ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted September 13, 2017 by

What if your interview invitation email wasn’t an email?

 

If you text with your candidates during the hiring process, you will likely see things pick up speed. The technology is available, and candidates are waiting for you to use it on them.

Millennial candidates appreciate employers who text with them

Sending texts to candidates has the added benefit of increasing your cool factor. At least for now (before all employers start doing this), this is one way to distinguish your employer brand. (more…)

Posted June 05, 2017 by

Video interviewing: best practices for employers [interview]

 

Recruiters who spend precious time on the time-consuming administrative task of scheduling telephone interviews should seriously be looking at video interview software. College Recruiter recently spoke with Martin Edmondson, CEO of Gradcore, about the trend in asynchronous video interviewing. Gradcore helps employers understand colleges and their graduates, and they help the graduates understand potential employers. Edmondson, a member of College Recruiter’s  Panel of Experts, provides tips for employers who are considering using video in their interview and hiring process. He has seen this trend on the rise and believes employers can save time and otherwise benefit by implementing video interviews.

Watch our discussion below or read major takeaways in the blog post the follows.

 

More employers are conducting video interviews to save time.

More employers are using video interviews, and the opposite trend is true for telephone interviews. Edmondson says he is “seeing a big growth, especially in UK and Europe, around asynchronous video, particularly that second phase of the interview that replaces telephone interviews.”

In fact, a recent survey by the Association of Graduate Recruiters (the national body in the UK for student and graduate recruitment), showed that in the last year alone usage has gone from 29% to 43% of graduate recruiters using video interviews as a selection tool.

They are not meant to be the first or final stage of interviewing. A video interview should be used in the middle of the process, especially for employers who have high volume of student or grad recruitment. A video can give a good picture of a candidate at that stage.

Video interviewing saves time and is a trend

Source: AGR Annual Survey 2016

Edmondson adds, “There isa wide range of providers of asynchronous video interviews out there. Many of them carry the same functionality, but with the intense competition in the field there is a constant flow of innovation to improve the technology. The initial battle for market share led to low pricing,  but there is growing differentiation in product and pricing.”

Pros and cons of an asynchronous video interview

First, the pros. An asynchronous video brings the advantage of efficiency, much greater flexibility for both the candidate and the recruiter, and it cuts down the overall process time. This improves candidate experience and saves time and money for the recruiter.  In addition, Edmondson adds, “video interviews are really useful for multinational organizations recruiting internationally.”


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“They are best deployed when looking to reduce a large pool of applicants down in a short space of time whilst still using a robust process.” In the middle stage of the process, when  you still have a big pot of candidates to get through, an asynchronous video interview gives you pretty good picture of someone without being too time consuming.

Recruiters are used to using telephone interviews, where they can lose days just scheduling them. However, with an asynchronous video interview, you “literally just get your question into the system, send it off to 500 or 1,000 graduates, and you give them 48 hours to respond. They come back with their responses that they film themselves. You can then send it out to the recruitment team to review. So it’s very efficient.”

Edmondson says there is one disadvantage. “They have some drawbacks in comparison to telephone interviews as they don’t allow as much drilling into answers, but the other benefits tend to outweigh this.” That’s why he says it’s meant for  a middle stage, not a final interview. The quality of results from video interviews, adds Edmondson, “as with telephone interviews, is down to the quality and experience of the assessors rather than the medium.”

How video interviews impact bias in the hiring process

Seeing a candidate's face can increase biasAn asynchronous video can, on one hand, reduce bias because it is structured and remains a standard in the hiring process that is unchanged for every candidate, as opposed to the bias that is introduced by “winging it” with small talk, for example. On the other hand, introducing a video in the middle of the hiring process may introduce new bias because now the recruiter can see the candidate’s face.

Related: Predictive analytics and interview bias

“Bias is in the hands of the person watching the video,” says Edmondson. “If you’ve got well-trained recruiters watching, who are conscious of bias, then you shouldn’t have a problem. If you distribute it to managers who aren’t as well trained in bias, then you may have some more issues.” That is to say, it is the organization’s responsibility to manage and control bias more generally in their interview process, be that through video interviews, face to face interviews or any other form.

“When reviewing video interviews you should use the same fair and robust principles you apply in any interview or assessment center context. You should ideally use assessors with an experience and a clear understanding of bias, and score consistently with clear behavioral indicators.”

To control for bias, the video interview offers another advantage in that they are recorded. “So if you have a concern or if a candidate raised a concern, you can just go back and rewatch it to see if the candidate was reviewed fairly.”

Considerations while reviewing a video interview

“When reviewing video interviews you should use the same fair and robust principles you apply in any interview or assessment center context. You should ideally use assessors with an experience and a clear understanding of bias, and score consistently with clear behavioral indicators.”

