• Consider launching your career in the public sector: Interview with the SEC’s Jamey McNamara

    April 17, 2018 by

     

    If you looking for an internship or full-time entry-level job, you will find many opportunities within government agencies. A public sector career can feel different from a career in the private sector. To sort out the differences and help you understand whether to pursue a government job, we asked Jamey McNamara, the Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer at U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). McNamara draws his advice here from years of experience developing employees and leaders, in recruitment and retention, performance management, compensation and benefits, and labor relations.  Continue Reading

  • What to do with my degree: Entry-level communications jobs and salaries

    April 06, 2018 by

     

    The biggest misconception about majoring in Communications is that it’s a fluff major, or it’s for students who don’t really want to study. In reality, though, the field of communications – which encompasses public relations, marketing, mass communication, journalism, and advertising – is a versatile major that opens the door to a wide variety of careers. It’s not a fluff choice; it can be a very smart choice. Here we dive into entry-level communications jobs and the salaries you can expect. Continue Reading

  • Entry level finance jobs and the skills you need to land one

    February 12, 2018 by

     

    If you are considering a career related to finance, what are your options? Here we share entry-level finance jobs that are available to you, along with the salaries you can expect. We’ll also share the skills you need to launch and grow your career, and what makes a Finance major worth it.

    You will find finance jobs in just about every organization, across all industries. Eunice Frey, HR manager and blogger says, “It is up to you to select the industry that you feel works best for you and has the right level of career progression available for you to take advantage of.” She sees a lot of professionals in finance and banking end up stagnant and frustrated because they are not advancing in a meaningful direction. You should reflect on what career path you might enjoy most, and choose an industry and organization that can provide that to you. Continue Reading

  • Can you really hire unpaid interns, with new rules issued by Dept of Labor?

    February 02, 2018 by

     

    Since 2010, employers have relied on a six-part test, issued by the U.S. Department of Labor, to determine whether their interns could be classified as unpaid interns or whether they should be actually classified as paid employees. In January 2018, the DOL issued changes to that test.

    We spoke with five experts in employment law, talent acquisition and HR to discuss what the new rules mean and what employers can, or should, do now. Our panelists were Heather Bussing, California employment lawyer and contributor to HRExaminer.com; Ben Gotkin, Executive Director of the Association of Talent Acquisition Professionals, or ATAP; Steven Rothberg President and Founder of College Recruiter; Dr. Robert Shindell, President and CEO of Intern Bridge; and Alexandra Levit is a Talent Consultant, Workforce Expert, Author, and Chair of DeVry University’s Career Advisory Board. Continue Reading

  • Professional networking: A definitive guide for students and grads to succeed in the job search

    November 15, 2017 by

     

    We put together our most popular content about professional networking and developed a one-stop guide with everything you need to know about networking as a student or recent college grad. The guide includes tips about:

    1. Where to start and how much time to spend networking
    2. The best elevator pitch and a formula for a successful informational interview
    3. Professional networking tips for college seniors to find a job by graduation
    4. The number one networking tip for introverts
    5. Benefits of joining a professional association
    6. Networking mistakes
    7. How to engage authentically

    Continue Reading

  • An entry level job seeker’s guide to interview outfits

    April 11, 2017 by

     

    The saying you only get one chance to make a first impression really holds true in today’s job market, says Melissa Wagner, Career Services Advisor for Rasmussen College. Your interview outfit is a big part of the first impression you make at a potential employer.

    “An interview is the candidate’s opportunity to sell the employer that they’re the right fit for the position,” says Wagner. “So it’s important that candidates bring their best game to the playing field.” Continue Reading

  • Millennial and Gen Z job seekers: your chance to tell employers what you expect [survey]

    March 22, 2017 by

     

    If you are a Millennial or Gen Z job seeker, do you have a dream job? What makes that job so appealing? Do you make a lot of money in your dream? Do you work from home or have office friends around you? What potential employers attract you? What turns you off?

    Many employers are still grappling with changes and demands that the Millennial generation brought to the workforce. Now Gen Z job seekers are about to enter the workforce, and it goes without saying that employers may not be ready for them. Help employers understand what you want and how to brand themselves well by telling them who you are and what you expect from employers.  One way to make your voice heard is to participate in this SURVEY:

    What do you expect from employers who want to hire you?

    Every survey participant will be entered into a contest to win a complimentary resume consultation and revision session with Career Coach Bethany Wallace. You will also be entered to win one of 50 $5 Starbuck gift cards.

    This survey will help companies help you

    Transitioning from college student to employee is tough. If you don’t have much experience in the “real” world, it is hard to imagine what is expected of you. Increasingly, companies recognize that their people are their greatest asset and they want to help entry-level employees make that transition during the training and onboarding process. However, without vital feedback from Millennial and Gen Z job seekers, your new employer (meaning, the Human Resources manager, your supervisor or the CEO) won’t know what you expect. If they don’t understand how to welcome your generation into the workforce, or develop your skills, there will be culture shock and disappointment on both sides.

    After compiling survey results from respondents like you, The WorkPlace Group and its constituents plan to share the findings with employers as they plan their college recruitment and onboarding processes. They will publish the results in an e-book, in various news articles, and at conferences and webinars.

