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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 08, 2016 by

Is a college degree worth it for Millennials?

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

In today’s global, competitive workforce—where Millennials are the largest generation to date—jobs are tough to find and competition is more than 10 times worse than before the last economic downturn in 2008. For the past eight years, evidence shows a stalling, declining economy with pockets of hope but mostly despair. A recent poll cited that college graduates and Millennials under the age of 35 are moving back in with their parents in the homes they grew up in at alarmingly increasing rates. Other recent findings include the following factors that can hinder a graduate’s job search: taking too long to graduate while others fill jobs; going on to graduate school and delaying a career start; not being able to afford to work for less in a career start due to heavy college loan debt.

What is a newly minted college graduate to do? Is the college degree they hold in their hands worth it? Will they find a job? Will they make enough to pay off student loans and college debt while at the same time living independently from their parents?

 

Welcome to the “new normal” of what is the big Millennial challenge: Finding jobs that pay well enough to satisfy debt while at the same time affording a lifestyle.

In this brave, new world of global capitalism, government spending, and oversight, new regulations such as the new overtime mandate of paying salaried workers more for overtime…. graduates are in for a big wake up call! And more, older, qualified and more senior workers are standing in line for those jobs.

Happy yet? Keep reading. The US economy is stalled. Unfortunately, the government has decided to make it their role to tell employers how to run their businesses. Small businesses—the county’s backbone of entrepreneurship—have become stressed and many have closed or re-shifted to allow for these regulations. Some economists are predicting layoffs over the next few quarters as a result of a stalled economy coupled with higher mandated wages. Additionally, technology is often replacing workers in the workforce adding to the “do less with more” theme in many business operations.

Here are the top things you must do if you want employment in this US economy, and this includes being able to pay off debt:

Get more than one job: It may take a career start for less money combined with a job waiting tables on nights and weekends to make enough money. There is no shame in this, and in fact, future recruiters and employers will react positively to those Millennials who demonstrate a good work ethic.

Don’t expect it to be handed to you: Gone are the days of jobs awaiting. Employers want employees with “go get ‘em” work ethics. As an employer of Millennials, I am always looking for young talent willing to earn their way into my business.

We don’t care about your yoga, essential oils or feelings at work: They call it work for a reason. While some larger companies (Google, Twitter, etc) have offered amenities and benefits attractive to Millennials, these jobs are often reserved for the top few. A recent news report cited high competition for these coveted jobs. Most businesses cannot afford to “cater” to a certain type of demographic like the Millennials.

Communicate the old fashioned way: Look people in the eye, shake hands, talk persuasively, and send a hand-written thank you note. In a recent report by DC-based, NRF (National Retail Federation), communication skills place last on a list of training wants for Millennials. Placing first on the employer’s list? Communication skills. Millennials who understand what corporate recruiters are seeking will be those better able to get employed.

Secure a job that you know you can achieve in and take it: Work hard to prove yourself. My friend, Patti Clauss, Sr. VP of Global Talent for Williams-Sonoma and related companies says to “follow my lead and communicate with me like I communicate with you. Stay put in your job long enough to learn something valuable and transferable,” says Clauss.

Stay in your first job long enough, and work hard to generate results that are good enough to brag about: You must achieve results, get good feedback and move the ball down the field. Only then will people notice you and want to promote you or hire you away.

Don’t be a quitter: The problem with Millennials is they don’t stay put long enough to learn enough to make them valuable to the next employer: Hopping around in jobs is not a career enhancing practice. Employers will take note of a graduate who has moved around more than once within a two to three year time frame. Nobody wants to invest in someone if they know they won’t stay long enough to add value.

Reach out and engage with older, more established mentors in your job or career who can give you advice you won’t get anywhere else. Listen to those who have forged their paths before you and learn.

Read the local paper and read blogs by those in your area of work.

Know that your college degree is only as good as the paper it is on: While we believe a degree is a door opener, it is just that. What you do with it is what matters. A degree (or many) will not convince an employer to select you over others. We see many smart, degreed people out there looking for any job—often an entry level job.

Amy Howell, Author and Founder of Howell Marketing Strategies, LLC

Amy Howell, Author and Founder of Howell Marketing Strategies, LLC

Times are so different and it is critical that Millennials get into high gear and work to get ahead. They must understand that getting a degree is just one quiver in their pack of arrows. Today, they must have many other weapons with which to compete.

Amy D. Howell is founder and owner of Memphis PR firm, Howell Marketing Strategies, LLC, a mother of a college student, high school student and author of two books, “Women in High Gear,” and most recently “Students in High Gear.”