Another consideration is background interruptions, and recruiters may decide to expect some level of interruptions as just par for the course. “The flexibility of the medium allows them to record day and night, but does mean you sometimes get unexpected interruptions from a friend or parent inadvertently appearing in the back of shot.”

Videos allow interviewers to take into account how the candidate is communicating. However, Edmondson warns of coming advancements in assessing communication. Video interviews may soon be subject to assessing candidates using biometrics, facial expressions, “but for me,” adds Edmondson, “that gets slightly dangerous” and needs more exploration.

Finally, Edmondson advises that employers considers cultural differences if their organizations operate in multiple countries. There are lot of different suppliers out there, so get a feel for the demos. It’s possible that videos may not be considered totally appropriate in certain areas. If that’s the case, consider not using them at all, or introducing them gradually. If certain candidates can’t access he media for any reason, you have to work around that too.

Video interviews shouldn’t be used in isolation, and are really at their best in the mid stages of a large scale selection process.

 

Posted April 05, 2017 by

Panel of Experts provides ongoing insight to College Recruiter

Growing your business or career

College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts brings together expert voices from around the country with insight around entry level talent acquisition—both from the employer’s perspective and the job seeker’s. Members of the panel have decades of experience in advising human resources or job seekers, and are recognized experts in their fields. They specialize in workforce solutions, best practices in diversity, university relations, internships, interviewing, resume writing, career development and more.

At College Recruiter we believe that every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We are excited to offer their deep insight to our readers and followers, who we believe will learn how to apply best practices to their own hiring approaches or job searches. Every month we will share a discussion with members of the Panel of Experts. Watch the videos, read the blog posts, and find all archived discussions on  LinkedIn for recruiters, LinkedIn for job seekers, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

Members of the panel:

Martin EdmondsonMartin Edmondson, Chief Executive at Gradcore. At Gradcore, Martin specializes in graduate recruitment, employment and employability, with the aim of maximizing graduate potential for organisations, universities and places. Martin has a wide range of experience and skills, gained from working across the public, private and third sectors.

 

Marky Stein, Fortune 100 Career Consultant. Marky Stein career consultantMarky is the author of “Fearless Interviewing”, named the #1 interviewing book of the “100 Best Career Books of All Time” by onlinecollege.com. Her book “From Freshman to Fortune 500: 7 Secrets to Success for Grads, Undergrads and Career Changers” is due May 2017.

 

 

Alexandra Levit career consultantAlexandra Levit, Consultant for all things workplace. Alexandra Levit’s goal is to prepare organizations and their employees for meaningful careers in the future workplace. A former nationally syndicated columnist for the Wall Street Journal and writer for the New York Times, Fast Company, and Forbes, Alexandra has authored several books, including the international bestseller “They Don’t Teach Corporate in College.”

 

Joanne Meehl career consultant

Joanne Meehl, MS, IJCDC, CPPA, Career Strategy Coach and President and primary Job Coach at Joanne Meehl Career Services. Joanne helps leaders market themselves for their next roles. She talks with hiring managers, internal and external recruiters, and HR directors about what they want. She translates this knowledge into guidance for her clients. She positions herself to her clients as a partner who gets her clients to decide and focus, see their own value, and communicate who they are in order to land the job they choose.  

 

Janine Truitt talent consultantJanine Truitt, Chief Innovations Officer at Talent Think Innovations. She is an entrepreneur, mentor, coach, speaker, blogger and brand influencer. She provides innovative, on-demand services, trainings, media and products that arm businesses with the timely knowledge and tools they need to succeed. She inspires individuals from the c-suite to stay-at-home moms to recognize and utilize their full potential by nudging them beyond their comfort zones and providing a practical way to achieve success.

 

Vicky Oliver career consultantVicky Oliver, Author of award-winning career development books. Her career advice has been featured in over 901 media outlets, including the New York Times Job Market section, Wall Street Journal, New York Post, and Esquire magazine. She has been interviewed on over 601 radio programs. Her first book, “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions” (Sourcebooks, 2005), is a national bestseller in its third U.S. printing.

 

Toni Newborn diversity managerToni Newborn, J.D., Diversity and Consulting Services Manager at City of St. Paul. She is currently serving as the Diversity and Consulting Services Manager for the City. In this role, she manages the consulting services division as well as create strategic plans to diversify the city’s work force from a racial equity lens.

 

 

 

Bruce Soltys, Head of Talent Acquisition Sourcing Strategies at Travelers.  He Bruce Soltys university recruitingLeads a team accountable for the design and delivery of the enterprise strategy for sourcing, attracting and recruiting a pool of diverse candidates through relationships with targeted colleges, universities, and student organizations across the country.

