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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 26, 2016 by

Biggest networking mistake you can make

Asking photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

For many college students and recent graduates, networking is likely to be part of their job searches. Their success or failure when interacting with recruiters and hiring managers will depend on their approach. While securing internships or entry-level jobs is a priority, college students and recent grads don’t want to come off as too aggressive when asking about career opportunities. Job seekers should not assume that just because they are eager to work that employers will automatically tell them about job opportunities, including those in the hidden job market.

When networking, students and graduates can inform professionals about who they are and what interests they have. At the same time, they can ask questions to learn more about potential employers and what they have to offer. Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business, discusses a key mistake to avoid when networking and shares helpful tips for a better experience.

“The biggest networking mistake is asking people if they know of any open jobs. It’s good to be aggressive and show you’re looking for work. But why should anyone recommend you, especially if they don’t know you or your work ethic?

The best way to network is showing curiosity about what people do. Ask them and tell them you’d like to learn more about their profession; establish an interest in them. They may recommend you and say “This person is interested in…and may be good for the position.” Asking employers if they’re hiring won’t be as effective as “Hey, what do you do?” Avoid that mistake and you’ll be better at networking.”

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Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business

Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business

Marc Prosser is the Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business, a site that provides reviews and articles for small business owners. Prior to starting Fit Small Business, Marc was the CMO of FXCM for 10 years. He joined as FXCM’s first employee and grew the company to more than 700 employees.

Posted July 03, 2016 by

Networking tips for introverted job seekers

Woman with glasses covering her mouth with a document photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

While being shy is not a crime, it is something job seekers need to overcome to network. For introverted college students and recent graduates, networking might seem impossible or intimidating when trying to find internships or entry-level jobs. However, that doesn’t mean introverts can’t interact well with people. Knowing what to do ahead of time and practicing it can make introverted job seekers more comfortable when networking. The more confident they are networking, the better their chances of learning about job opportunities, including those in the hidden job market. Peter Margaritis, Chief Edutainment Officer of The Accidental Accountant, shares networking tips to help introverts with their job search.

“Tip 1: Smile and have a positive attitude, which is displayed by projecting inviting body language, a.k.a. don’t cross your arms over your chest.

Tip 2: Ask the other person questions first after you introduce yourself to reduce the level of your nervousness. Ask questions like, where do you work and what role do you play in the organization? These are just some easy questions to start the conversation.

Tip 3: Don’t sit with or follow your network at an event. Break away and meet someone new.”

Want to learn more about networking? Visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Peter Margaritis, Chief Edutainment Officer of The Accidental Accountant

Peter Margaritis, Chief Edutainment Officer of The Accidental Accountant

Peter A. Margaritis, CPA, is a speaker, educator, trainer, humorist, and self-proclaimed Chief “Edutainment” Officer for The Accidental Accountant™. Partnering with the Business Learning Institute, his firm helps accountants and other business leaders to increase their profitability by strengthening their business success skills and improving morale through better communication. He is a member of the Ohio Society of CPAs, Georgia Society of CPAs, National Speakers Association, and the American Institute of CPAs. Peter is also the author of Improv Is No Joke: Using Improvisation to Create Positive Results in Leadership and Life. www.theaccidentalaccountant.com

Posted November 25, 2015 by

4 steps to using social media for uncovering the hidden job market

Social media is an important tool for today’s job seekers. How job seekers present themselves online can either help or hurt their job searches. This applies not only to visible job openings but also those in the hidden job market. Employers haven’t advertised these jobs publicly but need to fill them. The following webinar, 4 steps to using social media for uncovering the hidden job market, shares tips for using social media to learn about job opportunities along with other valuable information. (more…)

Posted September 16, 2014 by

Recent Graduate, Want to Get Social When Searching for Jobs? 6 Reasons to Create a LinkedIn Profile

If you are a recent graduate searching for jobs without much success, then it may be time to go social with your job search.  Learn six reasons to create your own LinkedIn profile in the following post.

Today, LinkedIn and your resume go together like peanut butter and jelly – universally accepted as a good thing, a standard even. Yet, I still get asked all the time: Do I really need a profile on LinkedIn? Here are 6 reasons why you should be on LinkedIn, and if you already are, why you should continuously update

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Posted November 14, 2013 by

Want to Establish a Network for Your Entry Level Job Search? How to Get Started

Networking as part of your entry level job search could help you learn about job opportunities before they are made known to the public.  If you don’t have a network already but want to build one, the following post has tips to get you started.

In a presentation called “Launching an Effective Job Search,” I discuss the “iceberg” graphic shown here, illustrating the components of a multi-faceted job search. Notice that above the water line – the tip of the iceberg – is “posted jobs” and “resumes and cover letters.” This is

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Posted August 21, 2013 by

Tapping Into the Hidden Job Market

Group of college students

Group of college students. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Once upon a time, the want ads were king, and job seekers could be relatively successful in finding employment by pounding the pavement based on what the want ads and job boards were offering.

In the current workplace climate, that pavement has significantly narrowed. The majority of jobs — experts estimate between 70 to 80 percent — are not advertised by employers, so those who rely solely on job boards to find positions are missing out on most available opportunities. Unfortunately, many college students are unaware of the hidden job market and still operate under the notion that earning a degree and responding to job posts is all they need to do to land a great job. (more…)

Posted June 14, 2013 by

Looking for Recent Graduate Jobs? 11 Ways Grads Can Rise Above the Competition

With so much competition for recent graduate jobs, a job seeker must show potential employers that he or she is the best candidate for the job.  In the following post, learn 11 ways you can rise above fellow job seekers.

Use your talent to serve the American public! The IRS has a variety of career opportunities and is seeking bright people like you. Learn more here: http://jobs.irs.gov. After the graduation pomp and circumstance and well-deserved celebrations start to wane, it’s time for 2013 graduates to get serious about finding work in the post-collegiate world

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11 Ways New Graduates Can Stand Out From the Pack

Posted May 16, 2013 by

Have Entry Level Job Seekers Discovered the Hidden Job Market?

When searching for an entry level job, don’t forget about the hidden job market.  Learn how to enter it in the following post.

You glaze at your desktop cruising the job banks, wondering why you’re entering the second month of your job search and have yet to get a single bite. The problem could be that like most entry-level job hunters, you are …

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Knock em Dead: How Entry Level Professionals Can Tap Into The …

Posted November 10, 2011 by

Cracking Hidden JOB Market

Employers across the nation HIRED about FOUR million people last month according to Bureau of Labor Statistics. About 10%, or 400,000 of the new hires earn $100k+ salary. Obviously the jobs are out there if you know where to look.

The “hidden job market” contains 80% of all job openings available but these great jobs go unadvertised. To find these jobs you must explore the “hidden job market.” It’s a proactive approach where you track down potential openings and actively follow up on leads. You won’t find much competition for these “unadvertised jobs” so the extra effort to track them down is well worth it. Here’s what to do: (more…)