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Posted May 28, 2016 by

Core advantages of vocational and technical education programs

Engineering photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

There are many purposes served by vocational and technical colleges. These colleges create many opportunities for students to further their professional careers and to earn more money. They also offer many career programs in practical fields that don’t require academic training in traditional four-year programs.

This article will present some core advantages of vocational and technical courses offered by colleges to high school students.

Shortening freshman year

For high school students, the most prominent and motivating factor of enrolling into vocational programs is that they enable students to shorten their freshman year in college. Since the college years are in a traditional four-year degree program, quarters and semesters usually involve credits earned. Students can considerably shorten their freshman year and earn enough college credits during high school. This might add up enough to cut freshman year in half for some.

Winning college credits

It is a fact that high schools do not offer this option. However, there are many vocational and technical colleges that provide entry-level classes to students studying in high schools who have established a good capacity and ability for college education. Usually, this is ascertained through a counselor or mentor who guides students, even though there are some schools that allow high school students to enroll for classes.

Since college level classes are taken by high school students, they are given the chance by vocational and technical programs to start their college education. Usually, students can attend classes at night, after the end of their regular high school duration. The credits won by these programs can be put toward first-year generals at a conventional education center.

Getting used to college years

The environment of a vocational and technical college program is one between high school and college. This approach makes an undeniably perfect learning environment for high school students to become familiar with a different learning experience.

Typically, students want the stress-free and informal learning environment, and they can experience it by enrolling into a vocational program. It is a common fact that high school is usually infamous for being filled with ‘cliques,’ but the college life is more relaxed, as it involves more social aspect and social interaction.

Creating a perfect college application

The college application process for admission is another one of the motivating factors for taking a vocational and technical program during high school. Students want admissions to highly desirable and top-ranking universities, but getting in a college or university is fierce competition. Thus, students will have to do everything to make their college applications the best.

Specialty career programs

The subject matter in specialty courses is one more reason to consider vocational programs during high school. If we talk about the United Kingdom, there are many high schools dropping numerous elective programs and the budget cuts are the main reason behind it. There are many cases in which the first subjects and programs to be dropped are physical activities like shop, band, and physical education.

For students with interests in any of these programs, their only option available is taking them at a vocational college. They can find an extensive array of these vocational programs at most vocational and technical colleges. Plus, the bonus is students will get in-depth and hands on vocational classes they can’t find in high school.

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John Kelly is a professional and proactive article writer, as well as an education counselor. He also provides UK writing help to customers for enhancing their skills and knowledge. He also writes articles for the benefit of students.

Posted September 29, 2014 by

Need a Vocation? Information If You’re Considering Vocational School

If you are a high school or college student looking for an opportunity to learn a new skill that can lead to a career, then going to vocational school may be a good option for you.  The following infographic takes a look at the past and present of vocational education, the benefits it has to offer, and more. (more…)

Posted August 26, 2014 by

High School Students, Want to Impress Recruiters with Your Emails? Tips to Remember

When writing their emails to professional contacts, such as recruiters, high school students should take them seriously.  The following post shares tips they should remember.

Featured: Featured Over the past year, we’ve had an increased interest in our site from high school students. This is great news, as it shows that young people are taking their future seriously and thinking about what they want to do with their life even before they get to college. It’s important that high

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Posted April 23, 2014 by

Serving the Student-Customer

Happy female student working on a laptop

Happy female student working on a laptop. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

A funny thing happened on the way to the student services office during the first week of classes. The long winding line of students had disappeared, replaced by small groups and individuals contentedly tapping away on their mobile devices.