 

Jeff DunnJeff Dun campus relations manager at Intel, Campus Relations Manager for Intel Corporation.  Jeff has over 20 years of corporate recruiting experience.  He is a regular speaker on college campuses on successful job search strategies. He specializes in helping students with resume, networking, interviewing, LinkedIn and Branding strategies.

 

 

Robert Shindell

Robert Shindell is the President and CEO of Intern Bridge, a leading experiential education research and consulting firm. He has spent two decades in the career services and hiring space. He’s the principal investigator of the National Internship & Co-op Study, and is one of the most sought-after speakers and thought leaders in the country on internship management, entry-level hiring, and collegiate career services effectiveness.

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Posted April 13, 2016 by

College Recruiter sponsoring premiere event in Europe for university relations leaders

Brussels, BelgiumCollege Recruiter has two primary types of users: candidates who are searching for great careers and the employers who recruit them. One way that we give back to the recruiting community is by regularly sharing our knowledge and trying our best to advance the conversations through our blog, videos, and social media. Another way is through conferences such as the dozen or so College Recruiting Bootcamp events we’ve organized to-date.

A third way that give back to the recruiting community is through our active participation in conferences organized by partners. This weekend, for example, chief executive officer Faith Rothberg will moderate a panel at TAtech (the Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions) in Orlando about how job boards can and should prevent fraud including bogus jobs which are posted for a number of reasons, one of which is identity theft. On Monday, I’ll deliver a presentation at SHRM Talent Management in Orlando about how talent acquisition leaders can use metrics to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their departments but also to get that “seat at the table” that so many crave but haven’t been able to attain because the information they share with their C-level leaders has been tactical and not strategic. About a week later I’ll be in D.C. for TalentBlend 2016. College Recruiter is a sponsor and I’m moderating a panel discussion with Alton Fox of Lockheed Martin and Temeka Thompson of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission during which we’ll talk about how leading organizations recruit students and recent graduates through off-campus channels including interactive recruitment media such as College Recruiter.

Pretty much all of the above has a U.S. focus but we’re well aware that there’s a big, beautiful world outside of our borders. Indeed, most of our Fortune 1,000 and even federal government clients have hiring needs around the world and we’re increasingly being called upon to help them with those needs. Today, for example, we’re working on a proposal for a federal government agency that has significant hiring needs for people who are U.S. citizens, live or are willing to live abroad, have college degrees, and speak both English and Spanish. These multinational projects are challenging yet a lot of fun and have led us to engage with organizations in other countries whose missions include helping students and recent graduates find great careers. An example is Gradcore, a U.K.-based organization run by my friend, Martin Edmondson. I delivered the keynote presentation at their annual conference a couple of years ago and in May we are sponsoring and helping to organize their GEC Europe conference.  (more…)

Posted December 07, 2015 by

Value, experience, and cultural fit as reasons for hiring students early

Employers have their own criteria when searching for quality candidates. For example, candidates potentially adding value to a company will interest employers. Experience can also factor into hiring decisions. The more experience candidates have, the better their chances of landing new jobs. Fitting into the company culture is important too because employers need to know that prospective employees reflect a positive image of their companies. Value, experience, and cultural fit are three reasons for hiring students early. (more…)

Posted December 04, 2015 by

Recession and competitive job market as incentives for hiring students earlier

While employers may have their own reasons for hiring students well in advance of graduating, other variable factors can affect that decision as well. For example, the 2008 recession cost many people jobs, hurting the economy. On a positive note, it created opportunities for students to prove themselves as potential employees. Today, the economy in the United States is bouncing back and producing not only a competitive job market, but a race among employers to hire the best candidates. (more…)

Posted December 02, 2015 by

6 reasons employers hire students before graduation

Hiring the best candidates for jobs is essential to a company’s success. Employers prefer recruiting candidates sooner rather than later, even long before they graduate from college. There are various reasons why employers believe in hiring students as soon as possible. (more…)

Posted November 24, 2015 by

Employers eyeing emotional intelligence in candidates

Success in the workplace isn’t just about how smart you are, but it is also about handling your emotions. Employers are challenged in finding job candidates who display emotional intelligence (EQ). This means understanding people’s emotions and responding to them appropriately. Candidates with mental and emotional intelligence may separate themselves from the competition. (more…)

Posted November 20, 2015 by

North American employers looking for leaders

Employers in North America are searching for job candidates who possess leadership skills, even when hiring for entry-level positions. While research suggests the need for leadership in the workplace, employers are learning it is not easy to find in every pool of candidates. (more…)

Posted November 18, 2015 by

Big data facing big shortage of skilled workers

Have you heard the phrase do the math? That’s what North American employers are looking for; people to do the math in the field of big data. A shortage of skilled workers in the field presents job opportunities in mathematics, one of the STEM fields. (more…)