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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

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Posted April 25, 2019 by

Are you posting “everywhere” when you post your job to college career service office sites?

Recruiting on-campus along with posting on-line has certainly gained traction over the past decade or so, but I would urge those who post on-line to do some research into their vendors. Just as no two schools are alike and, in fact, they’re almost all quite different and deliver very different returns on investment, the same goes with job search sites, whether those are tied in with specific schools or serve a broader and, therefore, more inclusive audience.

Recent estimates put the number of job boards, job search sites, job marketplaces, etc. (different names for the same thing) at about 100,000 worldwide with about 50,000 of those in the U.S. Take out the cookie cutter sites where you have one organization powering multiple sites and everything about those sites is identical other than the look-and-feel and you’re down to about 10,000 U.S. sites. Take out the sites which are run more as hobbies and generate negligible traffic and you’re down something like 500 to 1,000 sites. Take out the aggregator, general, and other such sites which are primarily targeted to candidates with more than a few years of experience and, therefore, not a good fit for students and recent graduates and you’re down to about a dozen. Take out the sites which only allow access to students from certain schools and therefore exclude students from other schools and, realistically, virtually all recent graduates and you’re down to a handful.

Employers who want to pursue a “post everywhere” strategy to build a diverse and inclusive candidate pipeline from students and recent graduates not just from a small number of four-year colleges where the employer goes on-campus but all of the other 7,400 one-, two-, and four-year colleges should be looking at the sites that align with that strategy. On the other hand, if your program is unable or unwilling to consider candidates from a broad range of schools — there are sometimes very legitimate reasons why that is such as the major required is only offered at 10 schools — then you’re going to want to use sites which are only accessible to students from those schools.

Another factor to consider: scalability. Are you looking to hire one person here and one person there and their skill sets are quite unusual? Then you’re going to want to zero in on the sites that allow you do a lot of filtering based on the profiles of the candidates or the sites that offer good matching technology. And for the matching sites, don’t just take their word that their tech works well as much of the matching technology out there is awful. Just as you’d do your due diligence with considering going to a new school, you need to do your due diligence when adding a new job board vendor. But if you’re looking to hire dozens, hundreds, or even thousands into the same or similar roles, can your job board partner provide data to you to demonstrate that it has successfully delivered well-targeted candidates at that scale for similar roles for other, similar employers? Again, do your due diligence.

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Posted October 12, 2018 by

Fraudulent job postings targeting students: “Craziest fu**ing job I’ve ever had”

A handshake. It seems so simple. So cordial. So harmless. Unless it is a job posted to Handshake. Maybe. Sometimes. Allow me to explain.

Today’s Community Digest e-newsletter from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) included a question from Shannon Schwaebler, Director of Career Services at Northeastern State University. She asked if her fellow subscribers, “would be open to sharing their policies for approving employer accounts through Handshake. We were forwarded this Inside Higher Ed article and want to make sure we have adequate policies in place to avoid this happening. We currently have processes we go through for 3rd party recruiters, utilize the trust score, etc. but are curious if anyone has written out processes they are proud of that we could take a look at. Our office wants to make sure there aren’t things we aren’t considering through the process that could be dangerous to our students.”

Hmmmm. What’s this article that Shannon references? Well, I bet that most of the subscribers didn’t open the e-newsletter at all and most of those who did only skimmed it and so missed a nugget that could potentially upend a key way that students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges find part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs. Perhaps a little context would be of benefit here. (more…)

Posted May 17, 2016 by

How to have a great first day at work: Part 1

Congratulations on landing your first full-time entry-level job after graduating from college! Woohoo! This is a huge milestone in your career journey.

Starting a new job can be nerve-wracking. Remember the feeling you had when you started high school? You might feel a little like that on your first day at work, minus the horrific acne and monstrous crush on your neighbor.

This video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, is one of two videos offering help to recent grads starting their first entry-level jobs. Here are five ways you can ensure success on your first day at work.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Dress well, sleep well, and feel well.

Get a great night’s sleep the night before your first day at work. Certainly celebrate your new job with your friends and family, but celebrate at least two days prior to your first day. Wake up in plenty of time to get ready for work. We all have those days when we don’t like the outfit we selected for work, and chances are, it will be your first day of work. Give yourself at least 20 or 30 extra minutes to get ready on your first day at work.

