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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted November 22, 2013 by

47% of College Grads Start Work In Field Different From Their Major

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Choosing your college major is a significant life decision, but a new study from CareerBuilder suggests it may not necessarily define your career path. Nearly half (47 percent) of college-educated workers said their first job after college was not related to their college major. Thirty-two percent of college-educated workers reported that they never found a job related to their college major. Among more seasoned workers – those ages 35 and older – that number is 31 percent.

The national survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from August 13 to September 6, 2013, and included a representative sample of 2,134 workers across industries and company sizes who graduated from college.

“A college education will give you a significant advantage in the job market. In a tough economic climate, college graduates must be flexible and open to taking positions outside their area of study. Taking the knowledge gained in college and branching out with it in unexpected directions is common after graduating,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “In most cases, workers who went into a new field ended up liking the new industry. Odds are you won’t get that dream job right out of school, but it’s important to remember that there are many different paths.” (more…)

Posted November 19, 2013 by

Do You Believe College Prepares Students for Recent Graduate Jobs?

Find out what students think about whether or not college prepares them for recent graduate jobs in the following post.

recruiting (2) A survey recently conducted by the University of Phoenix and Harris Interactive asked working adults whether they felt college had prepared them for their careers. Of more than 1,600 working adults surveyed,…

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Posted August 16, 2013 by

10 Ways To Stand Out In Your Job Interview

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

I often speak with job seekers who tell me that they’ve applied to dozens or even hundreds of jobs yet are still either unemployed or stuck in a job they hate. Overwhelmingly they believe the problem is with their resume yet one question that I’ll ask often reveals the problem — if there is one — has more to do with their interviewing skills and less to do with their resumes. The question that I ask is whether they’re getting interviews and how often. If they’re getting an interview for every five or so jobs to which they’re applying, that’s a reasonable ratio so their problem likely has nothing to do with their resume or the jobs to which they’re applying. If they’re getting an interview for every 100 jobs, then there’s a good chance there’s a problem with their resume, the jobs to which they’re applying, or both. But what if they’re getting lots of interviews but those interviews are not leading to job offers? Then the problem likely relates to their interviewing skills.

Some job seekers believe that they must stand out to potential employers during the interview stage and, to an extent, I agree. If an employer interviews 10 people for one opening and can’t remember anything about you, the likelihood of you getting the offer is pretty slim. But just because they remember you doesn’t mean that they will want to extend a job offer to you. The key isn’t just standing out. It is standing out for the right reasons. You don’t want them to remember you as a fool or a jerk, for instance. You want them to remember you as someone who struck them as being very likely to succeed in their workplace. (more…)

Posted July 19, 2013 by

10 Hardest To Fill Jobs

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

More than a third (35 percent) of hiring managers currently have positions that have remained open for 12 weeks or longer, according to new research. Which jobs are the hardest to fill and in need of workers now? Which professions are experiencing strong job growth and present good opportunities for the unemployed, underemployed and workers looking to make a career change?

“Although the recession created an abundant pool of readily-available, unemployed talent that still exists today, employers are struggling to find new employees for technology-related occupations, sales, healthcare and a variety of other areas,” said Brent Rasmussen, President of CareerBuilder North America. “Two in five employers (41 percent) reported that they continuously recruit throughout the year, so that they have candidates in their pipeline in case a position opens up down the road. The skills gap that exists for high-growth, specialized occupations will become even more pronounced in the years to come, prompting the need to place a greater emphasis on reskilling workers through formal education and on-the-job training.” (more…)

Posted May 31, 2013 by

8 Worst Professions for Gaining Weight

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

A new study has found that more than half (55 percent) of workers consider themselves to be overweight, and 41 percent have gained weight at their present jobs. Of those who say they’ve gained weight, 59 percent gained over 10 pounds and 30 percent gained over 20 pounds. Conversely, 16 percent of all workers say they’ve lost weight while at their current job.

The national survey, which was conducted online for Careerbuilder by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013, included more than 3,600 full-time workers.

Professions that often involve high stress levels or long hours behind a desk had a higher percentage of workers putting on extra pounds. Among those most likely to report weight gain: (more…)

Posted May 21, 2013 by

29% of Employers Plan to Hire Seasonal Workers to Fill Summer Job Openings

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Seasonal hiring expectations this summer mark a continued improvement over the years immediately following the recession, according to a new survey. Nearly three in ten employers (29 percent) report they plan to hire seasonal workers this summer. While unchanged from 2012, the number is significantly up from an average of 21 percent from 2008 to 2011.

The nationwide survey—conducted for Careerbuilder online by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013— included more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

Employers in leisure and hospitality (47 percent), manufacturing (34 percent), information technology (34 percent) and retail (33 percent) are the most likely to hire seasonal help this summer. More than half of all employers (53%) will complete their seasonal hiring in May or June.

“The summer forecast shows yet again that although the jobs recovery has been slow, employers are more confident today than they were three or four years ago,” said Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. “Seasonal work –whether in retail or engineering – is also a good entry point into the labor force for job seekers, as a vast majority of employers – 67 percent – will consider summer hires for permanent positions.” (more…)

Posted May 10, 2013 by

Cost to Employer of Bad Hire Exceeds $50,000

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

A new study shows that hiring the wrong person can have serious implications for companies. More than half of employers in each of the ten largest world economies said that a bad hire (someone who turned out not to be a good fit for the job or did not perform it well) has negatively impacted their business, pointing to a significant loss in revenue or productivity or challenges with employee morale and client relations.

For example, among those reporting having had a bad hire, 27 percent of U.S. employers reported a single bad hire cost more than $50,000. In the Eurozone, bad hires were most expensive in Germany, with 29 percent reporting costs of 50,000 euros ($65,231) or more. In the U.K., 27 percent of companies say bad hire costs more than 50,000 British pounds. Three in ten Indian employers (29 percent) reported the average bad hire cost more than 2 million Indian rupees ($37,150), and nearly half of surveyed employers in China (48 percent) reported costs exceeding 300,000 CNY ($48,734). (more…)

Posted May 03, 2013 by

How Recent College Grads Can Negotiate Starting Salaries

Professionals shaking handsIn a recent study, nearly half of employers reported they would pay recent college graduates $30,000 to $49,999 this year, and 25 percent reported they would pay $50,000 or more. When asked what they would be willing to negotiate when extending a job offer to a recent college graduate, 27 percent of employers said they would consider increasing starting salaries and a significant number said they would also be willing to negotiate other hard benefits such as tuition reimbursement and bonuses or soft benefits such as flexible schedules and telecommuting opportunities.

The percentages of employers who said they would negotiate benefits with recent college graduates being considered for entry-level jobs were: (more…)

Posted May 03, 2013 by

Top 10 Cities for Job Seeking College Grads

Phoenix, Arizona skylineEver heard the expression, “go where the money is?” Well, for college graduates who are searching for entry-level jobs, it definitely pays to go to the metro area with the largest number of entry-level job openings. The top 10 metros with the most year-over-year growth for entry-level jobs for college grads are: (more…)