ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 09, 2016 by

3 online networking tips

As a college student, you might be an expert at using social networking apps like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, and Whisper for connecting with friends and communicating about day-to-day life, but do you admittedly need guidance when it comes to networking online for professional reasons? It’s one thing to post pictures of your weekend adventures with your best friends—it’s another to reach out to your social network for assistance when conducting your first full-time job or internship search.

This brief video featuring Career and Disability Services Coordinator, Rebecca Warren, of the University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville, highlights three simple tips for making the most of social media when networking online for professional purposes.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1)      Clean up your social media pages, profiles, and online presence before becoming active in your job search.

Networking online via social media for professional purposes is a different animal than using social media for personal reasons.  Make sure everything you post (or have visible and set to “public”) is appropriate; would you feel comfortable with the content being seen by an employer or by someone listed as a job reference? If not, delete it. Delete statuses and posts including curse words and long rants, Tweets with awful grammar, and photos portraying you in a negative or scandalous light. The rule of thumb is to always yourself positively and professionally, particularly when conducting a job search. Don’t begin the online networking process until you’ve taken this first step.

2)      Let your existing network know you are preparing to begin a job search.

Let your contacts—friends, family, and other contacts you are already connected to online– know about your career field (which is probably related to your college major), where your interests lie, where you have completed internships, etc.  Be careful when reaching out; when networking online, you never want to demand assistance or seem pushy, arrogant, or nonchalant. When asking for assistance in your job search, attempt to come across as gracious and patient. Remember, your social media contacts are under no obligation to assist you—expressing gratitude for any act of support or assistance is always a good idea!

Your social network will grow based on the people your existing connections know.

Rebecca Warren, Career and Disability Services Coordinator, UACCB

Rebecca Warren, Career and Disability Services Coordinator, UACCB

“If your existing network online doesn’t know you’re conducting a job search, they can’t help you,” says Rebecca Warren.

If you build the support of your initial contacts, you already have many people cheering you on before you even begin.

3)      Connect online via social media with professional groups in your field.

Many professional organizations host pages or groups on social media platforms, including LinkedIn and Facebook, and some even host weekly online Twitter discussions. Connecting with professional organizations and getting involved in discussions requires effort on your part, but this work pays off. You never know when a member of a group might know about an unlisted job opening or an upcoming job opening within his organization. If you are regularly participating in online discussions and making intelligent contributions to discussions, the member may reach out to you about the job opening.

Networking online is similar to networking face-to-face; it’s an ongoing process, and it’s about relationships. Whether you’re using social media apps or participating in professional groups and discussion boards, simply treat people professionally and with common courtesies, and you’ll find your online network growing exponentially.

To begin practicing these three great tips for using social media to your advantage in your job search, visit College Recruiter on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

 

Posted January 12, 2016 by

3 steps to a flawless telephone interview [video]

 

With travel costs skyrocketing and recruitment budgets shrinking, telephone interviews and online interviews are becoming more common. If you’re a recent college graduate, and this news scares the pants off you, keep calm and read on.

Relying solely on your words to carry you through an interview can feel a bit intimidating. Even traditional face-to-face interviews feel intimidating when you’re a newbie. With a little practice and lots of preparation, you’ll become a pro.

Watch our 5-minute overview of a simple 3-step process to a flawless telephone interview:

If the video is not playing or displaying properly, click here to watch on YouTube.

1. Schedule the interview and set reminders

It’s helpful to schedule telephone interviews because you won’t be sawing logs in your sleep when the phone rings and catches you off guard. You’ll be alert, prepared, and much more likely to perform well during phone interviews if you schedule them.

Another important part of scheduling telephone interviews is knowing who’s calling whom. If you’re calling your interviewer, set a reminder in your phone, and keep your phone charged and with you so you’ll hear the reminder/alarm. And don’t forget one other important thing—contact information for your interviewer. It’s best to have two ways to contact your interviewer in case one phone number doesn’t work that day or technology fails you. Obtain both your interviewer’s phone number and email address if possible.

Related: Phone interview questions and answers

2. Prepare

Tursk Aleksandra/Shutterstock.com

There are several ways to prepare well for telephone interviews. Let’s hit the high points.

Above all, prepare for a phone interview the same way you’d prepare for any other interview—reviewing basic interview questions, researching the company, getting a good night’s sleep the night before, etc.

Telephone interviews are a different animal, though, than face-to-face interviews, so let’s focus on how to prepare specifically for phone interviews versus face-to-face interviews.

Related: How to respond to the 5 most basic interview questions

Ensure you have all documentation and sources you might want to refer to during the phone interview on hand and available. This should include a copy of your resume, cover letter, digital portfolio, and company website. Be sure to send copies of said documents in advance as well (resume, cover letter, and portfolio link).

Related: Latest rules for resume writing from expert career counselor

Prepare a distraction-free zone. Schedule your call at a time and in a location free from as many sounds as possible, including children, friends, romantic partners, other students, coworkers, cars, etc. Even if you are great at zoning out and focusing on conversations, your interviewer might not be, and there’s no faster way to turn off a potential future employer than to schedule your phone interview and force your interviewer to try to compete for your attention or discern your voice from five others in the background. It’s also best to eliminate visual distractions from your sight. Give yourself the gift of focus during your telephone interview.