When you look good, you feel good. Dress up (at least a little bit) on your first day at work. Wear an outfit that fits into the company’s dress code, but spend a little extra time fixing your hair or makeup. It doesn’t hurt to feel great when you’re going to spend all day long in training sessions, meeting new people, and looking people in the eye.

2. Arrive early.

Arrive at least 15 or 30 minutes early on your first day at work. This helps you to avoid showing up late due to traffic problems or getting turned around. It’s common to feel disoriented when you are in a new town or don’t know which parking lot to use. How far will you have to walk from the parking lot to the building? Are there designated parking spots? Don’t park in those! Knowing this information in advance is helpful. Arriving early gives you the opportunity to network with coworkers and eases nerves.

3. Prepare an elevator pitch.

An elevator pitch is a 30-second spiel explaining who you are, where you’ve been, what you do, and where you’re going in life or at work. Preparing a brief elevator pitch related to your new position will come in handy when you’re being introduced to multiple teammates, supervisors, and colleagues repeatedly throughout the day. Chances are, you’ll be asked the question, “So who are you? What is it you’ll be doing for us?” Be prepared with a smooth response.

4. Smile often.

When shaking hands and delivering that elevator pitch, smile. Smiling improves your mood and the moods of those around you as well. Start off on the right foot on your first day at work by spreading cheer and goodwill to people around you.

4. Be positive no matter what.

Whether you have to sit through eight hours of training, which you find incredibly boring, or whether you arrive and find that your desk is not set up at all, be positive. Not many people enjoy working with negative people. Avoid making negative comments, regardless of the circumstances you find yourself in. If you need to ask for help, do so politely and quietly. Avoid making a scene in a fussy or dramatic manner right off the bat. Very few things leave a bad taste in employers’ mouths as a new employee who begins complaining before she’s even begun working.

For more suggestions on starting out strong in your new entry-level job, visit our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

 

Posted April 12, 2016 by

6 non-verbal interview tips

Do actions really speak louder than words? Many psychologists believe that 80 to 90% of communication is non-verbal or body language. Studies have shown that 55% of communication is body language or non-verbal communication, 38% is tone of voice, and 7% is the spoken word or verbal communication.

If this research proves true—and when it comes to interviews, these numbers don’t lie—it’s probably a good idea to spend time not only reviewing common interview questions but also brushing up on your non-verbal interview skills. The following brief video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, will prepare you well for your next interview.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Care what you wear.

You only have about seven seconds to make a first impression when you meet someone; think strategically about how you present yourself from head to toe. How will you fix your hair? Have you bathed (and smell clean) but aren’t wearing strong scents (perfume and cologne)? Are you wearing obnoxiously bright colors or flashy jewelry? Did you choose a neutral-colored suit? If you’re a female, avoid open-toed shoes. If you’re a male, be sure to shine/polish your shoes and match your socks to either your shoes or slacks.

Consider every element of your attire and appearance. This lets recruiters know that you value details.

2. Control your facial expressions.

Facial expressions play a big role in how others perceive our non-verbal skills or body language. Smile—avoid a deadpan facial expression during your interviews. It’s also critical to respond rather than react emotionally to interview questions. This doesn’t mean you want to keep a strict poker face when prodded to respond to questions about the worst boss you’ve ever had, but at the same time, you don’t want to snarl and roll your eyes, either. In general, keep your emotions in check at all times during interviews. A great way to do this is by maintaining a positive, pleasant facial expression and by pausing briefly before responding to difficult questions.

3. Maintain good posture.

Be mindful of your posture during your interview. Sit up straight unless you are physically unable to do so. This presents you as looking alert, interested, and full of energy; these are all desirable qualities in an employee. Avoid slumping or leaning on armrests of chairs. Adjust your seated position if you must. Try not to sit on the edge of your seat the entire time, though. Leaning back against the chair makes you appear more comfortable and relaxed, even if you’re totally nervous. Never let them see you sweat, right?

4. Shake hands firmly.

That old adage about having a firm handshake is absolutely still valid. This one applies to everyone. Don’t go overboard, though. Shaking hands isn’t a “feats of strength” contest. You also want to avoid shaking hands and holding on to your interviewer’s hand for a long time. That’s just plain creepy. A simple, brief, firm handshake is pretty easy to master and is a key non-verbal skill. You might need to practice, though, long before your first interview.

5. Avoid distracting mannerisms.

Mannerisms include nodding your head (avoid bobblehead syndrome), excessive hand movements, rapid eye movements or blinking, touching your face unnecessarily, playing with your hair, picking at your nails or cuticles, and other tiny habits you may have acquired over the years but don’t pay much attention to until you’re in the spotlight. In the interview setting, every distracting mannerism is noticed. You don’t need to sit completely still, but you do need to avoid fidgeting.