Posted June 17, 2015 by

Data Scientist, Social Media Manager, Civil Engineer, Computer Systems Analyst and Physical Therapist Among Most Promising Careers for Millennials

The Millennial generation – the largest generation in the workforce — has been tagged with negative workplace stereotypes that they’re narcissistic, obstinate and lacking initiative. Yet smart companies know that unless they start hiring these young employees soon, their future is bleak.

Steven-Rothberg-high-res-close-08-13-2013That realization shows in suddenly robust hiring of Millennials. “This is the strongest year of employment growth for this generation since 2007,” says Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter.

“We’re getting close to where we’re seeing equilibrium,” Rothberg adds. “Where just about every college educated young adult that wants to be employed, can easily be employed.” (more…)

Posted December 31, 2014 by

Didn’t Land a New Job in 2014? Correct These Mistakes for the New Year

If you did not get an entry level job or other position of employment this year, then chances are your job search was missing something.  What could you have done wrong that turned employers off from you as a job candidate?  What could you have done differently that would have left them with a more favorable impression of you?  That is what you need to figure out going into the new year.  Here are some mistakes that may have kept you from getting hired in 2014. (more…)

Posted October 16, 2014 by

12 Writing Tips for Creating a Perfect Resume

Cari Bennette

Cari Bennette

It’s a bit of fine line, isn’t it? Knowing exactly what to put in your resume can be confusing. Too much irrelevant information will get you passed over. And not enough information may cause suspicion, as though you’re trying to hide something.

So, to compose the perfect resume, apply the following 12 tips from industry experts to ensure success. (more…)

Posted August 05, 2014 by

Salary Negotiation from an Employer’s Perspective

Ken Sundheim

Ken Sundheim, Chief Executive Officer at KAS Placement Recruiting

After recruiting all levels of job seekers for the past decade, I’ve come to understand that many people lack a true understanding of how to negotiate salary.

The most common mistake we have seen is that interviewees do not know how to accurately gauge if a company is likely to be amenable to accepting a counter offer.

Prior to asking for more money, it’s important to see the hiring process from the point of view of the employer.  The first step in that process is to define what situations will make a hiring company more or less likely to negotiate your salary. (more…)

Posted July 18, 2014 by

College Graduates, Do You Ask People About Their Jobs When Meeting Them? Ask Questions Like These

College graduates who are networking for jobs should think about asking these questions in the following post when meeting people for the first time.

When you meet someone, what are the first questions you ask? Probably what their name is, where they’re from, and what they do. But is “What do you do?” a good question to ask anymore? Why are we so focused on what someone does for a living — and in today’s job-hopping society, does it even

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Posted June 09, 2014 by

Constantly Changing Jobs as a Recent Graduate? Job Hopping May Not Eliminate You as a Candidate

Someone constantly changing jobs as a recent graduate may not think a potential employer will hire him or her.  However, being a job hopper may not eliminate you as a candidate.  Learn more in the following post.

If you’re a job hopper, you may have been a bit worried about marketing yourself to prospective employers. Will they judge the fact that you’ve changed gigs every few years or maybe even every few months? Will you have to explain yet again why you have such a diverse resume of experiences

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Posted February 19, 2014 by

Need Advice on Finding Recent College Graduate Jobs? Why Your Parents Might Not be the Best Source

As you search for recent college graduate jobs, various people might offer their advice, including your parents.  While you should respect their advice, it may not necessarily suit the job search of today.  Learn more in the following post.

Your parents mean well when they give you job search advice. They do! They give you heartfelt advice about finding a job and building a career because they want you to succeed. They want to see you thrive at a job. That, and they really, really want you to move out of their basement! Unfortunately,

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Posted January 06, 2014 by

Did Your Skills Land You an Entry Level Job? How They Can Advance Your Career Without Having a Lot of Experience

If you have an entry level job, chances are one reason is because of your skills.  In the following post, learn how having the right skills can help you advance in today’s workplace, as opposed to having a lot of experience.

It’s difficult to watch a newcomer come in and be given a position you’ve been working toward for a while. What about your experience, the relationships you built and loyalty to your company? In today’s highly competitive job market, the value of seniority is changing. Today, it’s about skills and results, not time spent in an office chair. We

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Posted October 15, 2013 by

Landed One Entry Level Job? How Many More Will You Have in The New Economy?

While Gen Y may be focusing on just landing one entry level job, they could end up working many more during their careers.  In the following post, learn the problems that may exist from The New Economy, as well as tips for young professionals to adapt to it.

Last night on #InternPro Twitter chat, we had a very interesting – and for many, a scary – conversation… about jobs and careers. Specifically, we discussed how many jobs the average Millennial will have in what everybody likes to call, “The New Economy”. Admittedly, I am not really good at math

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