ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 08, 2016 by

Hiring managers value first impressions and referrals

Friendly woman in business formal outfit photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

When attending your next career networking event, remember that hiring managers are watching your every move from the moment you enter the door until the second they begin networking with another job seeker. You can separate yourself from the competition by making the right first impression with recruiters. In addition, you should tell potential employers if you know someone at the particular company or organization. Referrals improve your chances of getting a foot in the door because a current employee can vouch for you, which hiring managers will respect. Internal referrals—referrals made by employees working within the organization—are the best kind of referrals to obtain. Never pass up an opportunity to mention people you know who work for an organization, particularly if you have genuine relationships with those individuals. This isn’t name dropping; it’s networking.

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, shares his opinions on networking to find jobs and how networking influences hiring managers.

“Networking is the best way to find a job no matter what industry you are in. Those of us in hiring positions are constantly receiving resumes from recruiters and job applicants, and it’s really impossible for us to sift through the good resumes from the bad ones. When either meeting someone personally who impresses us or getting introduced to someone through a trusted friend, we’re much more willing to look at a resume and contact the applicant, and we also have social pressure to do so.”

Find more networking tips on our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

Eden Chen is the Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, one of the fastest growing software development agencies in the US. Eden is a serial entrepreneur and heads up various other startups including Knife and Fox (design agency), Ctrl Collective (co-working), Glo Bible (app with 3 million+ downloads), Zolo Studios (game studio), and Dev Crew (international software development).

Posted April 07, 2016 by

3 social media tips for job search success

Resume profile personal job career recruitment concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

Social media can benefit college students and recent graduates searching for internships and entry-level jobs. In order to get the most out of their search using social sites, students and grads must first understand how to use them. We have some help for job seekers in this area.

Kristen Zierau, Director of Executive Recruiting at JMJ Phillip Executive Search, offers the following tips to help college students and recent grads obtain job search success with social media.

1. “When I speak with college career services departments, I give the advice that job applicants really need to clean up their profiles online. There are programs called scrappers that will pull college students and recent graduates’ posts on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, etc. and post them on their own sites. The bad thing about this is while candidates may clean up their profiles now, another site could be hanging onto their information for years. If job seekers show photos themselves doing wild or crazy things (or maybe sometimes illegal things), it’s likely someone will find this social media post. The same concept applies to political views. Students and grads can find the devoted Bernie or Trump supporter on LinkedIn pretty easily as they are often spamming LinkedIn with their viewpoints and political “expertise.” They will also find out many of those supporters haven’t landed jobs since graduating in the summer of 2015, so be careful and keep viewpoints private unless job seekers can do it under a seemingly untraceable alias.

2. When searching for jobs on social media, college students and graduates cannot treat it like a casual message to a friend. Don’t use shorthand writing. Make sure the grammar is correct and everything sounds professional. Let’s face it; college grads need to sound like they actually graduated from college!

3. Pinging hiring managers directly on LinkedIn is a good start; do this six to 12+ months before graduation. Follow them on Twitter and other social media sources, and engage with them once in a while but not too often; it can be considered annoying. If possible, send a link back to the hiring managers showing agreement with their post; that will help keep a job seeker’s name on their minds. For example, if college students and recent graduates see a post about management from them, maybe send the hiring manager a relevant link to a Harvard Business Review article on management showing they are paying attention.”

Interested in finding more tips for your social media job search? Visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Photo of Kristen Zierau

Kristen Zierau, Director of Executive Recruiting at JMJ Phillip Executive Search

A graduate of Michigan State University’s Business School, Ms. Kristen Zierau began her successful career with Target. As one of the fastest rising employees within the Target organization, she became an Executive Team Leader, making a name for herself in the hiring, training, and development of young talent in the retail sector. Prior to joining JMJ Phillip, Ms. Zierau also completed her MBA at Walsh College with honors. Ms. Zierau made a transition to the management consulting and executive search sector, which she is currently on the executive fast-track program at JMJ Phillip. Soon she will be leading Clarke-Caniff, a brand focusing on recruiting and executive search for the retail and hospitality sectors.

Posted March 22, 2016 by

How to use social media to engage with employers

How can college students and recent graduates use social media to engage online with potential employers (recruiters and talent acquisition professionals) during the job search process?

