes along. Following these six steps can help you find a rewarding job after college: (more…)

Posted January 19, 2015 by

Really Simple Tips To Help You Increase The Possibility Of Getting A Job After College

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

College is great but there comes a time when you need to start looking for a job. Contrary to what you may believe, the sooner, the better! The problem is that there are many that struggle with getting a job as a college degree is no longer a certainty that you will be hired. You have to prepare early.

Luckily, there are various ways in which you can increase the possibility of getting a job after you finish college. The advice offered below is really easy to remember and can drastically increase the chances of being hired. (more…)