Campuses today are serving a tech-savvy, always connected generation of students that is increasingly empowered to learn and communicate in a non-traditional way – on their own time using their own devices.  This culture of anytime, anywhere communication, with its accompanying expectation of a real-time response, is a challenge that higher education institutions across the country, including the The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, have met using an array of strategies. (more…)

Posted February 27, 2014 by

Why Big Wins are Good for Colleges But Bad For Potential Students

A basketball next to a blank basketball tournament bracket

A basketball next to a blank basketball tournament bracket. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

It’s almost time to start talking about this year’s NCAA Tournament — but not for the reasons you think. Turns out, enrollment often goes up once a school makes it into the Elite Eight or the Final Four, and while that’s good for the college or university in question, it’s less good for the matriculating first-year student hoping for individualized attention and a leg up on his or her peers. (more…)

Posted February 11, 2014 by

Does a Student Need to Become an Internship Finder While in High School?

A high school student waiting to focus on his or her career in college may need to think again.  The following post suggests why a student should become an internship finder in high school.

College was once a time of self-exploration, intellectual curiosity and good times. Now, as we all know, it’s more about resume- polishing and internship collecting. And it seems this flurry of career prep is spreading to high schools. The Rat Race comes to high school That’s according to a new survey. from Millennial Branding

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Posted February 04, 2014 by

Internship Finder, Employers Expect to Hire More Interns in 2014

As an internship finder, you can expect employers to hire more interns this year.  In the following post, an infographic shares more information about internships in 2014.

As we say often here at YouTern: internships are now a prerequisite for starting your career right. And it appears the message is getting through… 67% of the class of 2013 completed at least one internship. The good news continues: according to a recent survey by Internships.com, 56% of those employers surveyed plan to

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Posted November 27, 2013 by

Prep for College Admissions: 4 Easy Tips

Admissions and other words written on a chalkboard

Admissions and other words written on a chalkboard. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

“But she just started high school,” you think to yourself, when your daughter brings home info about the PSAT. She’s doing all that she can to keep up in her physics class, and now she’s supposed to start thinking about the next four-year segment of her education? A Forbes article titled “Why Start Preparing for College in the Sixth Grade” says as many as 90 percent of college-bound high school seniors wish they’d started preparing earlier. Today’s high school students juggle college prep classes, sports and part-time jobs, all while researching colleges, choosing fields of study and applying for financial aid. Here are four things your teen should remember to help them navigate the path to college: (more…)

Posted October 23, 2013 by

College Recruiters, Advice to Share with Students Anxious to Attend College

College recruiters can not only sell the reasons why prospective students should come to their schools, but also be a calming influence since the students are new to the college experience.  The following post has advice recruiters (as well as students) can share with students anxious to attend college.

Featured: Featured I’ve been interacting with high school students a lot more than usual and one of their main fears seems to be going to college. They’ve been telling me about the anxiety they feel going into college and being on their own for the first time. I’ve been thinking back on my

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Posted October 21, 2013 by

How Will Colleges Adapt to New Populations?

Michelle Asha Cooper

Michelle Asha Cooper, Ph.D., President of the Institute for Higher Education Policy

American higher education is grappling with issues that will significantly alter its landscape. And some postsecondary leaders, confounded by these changes, have wondered how they should adapt. While the current era of postsecondary education reflects a significant moment in our nation’s history, it is important to remember that this is not the first–not even the second or the third–time that our colleges and universities have had to adapt to new populations. Throughout the 20th century, seminal legislative efforts–GI Bill of 1944, Civil Rights Act of 1965, and Higher Education Act of 1965–helped to make higher education accessible and affordable for millions more Americans, and in turn, changed the face of the nation’s college campuses.

While it is true that projected population declines will decrease the number of high school students in the college pipeline, we must acknowledge that our current system operates inefficiently now. As it stands, less than two-thirds of high school graduates go directly to college, thereby leaving behind a sizeable pool of students from disadvantaged backgrounds who could benefit from some form of postsecondary education. In 2010, just over half (52 percent) of low-income high school graduates enrolled in college the following fall, compared to four-in-five (82 percent) high-income graduates. If these trends persist, opportunity gaps will continue to grow even absent a shift in student demographics. (more…)