In this 5-minute video, Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter, provides tips and information for students and grads about how to maximize connections with employers while searching for jobs and networking online.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

A study by Aberdeen found that 73% of 18-34 year-olds found their last job through social networking. Social media is truly valuable, not just for use in your personal life, but for professional use as well. 94% of employers admit to searching for candidates on social media before inviting them in for a face-to-face interview.

Clearly social media matters.

According to a Career Crossroads study, you’re 10 times more likely to land a job if your job application is accompanied by an employee referral.

Knowing the right people matters. But how can you obtain an employee referral if you don’t already personally know someone working within the company? By connecting with employers via social media!

First, do an advanced search on LinkedIn to identify employees within the company, particularly those who live in your preferred region, and invite them to connect with you on LinkedIn.

Next, visit the company’s website to see which social media sites the company hosts. Follow the company online, not just to check for job postings, but also to engage with recruiters and hiring managers who post LinkedIn discussions and host Twitter chats.

One way to brand yourself to potential employers on social media is to comment on social media discussions in a thoughtful, meaningful manner. Do not engage in discussions hosted by employers in a hostile, rude manner, even if you feel passionate about the topic; remember to keep online conversation polite and courteous at all times. This isn’t Reddit or your personal text thread.

Do make it a point to share your expertise in subject matter when applicable. This brands you as a subject matter expert. While it’s great to compliment people, or make bland comments like, “Love it!” or “I agree,” these comments are never memorable.

Comments that provoke further, deeper discussion are memorable. Comments with embedded links to other great content are memorable. Insightful, appropriate comments demonstrating experience and expertise are memorable.

If you never comment and simply read threads, you will not be remembered; you must participate in order to stand out from the hundreds (or thousands) of job applicants vying for positions.

To learn more about how to use social media to your advantage in your job search, follow our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Posted February 19, 2016 by

Employers benefit from career services offices

As employers focus on best practices in college recruiting, one of the ways they can create a quality candidate experience is to partner with career services offices. These offices serve as resources that can connect recruiters and hiring managers to college students and recent graduates. Orvil Savery, HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans, shares different ways employers benefit from working with career services offices.

Photo of Orvil Savery

Orvil Savery, HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans

“Employers can benefit most working with career services offices at colleges or universities by challenging, working with, and lastly, advocating for not the needs of just now but the needs of students and employers five, 10, or 15 years down the road. The future isn’t something we don’t see coming, so simply doing what’s always been done isn’t going to benefit long-term interest. Allowing recruiters and hiring managers more say in what gets built and implemented, all while doing so under the umbrella of a reciprocal, collaborative, and diversified understanding is beneficial to both sides.

Employers benefit from these relationships by having a great pool of applicants, short lead times, heavy brand awareness, needs and wants based programming, and increasing diversity in the workplace.”

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

Orvil Savery is a University of Missouri graduate and lover of all things involving talent management. He serves as a HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans. He is dedicated to nurturing, cultivating, and recruiting an inclusive and diverse workforce in which all employees can deliver results through their own unique skill sets, backgrounds, and perspectives to enhance the lives of our colleagues, clients, and community.

Posted January 14, 2016 by

Job application advice for interns and grads

With the spring semester in full swing this week, many college students have begun to ask themselves (or at least their parents have begun to ask them) that age old question: what am I going to do this summer? Or better yet, if they’re graduating in May, what am I going to do after graduation?

Andy Ek, Manager of College Relations, Koch Industries, Inc.

      Andy Ek, Manager of College Relations, Koch Industries, Inc.

Andy Ek, Manager of College Relations for Koch Industries, offers college students pertinent advice and direction related to searching for both full-time jobs and internships.

What is the best advice you have to offer new college graduates about how to prepare for the job search process in January if they plan to graduate in May?
Regardless of timing, I’d encourage all students to self-reflect on their best natural abilities and their specific career interests. What are they good at and what types of roles would they enjoy doing most?  I think it’s important for each student to research firms that offer careers (not just employment) in their areas of interest.  Students will benefit from networking as much as possible (with peers, faculty, employers, etc).  The knowledge gained from building these relationships will lead students straight toward the opportunities with the most potential.

