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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 07, 2019 by

AI, Algorithms, and Who Owns the Outcome

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our closing keynote was delivered by John Sumser, Principal Analyst for HRExaminer, an independent analyst firm covering HR technology and the intersection of people, tech, and work.

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Posted December 05, 2017 by

STEM grads, want a promotion at work? Intel recruiter gives advice for advancing your career

 

Do you know how long should you expect to stay in your entry-level role before looking to move up? Campus Relations Manager Jeff Dunn, at Intel Corp., has advice for you. From years of experience recruiting and developing entry-level employees, Dunn has seen patterns. We checked in to get his advice about what skills STEM grads typically need to develop before they’re ready to get a promotion at work, and what mistakes he sees them make.

Read Dunn’s advice here, or watch our discussion at the end of this blog post.

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Posted August 28, 2017 by

Tips from expert recruiters: the best elevator pitch and how much time to spend networking

 

Networking is part of the job search, like it or not. For entry level job seekers, it’s important to practice a simple introduction that lets people know who you are and who you want to be, so they know how to help you. I met with two recruiting experts who gave their advice for the best elevator pitch, and plenty more tips for students and grads to network and build their personal brand.

Toni Newborn, J.D., is the Diversity and Consulting Services Manager at the City of Saint Paul; and Jeff Dunn is the Campus Relations Manager at Intel. Newborn and Dunn are part of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts. (more…)

Posted November 16, 2016 by

Diversity bonuses: do they work?

Employee happy with his bonusCompanies who understand the importance of hiring diverse employees are pouring millions into their Diversity and Inclusion efforts. One such effort is to offer a “diversity bonus” to recruiters or employees who make referrals. The results are mixed. In 2015, Intel started offering $4,000 to employees who refer women or minorities. It may have played a part in their increase in diverse hiring. Facebook tried to incentivize recruiters to recruit more diversity, and it doesn’t seem to be working. A third example isn’t actually a bonus but a mandate. The NFL’s Rooney Rule requires teams to interview minority candidates for coaching and senior football operation jobs. When they put the policy in place, there were six head coaches of color. Over 12 years, the NFL added 14. This does seem like progress, albeit a bit slow moving.

Some love the idea of paying out for minority and women candidates. Some say it just doesn’t feel right. If you decide to invest in this approach, make sure to think through the risks and how to do it right.

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Posted August 01, 2016 by

4 winning resume tips for recent graduates

Businessman passing document to businesswoman photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

You don’t like getting spam, do you? Well, neither do hiring managers. It may be quick and efficient to upload your resume on popular job sites and send employers the same robo-resume, but hiring managers view these generic, mass mailings as spam. They can spot one-size-fits-all resumes in a nano-second and quickly discard them.

Here are four tips from hiring managers featured in the book, Graduate to a Great Career, on how to create a winning resume:

1. Add a short profile statement and your key selling points at the top “above the fold”

Realize your resume is an ad for branding yourself. Like a newspaper, an ad, or web page, the most important “real estate” is in the top half of your resume. Branding resumes begin with a profile or qualifications statement, a couple of crisp sentences that define your value. A strong profile statement is critical for recent graduates. You don’t have an impressive job title and career history yet, so you’ll need to specify your career focus and value proposition in your profile statement. In fact, many hiring managers told me a big problem with new graduate resumes is it can be hard to determine what entry-level job the new grad is looking for, especially if the grad doesn’t have a career-specific major like accounting or computer science. A profile headline like “Seeking an entry-level positioning” is too generic and doesn’t convey your career path. Remember, it’s your job to convey your career identity, not the hiring manager’s. For example, a recent grad named Erin who was a psychology major pursuing a career in marketing began her profile with the headline, “Aspiring marketing assistant: Psychology grad with pulse on the consumer mindset,” followed by a few bullets outlining her focus, strengths, and marketing credentials through two internships.

2. Expand your skill set to take advantage of new market opportunities

Be willing to take advantage of where the momentum is in the marketplace. During her job search for marketing jobs, Erin, our aspiring marketer mentioned above, noticed big retailers were advertising entry-level jobs and internships in merchandising, an area related to marketing that involves selecting products and evaluating sales performance. She decided to expand her job search and pursue both career paths: merchandising and marketing. Because there were a lot of merchandising internships online, she snagged a three-month, part-time internship at a large global retailer. But Erin needed a different elevator pitch and resume to apply for full-time merchandising jobs, and now with her internship, she had a story to tell. She had a hands-on role in compiling trend and competitive analysis reports, which gave her specific marketable skills. Here is Erin’s new profile statement for her merchandising resume, “Merchandising assistant with strong analytic, merchandising, and marketing skills.” She included new skills such as “completed Excel reports for accurate demand forecasting that resulted in a 10% improvement in accurate buying.” Before long, Erin was offered a merchandising job at a top global retailer.

