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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 09, 2016 by

Common networking mistakes to avoid

Dishonesty, moral dilemma, liar photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

As college students and recent graduates enter the workforce, they will likely meet people who can assist them with their job searches. When these opportunities arise, job seekers be prepared to take advantage of them. While some job seekers may not be the most outgoing in terms of personality, they can still be effective when networking. However, if students and grads don’t understand how to network, they can hurt their chances of building important relationships that can advance their careers. So as job seekers attend networking events, they must be mindful of what not to do. Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University, highlights common networking mistakes to avoid.

“Blindly reaching out without knowing basic information about a person, the kind of details usually found through a quick Google or LinkedIn search, is a red flag signaling a bad start to the networking experience. A wishful connection will be less likely to engage if college students or prospective hires don’t bring any background knowledge to the table.

Expecting a networking connection will “tell me what to do.” Before reaching out, know the information you want. It’s helpful to have an informal script handy. “My name is Sue Smith; I’m a business major and art history minor interested in an entry-level job working in the cosmetic industry in New York. I’m hoping to secure a summer internship. Could you share with me how you got into the industry and any suggestions or recommendations you might have?”

Thinking the number of connections matters. Networking is about relationships, not numbers. Targeted outreach to people who share common interests makes networking effective. Two people may connect in an unlimited number of ways, such as graduating from the same school, being from the same hometown, choosing a similar academic path, or by an interest in a particular career. Whatever it is, a real connection matters.

The first outreach is inappropriate or unprofessional. Treat networking opportunities as professional conversations. It’s easier to move from formal to casual than vice-versa. Having good manners and dressing appropriately (which is very different if you’re interested in a career in journalism versus a career on Wall Street) is critical in creating the first impression that builds your reputation.”

Want to learn more about networking mistakes? Head to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University

Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University

With more than 25 years of experience in the private sector, nearly half assisting organizations with recruiting, interviewing, and hiring top talent, Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, has an insider’s understanding of what employers are seeking and helping students and recent grads showcase their academic skills and personal experiences. Wake Forest’s one, university-wide employer relations team means Summers has experience with and supports the employment search for students in all academic areas, teaching and empowering them to articulate the value of their education for today’s employers.

Posted December 08, 2014 by

Where Do Your Hires Come From?

Congratulations, you're hired! says manager to selected candidate

Congratulations, you’re hired! says manager to selected candidate. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

For the past decade, Gerry Crispin and Mark Mehler of CareerXroads have surveyed thousands of employers about where their hires originated. This reliable study (you can get your copy here) consistently points to three top sources:

  1. Referrals;
  2. Employer career sites; and
  3. Job boards.

(more…)

Posted August 27, 2014 by

Why Are Employee Referrals the Most Fruitful Way to Hire

Portrait of multi-cultural office standing in a lobby

Portrait of multi-cultural office standing in a lobby. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Employee Referral is a simple internal recruitment method to interview and hire more employees through the referrals provided by their existing employees. The employees simply forward the résumé of a family member or friend who is looking for employment to the hiring department of the organisation. If their referral is selected, the employees receive a referral bonus. Employee referrals are few of the most cost effective ways of employee recruitment and the best means to build man power required by the organisation. With the growing number of dissatisfied employees and increased workforce attrition, it is becoming more and more essential for companies to hire quality employees that will stay and contribute to the business workflow. Listed below are the various benefits of employee referral schemes. (more…)

Posted December 30, 2013 by

Create an Entry Level Job Opportunity Before One Opens Up

If you are having trouble finding an entry level job, learn how to create an opportunity for yourself with the company you wish to work for in the following post.

Just about every job seeker can tell this story: They apply for the perfect job opening. And then they wait. And wait. They never hear from the company. An organization may want to hire, and may post open positions, but that doesn’t mean it’s in a rush to fill them. Job seekers should note a new study by

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Posted October 29, 2013 by

Scaling a College Recruiting Program: @tracybrisson at #truCollegeRecruiter

Minneapolis, MN – [October 29, 2013] – CollegeRecruiter.com, the leading niche job board for college students searching for internships and recent graduates hunting for entry-level jobs and other career opportunities, is pleased to announce that Tracy Brisson of The Opportunities Project will lead a discussion track on From Zero to Hundreds or Even Thousands of Hires: Scaling a College Recruiting Program for Growth and Quality at #truCollegeRecruiter Atlanta and that tickets are now available at www.truCollegeRecruiter.com for our fourth, fifth, and sixth recruiting events for hiring managers, recruiters, and other human resource leaders. (more…)

Posted August 06, 2013 by

Mechanical engineering is a sizzling degree for college grads

Mechnical technician operating machine

Mechanical technician operating machine. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

May brings more than Memorial Day and Mother’s Day. It is also when a whole slew of college graduates throw their caps in the air and then cross their fingers in the hopes they can find a job.

While competition for jobs may be stiff — the National Center for Education Statistics (nces.ed.gov, 2012) says more than 1.7 million bachelor’s degrees were conferred in 2010-2011 alone — there is one group of students that could have little problem landing a position right out of school. Those students are engineering majors, and within the field, mechanical engineering grads are some of the most coveted. (more…)

Posted July 30, 2013 by

Can’t Find an Entry Level Job or Paid Internship at the Moment? What About an Unpaid Internship?

If you have recently graduated from high school or college and are struggling to find an entry level job or paid internship, think about taking an unpaid internship.  The following post shares some thoughts on these opportunities.

Featured: Featured One of our Twitter followers, @BrokeMillennial , wrote this article on unpaid internships and “working for free” and asked for my thoughts on the subject. This prompted me to share a few thoughts on unpaid internships: read more

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A Few Thoughts On Unpaid Internships

Posted July 09, 2013 by

Referrals from Friends Could Benefit Your Search for Recent Graduate Jobs

Hey college graduates, a good word from your network may benefit your job search.  In the following post, learn more about the value of referrals in your search for recent graduate jobs.

It’s the human connection that matters and in today’s’ world, that’s the way jobsearch works. According to a NewYork Times article: Referred candidates are twice as likely to land an interview as other applicants, according to a new study of one large company by three economists from the Federal Reserve Bank of New

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When Friends Refer You Land a Job Faster – Jobs With Friends

Posted May 02, 2013 by

Hiring for Recent College Graduate Jobs? Share These 6 Tips with Your Recruiters

Whether you are hiring for recent college graduate jobs or for experienced positions, your recruiters need the right information in order to improve their chances of finding the right candidates for your company.  Learn six tips they can apply in the following post.

Recruiters in the industry often talk about “source of hire.” We’re always looking for new sources, methods or people who can generate more candidates for the jobs we’re trying to fill. But the source of potential candidates only scratches the surface; building a world-class recruiting team is just as important as

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6 Tips for Training Your Recruiting Team to Hire Smarter

Posted May 08, 2012 by

Economy Gained 1.9 Million Jobs In Past Year

Bureau of Labor StatisticsThere were 3.7 million job openings on the last business day of March, little changed from February but up significantly from a year earlier, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The hires rate (3.3 percent) and separations rate (3.1 percent) were unchanged in March. This release includes estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations for the nonfarm sector by industry and by geographic region.

Job Openings

The number of job openings in March was 3.7 million, little changed from February. Job openings increased in the manufacturing sector. The number of total nonfarm job openings has increased by 1.3 million since the end of the recession in June 2009. (more…)