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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted November 13, 2013 by

Can Learning a Foreign Language Make You a More Attractive Entry Level Job Candidate?

Have you considered learning a foreign language?  Doing so might make you a more attractive entry level job candidate, if you’re willing to invest the time and maybe some money.  The following post shares some factors to consider before learning a new language.

Hola! Me contratar? Many people aspire to learn a second language in their lifetime, but is adding this skill to your resume really necessary for your career? For many professionals, the answer is s. While becoming proficient or fluent in a second language is rarely easy, it could be a distinguishing ticket that helps you board

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Posted March 20, 2013 by

41% of Employers Suffering Loss of Productivity Due to Difficulty Hiring for I.T., Sales, Engineering, Other Positions

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

The growing deficit of skilled labor needed to fill in-demand jobs is causing a drag on employers across the globe. A significant number of employers in the ten largest world economies said that extended job vacancies have resulted in lower revenue and productivity and the inability to grow their businesses. Employers in China were the most likely to report having open positions they cannot fill and corresponding negative effects on their company performance. Russia houses the largest percentage of employers reporting a revenue shortfall tied to extended job vacancies while the U.S. is among those most likely to report a productivity loss. Japan ranked high among those who said the inability to find skilled talent has impeded expansion of their businesses.

The global CareerBuilder survey, conducted online by Harris Interactive© from November 1 to November 30, 2012, included more than 6,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals in countries with the largest gross domestic product.

“The inability to fill high skill jobs can have an adverse ripple effect, hindering the creation of lower-skilled positions, company performance and economic expansion,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “Major world economies are feeling the effects of this in technology, healthcare, production and other key areas. The study underlines how critical it is for the government, private sector and educational institutions to work together to prepare and reskill workers for opportunities that can help move the needle on employment and economic growth.” (more…)

Posted January 16, 2013 by

Optimism By Employers: India Most and Italy Least

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

A new job forecast for the 10 largest world economies tells a tale of both confidence and caution. Brazil and India are voicing the greatest confidence with more than two-thirds of employers in these markets planning to add full-time, permanent headcount in 2013. Italy is the least optimistic, housing more employers who expect to decrease staff than those who expect to hire.

“The job outlook presents varying degrees of growth and deceleration as governments and businesses strive to rebuild and expand and deal with large deficits,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “Hiring activity in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) is projected to be significantly higher than other markets while recruitment in Europe remains sluggish as leaders struggle to resolve a debt crisis that has global implications. The overall hiring picture is improving, but companies will remain watchful as they navigate headwinds and maneuver through somewhat precarious economic terrain.” (more…)

Posted April 28, 2008 by

A NOVEL INSIGHT TO OUTSOURCING

Forced vasectomies, salvation from a Beggarmaster and a government that changes the law to legitimize their corruption. These are but a few of the adventures in the intricate novel called “A Fine Balance” by Rohinton Mistry. The story takes place in Mumbai, India around 1975. The main characters undergo such an oppressive struggle to survive it’s almost unbearable to read. But the book is written so well that it’s worth the heartache. Though it’s been thirteen years since the book was published, it supplies an interesting insight to a current controversy: outsourcing. The United States, Europe and Japan outsource favorable work to India and save big bucks. And technology is only improving the ease of outsourcing, degenerating American jobs. Check out the facts on “Business Process Outsourcing in India” on Wikpedia. The numbers are staggering. And I could understand the temptation to fathom the outsourced workers as the enemy. Before you do, read the book, “A Fine Balance” and get a taste of what life was like in the city that has taken our jobs.
My favorite character in the book was Ishvar. He is a tailor whose father was a leather curer. If you are not familiar with the Caste System in India, it is a BIG DEAL to change your occupation. Moving up in life when you are supposed to be lower than dirt is a hard pill to swallow. When Ishvar’s father decides his sons will learn a different trade to have a chance at a better life, his family is ostracized. Life is so mean to them, you really wish they would just win the Lotto and be done with it. The injustices they endure could only be seen as a million dollar lawsuit in the United States. As I read the book, I asked people who have traveled to India if it was indeed like the book’s description. To which, I was sadly confirmed that yes, it is. Not to say this country doesn’t have it’s share of people overcoming great odds to succeed but they are not exactly replacing educated workers in a different country by the hundreds of thousands now, are they?
Business’ loyalty is to profit. A business in a country that thrives on capitalism is faithful to the consumer. Residing in the country that consumes the product is no guarantee that the company will employ the consumer. Short of saying it’s our own fault, we have to look at the real problem. The consumer wants cheap flip-flops and children’s clothing at Walmart, it will be made in China. The consumer wants 24-Hour assistance to set up a home printer, the calls will be answered in India. We all have to make sacrifices. We all have to make a living. It’s not the workers; it’s the consumer.