    If you provide honest feedback, employers will be better prepared to meet your needs. It takes time to develop new strategies for employee engagement, benefits and salary, training and management. Your feedback will give them time to adjust.

    What’s in the survey

    The survey is meant to determine what attracts you to certain companies while searching for a job. According to Bethany Wallace, who collaborated in developing the survey, “We genuinely want to hear from college students and recent grads about what makes them more or less likely to pursue employment with a particular employer.” The survey asks about what engages you during the application and hiring process and what makes you more likely to accept a job offer.

    If you take the survey, give honest feedback. “We expect some surprises,” says Wallace.

    As a teaser, here are a few questions from the survey:

    • Which employer benefits matter most to you?
    • What most impresses you about an employer and their recruiting process?
    • Should employers keep asking about your salary expectations?

    Who developed the survey

    The WorkPlace Group developed this survey with collaboration from Lyon College and Rutgers University.

    Specifically, collaborators include:

    Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, The WorkPlace Group

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Director and Partner, The WorkPlace Group

    Bethany Wallace, Adjunct English Faculty, Lyon College

    Sid Seligman, JD, Human Research Management Faculty, Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations

    Len Garrison, Manager, Career Services, Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations

     

    Want to keep on top of job search advice? Connect with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Utilizing interns: more than busy work

    November 14, 2016 by

    Intern can do more than busy work

    Contributing writer Ted Bauer

    Companies of all sizes frequently hire interns, but the approach to thinking about these interns is usually a little bit misguided. Because interns often represent either entirely free or very cheap (relative to full-time hires) labor, they can become factories of busy work — essentially doing work that others (i.e. full-time employees) either don’t have the time for or, in all honesty, don’t want to do.

    While there’s some logic in assigning the pointless busy work to the cheapest labor source, it’s also a bad strategic play both in the short-term and long-term. Here are two major reasons why.

    “Busy” vs. “productive.” Admittedly, there are many professionals — way above the intern level — who don’t completely understand this designation. And admittedly, not all work at a job can be productive. There is always logistically-driven, spreadsheet-updating, “busy” or “shallow” work to be done. But you need to think about the psychology of the intern experience, as opposed to simply the cost model. In many cases, this is an intern’s first experience with office work — or among their first. If all they do is busy work, they certainly won’t feel very motivated by your company or that specific department. (More on why this is a problem in the next section.) While we wouldn’t necessarily condone giving interns access to proprietary information or letting them set high-level strategy, they can attend some larger scope meetings to learn about how the different pieces of your organization and business model work together. Yes, they might get coffee for people or archive documents digitally from years ago. That’s fine. But there needs to be a mix of straight busy work and some productive work, including opportunities to learn about how the company works, how it generates revenue, and what the different roles do in support of that.

    The value of internal recruitment: Let’s assume we are discussing summer interns for the time being, as that’s a fairly common intern time frame and model. A college summer intern who performs well could become a full-time hire when he/she finishes college. Research has shown internal recruitment (i.e. promotions) to be valuable, and the same methodology works for intern conversion. Organizations are usually set up in specific, clearly-defined ways around process and reporting. An intern who was given a summer of busy work + productive meeting attendance already understands those processes and reporting structures. When he/she enters the company, it’s much closer to a “hit the ground running” situation than recruiting someone from a different college who never interned with you. That latter hire may end up being a superstar, yes, but in the first few months, they will be much less productive than a converted intern. Also remember this about the value of interns: because they have less work experience, they haven’t been exposed to numerous approaches to work. You can more easily ground them in your culture, roles, and expectations than you can with even a mid-career professional you poached from a competitor.

    Additionally, college recruitment should regularly be part of a company’s diversity recruitment strategy — precisely because the organization can start a diverse pipeline to upper management. Diversifying the workplace, which is a common goal of most orgs, begins with diversifying the intern pool and then converting those interns into FT employees.

    One of the clearest paths to intern conversion is two-fold:

    • Have a strong employer brand that will resonate with young people
    • Know what success looks like in an intern role so you know whom to attempt to convert to full-time

    On Thursday, December 8th at Union Station in DC, we’ll be hosting a College Recruiter Bootcamp Conference. At 1:15pm, Susan LaMotte (the CEO of exaqueo) will lead a panel on marketing your company to Gen Y and Gen Z (the next generations to enter the workplace, behind the millennials). After the topical presentation, Susan will moderate a discussion on the same topic including:

    • Panelist: Allison Lane, Director, Corporate Marketing and Communications, The Bozzuto Group
    • Panelist: Jessica Steinberg, Director, Global Talent Brand, CDK

    The registration cost is $98 per person and includes all seminars/panels (you can see the other ones at the top link), continental breakfast, Union Station tour, and lunch.