3. Play to keywords and how the resume robots screen resumes.

The first “person” your resume has to impress is not likely to be a human being but a computer. Due to the volume of resumes that large and medium-sized companies receive, most companies use ATS (applicant tracking systems). Most ATS’s are not kind to new grads since they are programmed to check for a strong keyword match. Since most recent grads have limited experience, they don’t score high on an ATS (Only 25% of resumes make it past the resume robots). If you do have a strong skills match with a job posting, take the time to use the same exact words in your resume so the resume robots pick them out. Your resume can also be discarded if you format it incorrectly. Keep the layout simple with commonly used section titles like profile, work experience, education, etc.

4. Emphasize skills, experience, and results in the “Action + Numbers = Results” format.

Employers now give twice as much importance to specific skills and work experience as academic courses and grades. How do you make your abilities and skills stand out when you’re a new grad with limited work experience? It might take more effort than for an experienced job seeker, but you have more experience and accomplishments than you realize. Make a list of everything you’ve ever accomplished in internships, school projects, volunteer activities, part-time jobs, and the like. Then, follow this formula to create a powerful results bullet:

Action + Numbers = Results

Did [A] + as measured by [N] = with these results [R]

Here are a few examples of how college students and recent grads have created marketable results bullets out of internships and part-time jobs:

• Raised $55,000 in first month calling alumni for university capital
campaign; the top student performer all four weeks.

• As a brand ambassador interning at X Company, challenged to increase
website traffic, wrote ten blog posts that generated over 240 responses,
and helped boost sales.

• Prepared detailed Excel reports and pitches for business development
group at fast-growing technology company that
increased response rate by 15%.

The key to a successful resume and job search is to go for quality over quantity. You need to invest a little more time to create a resume that is right for each job, but it will pay off. Your efforts will be rewarded, and you’ll be on your way to an interview in no time.

Catherine Kaputa, guest writer

Catherine Kaputa, guest writer

Catherine Kaputa is a Personal Brand Strategist, Speaker, and Author of the newly-released book, Graduate to a Great Career: How Smart Students, New Graduates, and Young Professionals Can Launch Brand You. (April 2016. graduatetoagreatcareer.com). She is the author of two best-selling books, You Are a Brand and Breakthrough Branding for entrepreneurs. She is the Founder of SelfBrand (selfbrand.com). Speaking clients include Google, PepsiCo, Microsoft, Intel, Citi, Merck, Northwestern University, New York University, and University of Illinois.

Posted March 26, 2014 by

Intel Corporation Voted #33 in Best Places to Work Survey

Intel Corporation logoIt is important to most of us that we enjoy our work but difficult to know when you’re looking for a job whether we’ll be happier working for one employer versus another. A great way to know if an employer offers a great place to work is to ask the people who know the organizations best — their employees. For the past six years, Glassdoor has awarded its Employees’ Choice Awards to honor the 50 best places to work.  For 2014, the 33rd best place to work was Intel Corporation. (more…)

Posted December 11, 2012 by

G.I. Jobs Releases List of 2013 Top 100 Military-Friendly Employers

CollegeRecruiter.comAttention, transitioning military veterans searching for new jobs!  The following post lists some employers who may be interested in hiring you.

G.I. Jobs released its official list of the Top 100 Military-Friendly Employers(MFE) on Thursday, November 8. And the list runs the gamut from CSX,  a major railroad company headquartered in Jacksonville, FL, whose trains you may see riding the rails in your town to Hormel,  a major food manufacturer based in Minnesota that supports Fisher House Foundation and Wounded Warrior Project.

Continue reading here:

G.I. Jobs Releases List of 2013 Top 100 Military-Friendly Employers

Posted September 21, 2012 by

Top Employers for Business and Engineering Students

Petter Nylander of Universum CommunicationsWhich are the world’s best employers according to Universum’s 2012 survey of 144,000 business and engineering students from the world’s 12 largest economies?

In business, Google placed as the most attractive employer in the world for the fourth consecutive year. KPMG maintained its 2011 second place finish, while Procter & Gamble reached a new high as the third most attractive employer in the world in 2012. “The Google fever is still hot!” comments Universum’s CEO Petter Nylander. “Students are still attracted to Google’s relaxed and creative work environment, international atmosphere and innovative products. Google lets the students know that they offer great benefits that are hard for other companies to match.” In engineering, Google takes first place for the fourth consecutive year in a row. IBM and Microsoft nabbed second and third place, respectively. “The giants in the software industry are seen as great places for the launch of an engineering or IT career,” said Nylander. “They offer training, networking and future career possibilities.”

The rankings reveal dramatic trends: (more…)