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Posted May 18, 2016 by

5 onboarding tips to make the first day a success for new hires

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

The first day on the job is always nerve-wracking, especially for the recent college graduate starting their first job, or the entry-level employee taking that next step in their career. That’s why it’s important for employers to create an onboarding program to acclimate new hires and make them feel welcome from day one.

“Sometimes the simplest things get overlooked and the smallest things make a huge impression,” says Julie Desmond, a talent acquisition specialist with Tennant Company, a manufacturer of indoor and outdoor environmental cleaning solutions with over 3,000 employees worldwide.

Here are five onboarding tips to make the first day a success for new hires:

1. New hires must know exactly what to bring
According to a 2009 study by the Aberdeen Group of senior executives and HR staffing and recruiting personnel, 83 percent of the highest performing organizations began onboarding prior to the new hire’s first day on the job. Do this by sending the new employee a checklist of things to bring for that that first day: Driver’s license or form of identification, social security card, and names and numbers of emergency contacts, are a good start. Let them know they will be completing paperwork such as a W-4 or I-9, benefits and payroll forms.

“I’ve been in onboarding sessions where this information wasn’t conveyed in advance,” says Desmond. “As a result, it took longer than necessary to get through this step. We know this is a high-hassle moment for new employees. Making it easy is very, very simple.”

2. New hires must know exactly where to go
We’re not talking directions to the office. And it’s not enough to simply tell new hires what time to arrive that first day on the job. There should be a clear onboarding plan in place, says Desmond. Tell them “when you arrive, ask for Jane Smith. Jane will meet you there and bring you to a conference room where you will complete your new hire paperwork.”

This gives them a point person to reach out to versus showing up and sheepishly asking the front desk staff who to ask for and where to go.

“When people know what to expect, they are more comfortable, better able to learn and process information, and from day one they understand that, here, we communicate clearly and don’t waste time guessing at what’s going to happen next,” says Desmond.

3. Don’t assume the employer knows what you know
The worst part about a new job is just that – it’s new and there are unknowns. That’s why an established person within the company needs to make sure the new hire knows the company dress code, where the bathrooms are, how to ask for days off, and where they can get coffee or a bite to eat. “Everyone forgets these things, because insiders already know,” says Desmond.

4. Have the new hires’ technology in place
This person has been planning for their first day on the job for the past two weeks. So, why is it that new hires always spend part of the first day on the phone with IT?

“Good talent is hard to come by,” says Desmond. “When our new hire heads home at the end of the day, do we want him or her to tweet, “first day on the job, got a cool new laptop and got started on a cool new project already.” Or do we want them to say, “Not sure about the new gig. Spent all day with Freddie from the IT Help desk.”

5. Make the first day special
The little things count, says Bob LaBombard, CEO of GradStaff, a company that serves as a career matchmaker for recent college graduates and companies that are looking to fill entry-level jobs. Make sure the new hire’s work station is ready, announce the new hire company-wide via email (with picture, if possible), describe their background and role and have top executives or department leaders personally introduce themselves to the new hire. “Make sure the new hire knows their presence is important,” says LaBombard. After paperwork is complete, the new hire should meet with their manager, and new team members. If possible, take the new employee out to lunch to get to know them better.

This may just be another day for HR, a manager and other company employees, but for new hires, especially recent college grads, this is arguably the biggest day of their professional career to this point.

It’s important to them – and should also be to employers.

“Day one matters more than ever for new recruits,” says Desmond.

For more onboarding tips, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Julie Desmond, a Talent Acquisition specialist with Tennant Company

Julie Desmond, a Talent Acquisition Specialist with Tennant Company.

 

Julie Desmond is a Talent Acquisition specialist with Tennant Company, a manufacturer of indoor and outdoor environmental cleaning solutions with over 3,000 employees worldwide. Tennant Company is committed to providing a rewarding work environment where employees have opportunities to contribute their unique talents and skills to building an even stronger Tennant.

 

 

Bob Labombard

Bob Labombard, CEO of Gradstaff, Inc.

Bob LaBombard has more than 30 years of business experience in the chemical, environmental, professional services and staffing industries, including 18 years of staffing industry experience as CEO of GradStaff, Inc., and founder and CEO of EnviroStaff, Inc. He is a leader in helping client companies develop comprehensive strategies to fill both short- and long-term staffing requirements.

 

Posted July 11, 2014 by

Having Trouble Interviewing for Jobs, Recent Graduate? 6 Mistakes You’re Making

As a recent graduate interviewing for jobs, you don’t want to do anything that could ruin your chances of landing a new position.  However, if you’re not getting hired, the following post shares six mistakes that could be holding you back.

Job seekers, there is a huge difference between arrogance and confidence; watch your body language, and beware of your cell phone etiquette. After all, you are in an interview!

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Posted April 11, 2014 by

Breaking through an HR position: The three most important interview questions you ought to know

 

A job as HR professional is one of most respected and of importance in an organization.  They are in charge of some vital tasks such as identifying and hiring new talent for the company, and coordinating between the management and the employees. If you are studying human resource management and are looking to make a career in this field then you better go through this post which is rich with the things you need to know for your first interview. (more…)

Posted March 05, 2014 by

What Does It Take to Get Hired for Jobs for Recent College Graduates? 15 Top Traits for Candidates

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Are you the perfect job candidate? There are certain traits employers look for in the ideal job seeker. During your job search, remember no job applicant is perfect, though each and every one should strive for consistent improvement. With that being said, recruiters, hiring managers and human resource professionals will prioritize hiring job seekers who can be described

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Posted February 25, 2014 by

Does Your Resume for an Entry Level Job Include Your Mailing Address?

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This discussion has been of extreme interest on my end as a professional resume writer. In general, candidates are frustrated by the “strikes” that go against them based on the socio-economic status of the location of their residence, or for being discarded from consideration due to the fact they aren’t in what employers deem

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Posted January 29, 2014 by

Preparing to Interview for an Entry Level Job? How Employers Expect You to Dress

If you’re not sure how to dress when preparing to interview for an entry level job, employers share some advice in the following post.

You’ve likely heard the expression “clothes make the man (or woman)”. Perhaps nowhere is this more relevant than in a job interview. Perhaps you know how important it is to dress professionally, but did you know the colors you wear require just as much consideration. A new survey from CareerBuilder asked more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource

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Posted September 16, 2013 by

Job Offers Are Not Always Negotiated By Employees

While job seekers may put a lot of effort into their job searches, they may not necessarily think as much about negotiating upon receiving job offers. Did you know that nearly half of workers accept offers without negotiation? This is understandable since many people just want to find employment.  The following post takes a closer look at this issue. (more…)