This is one reason you should think carefully about your choice of hairstyle, accessories, and outfit. You want to be completely confident and comfortable. If you’re not, you’re going to be fidgeting with your clothing, hair, and jewelry; what’s better is to be focusing on the words you’re saying and the words your future employer is saying. You want your future employer to remember your savvy questions about the job opening, not the way you twirled your hair incessantly.

6. Make consistent eye contact.

Be sure to make consistent eye contact with your interviewer(s). You don’t want to stare down your future employer, but you do want to have a natural conversation during the interview. When you have a conversation, you make a moderate amount of eye contact. This is important in all interviews, even in group or team interviews. If one person asks a question, you must make eye contact with all team or group members when you respond, not just with the person who asked the question.

Ultimately, attempt to strike a balance when it comes to non-verbal skills and body language during interviews. You really can’t go wrong with this approach.

Need more interview tips to prepare you for your job search?

Read articles on our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. When you feel ready to apply, register and begin your job search with us.

 

Posted August 05, 2015 by

Job Interview Questions YOU Should Ask…

Jimmy Sweeney

Jimmy Sweeney, President of CareerJimmy

The phone call Jason waited for finally came! He’d been invited for an interview for the job he’d wanted—sales manager for an educational publishing company. Suddenly his nerves were on edge. He knew how to dress for the occasion but he was concerned about the questions he had on his list—the ones to ask and the ones to avoid.

His buddy Wes had reviewed the questions he might hear from the hiring manager so he felt pretty confident about those. But he also realized this would be a two-way interview. Jason wanted to be sure that he got his questions answered too. After all, he might decide against this company if it didn’t seem right for him once he actually talked with the hiring manager and learned more about the company. He was not desperate for the job—just eager! (more…)

Posted March 10, 2015 by

5 Social Skills to Move From College Life to Business Life

Executive Impressions logoLeaving the comfort of college life and entering into the fast-moving, competitive corporate world can be alluring and at the same time, really unnerving. I remember when I started my first “real job”, like every other recent graduate I had a lot of technical knowledge but when it came to attending business meetings, networking events, or simply interacting with other professionals in the office, there were a lot of situations that were unfamiliar to me and to be honest, a little intimidating.

Now with 10 years of international corporate experience and a wealth of knowledge in business etiquette, I want to share with you my top 5 business etiquette tips that can really distinguish you from the competition. (more…)

Posted January 20, 2015 by

How to Get the Most Out of a Career Fair This Spring

A road sign indicating Career Fair

A road sign indicating Career Fair. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Career fairs are full of opportunities for your first “real world” job – the one that will, hopefully at least, launch your career. For many students, it’s the first opportunity they have to speak directly with recruiters and potential employers, and that can make it a daunting task. Making it even more challenging? These fairs are competitive, with hundreds, if not thousands, of talented millennial job seekers vying for positions.

In order to land your dream job at a career fair this spring, you’re going to need to stand out. Here are five tips for getting the most out of a career fair – and hopefully getting the job. (more…)

Posted January 01, 2015 by

The Job Interview: A New Look For the New Year

Jimmy Sweeney

Jimmy Sweeney, President of CareerJimmy

It’s that time of year again—the opportunity to start fresh as you plan for the job interview that’s coming your way in 2015.

Being invited for an interview is a good sign. It means you’ve said something in your cover letter or resume that prompted the employer to call you. So rather than letting worry or fear drive you, focus on the positive aspects of a job interview and look at the experience in a new way for this new year. (more…)

Posted November 21, 2014 by

Best Interview Tips for Success

Woman shaking hands while having an interview in office

Woman shaking hands while having an interview in office. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Job seekers often find it challenging to get the jobs they need because they are not prepared for interviews. An important aspect of getting a job is handling the interview effectively. The first step towards a successful interview is to be adequately prepared.

Be Fully Prepared

Preparing for an interview involves finding out information about the company. This type of information makes it possible for the job seeker to be aware of what the position requires. It also proves to the interviewer that you have made the effort to understand the needs of the company. (more…)

Posted September 08, 2014 by

What Does Body Language Say about People?

While we might not realize it, our body language plays a role in how people look at us.  The following post includes an infographic that can help us understand body language and can benefit job seekers during interviews or when networking. (more…)