    In fact, the Dec. 8th event will be at the SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) offices in Union Station. They have a great intern conversion ratio, so we reached out to them for ideas around it and  to get a sneak peek at what you might learn on Dec. 8. They told us:

    The process is more organic.  Internships are working interviews and the interns who exhibit the ability to produce, takes pride in their work products and the mission of the SEC and perform really well are in a better position to compete for full-time opportunities. 3Ls/Judicial Law Clerks (current & pending)/Legal Fellows can apply to our Chairs Attorney Honors program (a highly competitive and prestigious entry level attorney hiring program) and our Business Students have the opportunity to apply to any Pathways or full-time opportunity that best fits their skill sets.”

    “Working interviews” is a great attitude.

    We’d love to see you on December 8th in the SEC’s home. There are also panels on ROI and metrics around the recruiting space, so by attending both, you can have a more holistic picture of intern conversion and its benefits. Register today at www.exaqueoevents.com/register

  • College Recruiting Bootcamp: featuring Pete Radloff

    November 10, 2016 by

    pete-radloffWho is Pete Radloff?

    Principal Technical Recruiter, comScore, Inc.

    What you’ll hear from Pete at the Bootcamp:

    How to convert interns into permanent, full-time employees upon graduation

    Why you’d be wise to listen to Pete’s advice:

    Pete Radloff has 15 years of recruiting experience in both agency and corporate environments, and is the Principal Technical Recruiter at comScore, as well as a Lead Consultant for exaqueo. He has also worked with brands like National Public Radio (NPR) and LivingSocial. Pete’s experience stretches across several areas of talent acquisition, including recruitment and sourcing, social media, employment branding, recruitment operations and the training and mentoring of recruiters. He’s known for his pioneering sourcing techniques, exceptional knowledge of the college market and his honest writing in numerous recruiting publications.

    Pete’s specialties are technical and non-technical recruitment, social media recruiting, employment branding, candidate sourcing, recruiting operations and management. Building recruitment processes from scratch or enhancing existing processes. Employee Referral Program development, ATS selection and implementation, college/university recruiting and relations and Recruiter and Interviewer training development.

     

    The College Recruiting Bootcamp will be focused, fast and mentally challenging. Join us in D.C. on December 8, 2016 at the SEC headquarters. Reserve your space today!

  • When your internship lands you a full-time job, what changes to expect

    November 04, 2016 by

    Intern happy to take jobMany students and grads take internships with the hope of them turning into full-time employment. When you get hired on full-time, you will assume more responsibility, so get ready to step up!

    You’re a grown up now. School and your internship are over.  You should recognize the expectations that your company has of you now. Susana Quirke, Content Writer and Marketing Executive at Inspiring Interns recounts, “We once had an intern take multiple days off in their first few weeks, with no doctor’s note, as if this were university. This is a job. Unless you have a real health issue, you have to go.”

    Many internship programs are very structured. You may been part of a cohort of interns. You may have been given specific project goals and received plenty of instruction. Companies who develop good internship programs expect to spend plenty of time helping you learn the ropes. However, when you begin working as a full-time employee, your supervisor may expect you to be able to perform without much hand-holding. Managers simply don’t have time for that.

    “That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t ask for clarification,” says Michele Mavi at Atrium Staffing. “Ask co-workers for pointers or check in when you need to make sure you’re on track. A lack of hand-holding doesn’t mean your manager expects you to know everything. What it means is they expect you to be able to manage yourself and ask for what you need when you need it.” When you don’t know the answer to something or have a problem, follow this rule of thumb. First, try to solve it by yourself. If you’re still stuck, ask a coworker. If you’re both stuck, go to your manager—but make sure to say how you’ve already tried to find a solution. Knowing you first took initiative, he or she may be happier to jump in and help.

    Enjoy your new responsibility! “A full-time employee will always be given more responsibility than an intern,” Susanna says. “You’ll be held to account in a way that you weren’t before, and expected to meet targets reliably. That’s why you’re paid, after all.” But the lack of direct hand-holding should be a good thing for you and your career. As Susanna puts it, many managers will let you “roam where you will, so long as you bring back the goods.”

    Don’t stop proving your worth just because you’ve been hired on full-time. “While there certainly may be a honeymoon period once you officially gain employee status, know that proving yourself doesn’t end with being hired. In fact, it’s just the beginning of the process,” says Michele. If you didn’t go through an evaluation or review process as an intern, you likely will as an employee. One way to think of your review, says Michele, is to “keep in mind is that as an employee you’re a cost. A cost to the company and to your department.” Your company is making an investment in you, and your job is to help them remain convinced that you’re worth it. “At least once a year, your boss will have to justify the cost of your salary against the value you provide.” Michele advises that you “strive to add value wherever possible and growth will be your reward.”

     

    Michele Mavissakalian at Atrium staffingMichele Mavi has nearly 15 years of experience as a recruiter, interview coach, and resume writer. She is Atrium Staffing’s resident career expert, as well as director of internal recruiting and content development. She also founded Angel Films, a division of Atrium Staffing focused on the creation of recruiting and training videos. Connect with Michele on LinkedIn.

    Susanna Quirke at Inspiring InternsSusanna Quirke is the Content Writer & Marketing Executive at Inspiring Interns. Inspiring Interns is a a graduate recruitment agency which specializes in sourcing candidates for internships  and giving out graduate careers advice. To hire graduates or browse graduate jobs London, visit their website.