ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 23, 2016 by

Financial aid secrets for college students

Financial aid web browser sign concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

alexmillos/Shutterstock.com

With graduation season looming, high school seniors throughout the country are receiving their college acceptance letters and celebrating their impending sense of freedom. At the same time, parents are studying financial aid options and scratching their heads trying to figure out how to pay for the upcoming four (or more) years.

As the costs of attending college rise, it’s important to consider scholarships, grants, and student loans to assist with the hefty fees. There are also some innovative tricks that can help reduce this cost. Here are some insights gleaned from real university financial aid employees, parents, and former college students all high school seniors and their families should know.

Use your FAFSA

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is an important financial aid document college students shouldn’t skip. Even if they don’t think they’ll qualify for any money, it’s important to fill this form out annually. This is how the federal government and schools determine what type of aid to give students. There are many subtle things that can impact the grants offered, many of which are unknown to the average person, and may change the amount a family qualifies for.

Attend class

Many universities have strict attendance and truancy policies to prevent abuse of the grants offered. If a student withdraws from a class due to non-attendance in the first few classes or consistent unexplained absences, their course load may drop below the mandatory credits needed to qualify for certain grants. If you have a scholarship or grant already, make sure you know the terms and what’s expected from your end.

Become a Resident Advisor (RA)

Aside from tuition, room and board are the most expensive costs incurred during college. With the average college student paying $8,535 a year just for a place to stay, it makes sense to try to skimp on this fee. Students who work as a Resident Advisor often wind up with free or significantly reduced room and board in exchange for their services, making this one of the most lucrative student jobs available.

Learn to cook

While Top Ramen may be students best friend those first few months, anything prepared at home is bound to be more affordable than college meal plans and eating out at restaurants. Even if a student’s cooking skills need some brushing up, this is one of the easiest ways to save money. Don’t be afraid of the kitchen.

Find freebies

So much of an average college student’s budget is spent on personal expenses, which often includes entertainment. Seek free options available through the university instead. Campuses are loaded with free amenities, from swimming pools and libraries to dorm dinners, guest lecture speakers, and student clubs.

Join a credit union

Since credit unions are run as cooperatives, they can afford giving customers extra perks that wind up saving them a lot of money. They typically feature lower credit card interest rates, higher interest rates paid out on savings accounts, and reduced-fee ATMs and online banking services.

While the term “starving student” has origins in truth, it doesn’t need to be a reality for all. Instead, research financial aid opportunities and spend wisely to save money and stick to a good budget throughout your academic career.

If you’re interested in more information on financial aid, please visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information on first time budgeting, see what a Bountiful Utah Credit Union might recommend. Brooke is available via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Posted August 20, 2015 by

4 Ways Colleges and Universities Can Benefit from Grant Management

grants word on paper folder showing scholarship or higher education concept

Grants word on paper folder showing scholarship or higher education concept. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Colleges and universities offer grants as a comprehensive resource as it assists students and faculty in meeting the cost of operation of the institution. In the past, a post-secondary degree was considered a pathway to opportunities for the growing jobs in the new economy. Employment requires education beyond a high school, thus there is a need for higher education. However, many individuals find it difficult to access education at the university level because of various reasons. Various stakeholders came up with appropriate programs that supplement and support education at a higher standard. The introduction of grants to colleges and universities has greatly helped. Here are some of the benefits of higher learning institutions that implement proper grant managing experience. (more…)

Posted June 24, 2015 by

Make Your CV Work for You

CV icon isolated on white background

CV icon isolated on white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If you have applied for a position and have been asked to submit a CV, you might be asking, “What is a curriculum vitae?” In the past, you only submitted resumes, so you are in for a new experience, and one that may take quite a bit of time and reflection. Hopefully, what follows will give you some good insight into CV writing and some of the things that you can do to make yours stand out. (more…)

Posted March 06, 2015 by

College Leave: How to Turn an Absence into an Asset

Ryan Hickey

Ryan Hickey, Managing Editor of Peterson’s & EssayEdge

You’ve just spent eight or 10 hours at your job, and now you’re planning on spending your evening studying or going to class. Coping with the pressure can be hard, but returning to college after spending time in the workforce doesn’t have to be a stressful experience. Follow these tips to help you pave the way to furthering your education and getting the job you’ve always dreamed of. (more…)

Posted February 26, 2015 by

5 Key Tips to Starting a Career in Higher Education

Books on campus of university: concept of higher education

Books on campus of university: concept of higher education. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Looking into the future with a career in higher education is a way for you to give back to the world with a sense of satisfaction. Before you begin moving forward with a plan of action to seek a career in higher education it is essential to review a few tips prior to enrolling in the college or university of your choice. (more…)

Posted January 27, 2015 by

7 Steps to Choosing the Right Master’s Program for You

3d image of mortar board with degree against white background

3d image of mortar board with degree against white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Going to graduate school to work on a master’s degree is an exciting way to expand career options for the future. The first challenge is to find the best master’s program for you. Here are a few considerations that may help.

Requirements.

It is usually a good idea to compare graduate programs to find the one that best suits your learning style. Some require a thesis or thesis essays to be written. Others include an internship or practicum. The courses required and delivery style will also be worth noting. (more…)

Posted November 05, 2014 by

Tips to Help You Pay for College

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

With today’s challenging economic conditions, the value of a college degree has never been greater. Job applicants must work harder than ever to stand out from the herd and be noticed. A college degree from a well-recognized university is one of the best ways to differentiate yourself, and gain upward mobility in the job market. (more…)

Posted August 15, 2014 by

College Students, Will You Prefer a MBA or a MPA When Searching for Jobs?

Before graduating and searching for jobs, some college students might want to earn either an MBA or an MPA.  Which one should they choose?  The following post might help students decide.

Stuck deciding between a Master in Public Administration (MPA) and a Master in Business Administration (MBA) is a hard place to be. Although it depends on what you want out of the degree, here are some factors that could help you make the choice to invest upwards of $120K and two years of your life in the

This article is from:

Continue Reading

Posted July 31, 2014 by

3 Tips to Graduate College Debt-Free (or Close to It)

Young male graduate in cap and gown holding piggy bank

Young male graduate in cap and gown holding piggy bank. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The severity of the student loan debt crisis in the U.S. varies depending on whom you ask. The average 2013 college graduate left school with $29,400 in student loan debt, according to the Project On Student Debt. But a 2014 report by the Brookings Institute indicates that student loan debt is no more of a detriment to borrowers today than it was 25 years ago. One key finding from the same study is that the median amount of student loan debt for 20 to 40 year-olds is only $8,500, indicating the average is skewed by extreme outliers.

Either way, the best way to handle student loan debt and the effects thereof is to not accumulate any in the first place. These three tips will help you graduate with little to no debt. (more…)

Posted July 07, 2014 by

5 Tips for Success When Taking Online Classes

Young girl at home learning on her laptop with books

Young girl at home learning on her laptop with books. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If you plan on taking online classes, be prepared for a totally different learning experience.

Looking into a computer screen to earn a college degree is a relatively new phenomenon and students should alter their study techniques, schedules, attitudes and more to be successful. Below are five tips to help out students new to online learning. (more…)