If students want to work for Koch as a summer intern, when should they apply? Please describe the application process.
The application process for our summer internship program starts at the beginning of the previous year’s fall semester.  For example, most students interested in our summer 2016 intern opportunities applied in mid-September 2015 in order to be considered.  All applications are available on our recruitment website, www.kochcollegerecruiting.com, and will require completion of an online profile, a short questionnaire related to the role’s qualifications, and submission of a resume.  Students eventually hired for a position typically receive an on-campus or phone interview, before traveling to a site location for a second interview.

Have you hired an intern who later became a star employee?
Our goal in employing interns is to identify those individuals with the right mix of virtues and talents required to be successful within our firm.  We are thankful to have had numerous examples of star employees hired through our college recruiting process, including eight who are current or past presidents of various Koch companies.

Want to learn more about how to connect the dots along the path to job search success? Follow our blog and connect with College Recruiter on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

 

Andy Ek is the Manager of College Relations for Koch Industries, Inc. In this role, Andy is responsible for leading Koch’s college recruiting program, managing and developing Koch’s relationships with key universities, and partnering with Koch leadership to determine optimal entry-level talent strategies for their organizations. A native Kansan, Andy is a 2004 University of Kansas graduate with a degree in Business Administration and Accounting – he also earned a Master’s in Business Administration from KU in 2011.  Andy was recognized as one of the Wichita Business Journal’s 40 under 40 honorees in 2015.

Based in Wichita, Kansas, Koch Industries, Inc. is one of the largest private companies in America.  With a presence in more than 60 countries, Koch companies employ more than 100,000 people worldwide, with about 60,000 of those in the United States.

Posted December 28, 2015 by

4 ways to scare away the best job applicants

Melissa Burns photo

Melissa Burns

The people who work for a company are its best asset, without exception, and finding truly, high-quality employees is a rare and precious thing. Yet it is all too easy to scare excellent applicants away without even realizing it – and the best applicants are the first to turn around and look for a place where they will be treated better. So let’s take a look at the main reasons why you may not be attracting the talent you need. (more…)

Posted November 05, 2014 by

Tips to Help You Pay for College

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

With today’s challenging economic conditions, the value of a college degree has never been greater. Job applicants must work harder than ever to stand out from the herd and be noticed. A college degree from a well-recognized university is one of the best ways to differentiate yourself, and gain upward mobility in the job market. (more…)

Posted July 01, 2014 by

Recent College Graduates, Have You Applied for Jobs and not Received Positive Results? 10 Mistakes that Could Have Hurt Your Applications

There are jobs recent college graduates may have missed out on because of these top 10 mistakes made by job applicants, which are found in the following post.

You find the perfect job or internship. You apply. You do all the required research so you’re thoroughly prepared for the job interview. But the interview never happens. In fact, despite impeccable follow-up, you never hear from the employer. Why? Because at some point in the application process itself, you made a mistake that removed you

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Posted April 17, 2014 by

6 Reasons HR would Reject Employees Based on Their Backgrounds

Michael Klazema

Michael Klazema

Why do human resources departments run background checks, and how do employers use the information obtained through such background checks to reject potential job applicants?

The first part of the question is easy: human resource departments run background checks on applicants and employees as a means of learning more information about those people. Often, it is difficult for a hiring manager to discover everything there is to learn about a person from a resume, a job application, or an interview, and a background check provides additional facts that can hold sway on a hiring decision. Investigations into an applicant’s background can also tell a human resources department whether or not the person is a good fit with the company in question, or even whether the applicant might pose a threat to the company’s employees, customers, and overall reputation. (more…)

Posted January 31, 2014 by

How to stand out in a group interview

Stressful people waiting on a job interview

Stressful people waiting on a job interview. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Job interviews can be nerve-wracking on the best of days, but a group interview can take those nerves to a whole new level. The atmosphere oozes with competition, as everyone fights to be heard and make the best impression. How do you stand out in a room full of other job applicants who might be just as qualified as you are?

Group interview tips

Group interviews are a great time-saver for potential employers, and provide a unique atmosphere in which to examine communication and social skills. This type of interview serves as a test of leadership and teamwork, two qualities that are high on the priority list of any hiring team. Some interviews might be a simple give-and-take of questioning and interaction, but others could present the group with a problem to solve or a debate to be had. (more…)