Keep a bottle or glass of water handy, but don’t consume too much. You can’t pause the interview for a restroom break, and you don’t want to cause yourself any discomfort which would distract you either. And by all means, don’t crunch and munch on snacks during your interview, chew gum, or eat candy. Noises like this are amplified over the phone, and you don’t want to come across like a chipmunk on the other end.


TIP: Make sure to supplement your online job search with networking. Once you get guidance from your network, target your online search to the right job titles and companies. After you apply, follow up with someone who works there. College Recruiter lists thousands of entry-level job opportunities. Would it make sense to start searching?


3. Communicate as if face-to-face, but remember you’re not

When you smile, stand up, nod your head, and sit up straight, you sound more positive, energetic, and focused. This is probably the way you would carry yourself physically if you were interviewing face-to-face, so sit/stand this way while interviewing by phone, too. If you’re physically able, standing up while conducting a phone interview, at least periodically, is usually a good idea. It helps you maintain a higher energy level, and believe it or not, it’s conveyed in your voice tone.

Related: How recent grads can ace the second interview

Conduct yourself as if you’re face-to-face, smiling and doing all these little things (honing your non-verbal skills) while on the telephone interview, but remember you’re not face-to-face—your interview can only hear your words and the tone of your voice. Be sure to enunciate clearly and use words you’re familiar with to avoid mispronounced words.

If you follow these 3 simple steps—scheduling and setting reminders, preparing, and communicating as if face-to-face—your telephone interview is bound to succeed.

Posted June 11, 2014 by

Social Media Trends that Could Help Recent College Graduates Find Jobs

For recent graduates trying to find jobs, consider applying these social media trends to your job searches, according to the following post.

Social media changes rapidly; there are constantly new ways of leveraging it in your job search. Social media trends in 2014 include a focus on visual content, new tools for LinkedIn users, and a need for all employees to possess social media skills. To maintain your relevance in the workforce, apply these three current social media trends to

Originally posted here:

Continue Reading

Posted May 22, 2014 by

Want to Succeed in Your Search for an Entry Level Job This Summer? How to Make Progress

If you are looking to land an entry level job this summer, learn how you can make progress towards that goal in the following post.

With summer coming fast, it’s very tempting to blow off the job or internship search and spend your day lounging in the sun. Unfortunately, unless you’re planning on landing a swimsuit model job or applying for a lifeguard position, this isn’t an approach with a high rate of success. To help you create a sense of urgency and

See the original post –

Continue Reading

Posted May 08, 2014 by

Internship Finder, 5 Ideas that Are Not Always True About a Summer Internship

For an internship finder expecting to find the perfect summer internship, the following post has five ideas that aren’t always true when it comes to landing one of these positions.

If you’re like many college students, you may be deciding how you’ll spend your summer. Maybe you’ll go home and work a summer job. You might even have the opportunity to study abroad. Or, you could be hoping to land that perfect summer internship. If you fall into that last

More:

Continue Reading

Posted April 08, 2014 by

Internship Finder, 4 Ways You Can Ruin Your Experience

An internship finder can choose to either make the best or worst of his or her experience.  Learn four ways to do the latter in the following post.

Your internship has the possibility to give you meaningful experiences and important career lessons and connections that change your life entirely. Sounds like too much work to us! Just go through the motions and follow our guide to gaining absolutely nothing from your internship and, in no time at all, your boss will be saying, “We have an intern?

From –

Continue Reading

Posted February 05, 2014 by

Internship Finder, Not Getting the Results You Want? Time to Make Some Changes

Are you an internship finder that is struggling to find a position?  If so, consider making some changes to your search, as talked about in the following post.

Yesterday, I came across a series of tweets from an internship seeker that caused me to stop what I was doing. The despair was palpable… While I understand the anguish, and know this is far too common an occurrence, my appeal to those in this situation is this: Make a change. Make several changes! Do yourself a favor

Source article:

Continue Reading

Posted January 28, 2014 by

Internship Finder, 7 Reasons Why You May Have Not Landed a Position

If you are an internship finder who has not landed a position yet, the following post shares seven reasons that may be holding you back.

Landing an internship involves a lot of work. From reading through internship descriptions to writing your cover letters and perfecting your resume, personal brand and elevator pitch… there are many steps to consider. If you want to be successful, it is best to excel at each part of the process. If you’ve been applying but still haven&rsquo

View this article –

Continue Reading

Posted August 28, 2013 by

Not Getting the Internship or Entry Level Job? 8 Reasons Why

If you are wondering why you can’t seem to land an internship or entry level job, the following post has eight reasons to think about.

Featured: Featured You’ve been doing a ton of interviewing lately and nothing seems to stick. You are interviewing for fall internships, jobs — you’ll take what you can get. You keep messing up the interview and you don’t know why. Here are 8 reasons (compiled from employers) why you didn’t get the job or internship. 1. You didn’t

Credit –

Continue Reading