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Posted April 03, 2017 by

Gender diversity in tech: one simple part of the solution

 

Gender diversity in tech companies has been a major issue for over two decades now. One part of solution to recruit more women in tech is a simple concept: more effective structured interviews.

The numbers don’t add up. The EEOC reports that women currently make up roughly 56% of the overall workforce, but are underrepresented in tech. Only about 28% of proprietary software jobs currently held by women.

Why is it important to have gender diversity in tech?

The financials tend to resonate more in enterprise companies. Various reports, including one from Catalyst and one from McKinsey, have shown that companies with more female leadership tend to outperform both their market and their rivals. An additional study, from the Peterson Institute for International Economics, showed companies with 30% or more females in leadership outperformed rivals by an average 6% net profit margin.

Women are often associated with being empathetic leaders. This is not true of all women of course, and many men are also empathetic. But if we can generally associated empathy with female leadership, we see a compelling reason to recruit more women in technology. Half of the ten most empathetic technology companies are also the fastest growing. They have grown about 23.3% per year, compared to a weighted average of 5.2% growth of all technology companies, according to one study.

Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter and named by RecruitingDaily as a top woman in HR technology worth watching, remarked: “While I know many men who are empathetic, including my husband, I’ve generally seen a higher degree of empathy from female leaders I’ve known and worked with. When you look at these 4x growth stats for companies led from a more empathetic place, and factor in the power of technology in terms of growing a company, having more females at the helm of these types of organizations seems both crucial and a no-brainer.”

Why is diversity in tech seemingly so far behind?

This is often framed as a “pipeline problem,” and that might be true. For example: according to Girls Who Code, 74% of young women (i.e. high-school aged and lower) express interest in STEM (technological) courses and career paths, but by the time decisions need to be made about taking those classes in college, only 18% choose STEM/computer science pathways. (And that’s actually dropped: in the 1980s, women held 37% of computer science degrees, for example.) 

What can be done about the technology gap for women? (more…)

Posted February 27, 2017 by

College Recruiter CEO to speak about gender diversity at NACE conference

 

Minneapolis, MN (February 25, 2017)—Interactive recruitment media company College Recruiter announced today that CEO Faith Rothberg will speak at this year’s conference for the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), held June 6-9 in Las Vegas. The NACE conference is for college career services and college recruiters to make new connections, develop new insight and skills and discover new business solutions. Rothberg will speak about diversifying the workforce.

According to Rothberg, “When you pretend gender diversity doesn’t matter, your bottom line suffers. So recruiting and retaining women isn’t just the right thing to do – it is essential to increasing your profitability.  Including women in all areas of your organization adds valuable differing insights to solve our tough business problems.”

As CEO of a technology driven business, Rothberg has an inspirational personal story to share. Her career has remained at the intersection between business and technology, both of which were male-dominated fields when she entered them and, unfortunately, remain so in 2017. After earning her MBA, Rothberg became a manufacturing information technology consultant in a job that required working out of construction trailers at manufacturing facilities. Rothberg now leads College Recruiter and takes pride in helping launch the early careers of college students, including thousands of young women. STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) are heavily dominated by men, and Rothberg will share about the challenges she has faced while climbing to the top.

Although less attention is paid on this topic outside of STEM, many non-STEM industries are just as lacking in gender diversity. Rothberg will identify the industries and fields that are lagging, and discuss some of the research around why organizations need to diversify their talent pipeline. She will speak directly to recruiters who influence that entry point into the pipeline, as well as retention strategies.

Rothberg’s focus for the discussion will go beyond merely discussing the problem. She will bring specific examples of how small, medium, and large organizations have successfully improved their recruitment and retention of women. She will discuss the implementation of innovative programs that will improve their recruitment and retention of female students and recent graduates.

About College Recruiter

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent grad deserves a great career. They believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience. Their interactive media solutions connect students and grads to great careers. College Recruiter is the leading, interactive, recruitment media company used by college students and recent graduates to find great careers. Their clients are primarily colleges, universities, and employers who want to recruit dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year.

About NACE

Established in 1956, NACE connects more than 7,600 college career services professionals at nearly 2,000 colleges and universities nationwide, more than 3,000 university relations and recruiting professionals, and the business affiliates that serve this community. NACE forecasts hiring and trends in the job market; tracks starting salaries, recruiting and hiring practices, and student attitudes and outcomes; and identifies best practices and benchmarks.