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Posted June 19, 2016 by

6 hiring trends job seekers should watch for in 2016

“Congratulations! We are pleased to inform you that you are hired in our organization.”

No matter how many times you have read these magical words, they sound just as thrilling as you read them the first time. If you intend to read them again in your mail this year, then luckily the time is right for you to make a job transition.

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

2016 brings a wave of new opportunities. As unemployment hits the lowest record since the last five years, there is more scope for job seekers to find better work opportunities; hiring is on the rise. However, this is not the only good news of the New Year. There are also the growing economic conditions that will have a positive impact on the pay scale and perks of employees, making it a perfect time to switch jobs.

On one hand, this is a sigh of relief for job seekers who lived through the ordeal of recession and unemployment in the past couple of years. It also poses many challenges to recruiters who will have to revisit their company policies to compete in the market.

Without further ado, let’s find out what other hiring trends the year holds for the job seekers:

1. Social media will rule the roost

Social media is ubiquitous. As it emerges as a new tool for hiring talent, your social presence will have a say in the success of your job application. Now is the time to update your social profiles as employers will be evaluating you through your presence on major social media platforms.

Having an impressive online profile will not only increase your outreach to potential employers, but it will also get you in front of lucrative job opportunities offered by leading organizations. Therefore, it is high time for you to create strong profiles on leading social media websites, such as LinkedIn and Twitter.

2. Hiring for remote workers will increase

With improvement in collaboration tools, remote employees have evolved as an alternative workforce. No longer do recruiters have to resort to “in-house hiring” process which is both costly and time-consuming for the companies. Since employers can freelance work, the remote work culture will continue to thrive in 2016.

So, if you are a part-time academic writer who offers assignment assistance with quality, you can make it a full-time job this year by finding freelance work opportunities.

3. Flexible work will no longer be a dream

In 2016, the employee’s fantasy of flexible work will become a corporate reality. With changing corporate cultures and attitudes, more businesses are inclining their hiring policies towards flexible work programs. The current year will see a rapid growth in businesses offering flexible hours and alternative work spaces which help them accommodate talent who cannot work under the regular work scenarios.

4. Boomerang hires will be on the rise

According to a survey by Workplace Trends, 76% of the companies are welcoming of the employees who once worked with them. As this hiring trend increases in popularity, more job seekers look for rehiring opportunities for their next job role.

5. Video resumes will become more trendy

With hiring getting more personal, more recruiters will expect to see video resumes of job seekers. In fact, a number of companies have already made video resume a compulsory thing in their job description. So, if you have not yet created a personalized video of your career description, it is about time to shoot a video long enough to demonstrate your professional skills and personal traits.

6. Referral hiring will take the lead

Referral hiring cuts down on the recruitment budget that employers have to bear with traditional hiring. With every passing year, it is emerging as a primary source of hiring workers. If implemented effectively, the referral hiring can significantly save the time and money of a company. As companies come to realize the valuable benefits of this form of hiring, more businesses will be investing in referral programs to hire talent.

2016 is a happening year for job seekers. Get ready for the above-mentioned six trends to make your way to a successful career transition this year.

Kaelynn Bailee, guest writer

Kaelynn Bailee, guest writer

  Kaelynn Bailee is a HR manager working for a new start up that provides both educators and learners a platform to meet and discuss everything education. She also loves blogging and from time to time writes for other blogs.

Posted May 09, 2016 by

6 common mistakes grads make when searching for entry-level jobs

First Job word; business man touching on red tab virtual screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

PhuShutter/Shutterstock.com

Recently, research from the Australian government shows how the shift from college education to full-time employment is becoming more challenging. Job prospects for young Australians are decreasing and on the other hand, recent graduates are making key mistakes when searching for entry-level jobs. Open Colleges, one of Australia’s leading online educators, has gathered information from a variety of recruiters to help recent graduates understand their mistakes when applying for entry-level jobs. Avoid these most common mistakes to avoid when searching for entry-level jobs.

1. Negative attitude towards work

Australian government research confirmed young people do not have enough of a positive attitude towards work. Recruiters recommend job seekers be more motivated and demonstrate enthusiasm to potential employers.

According to the study, young people need to be more responsible and reliable concerning their behavior and approach to their jobs. Recruiters suggest working with a business for a while, coming in to shifts, being punctual, and showing respect to colleagues, and customers or clients.

2. Think learning is over after college

Recruiters ask young professionals to be more open to learning when they start their first entry-level jobs. We all need to continue learning during our professional lives to stay updated with industry changes. But when starting a new job, it is especially important to have the right attitude towards learning because everything is new; employees will need to gain knowledge of the working process in their new companies and the different procedures to complete work correctly and in a timely manner. Your first employer is giving you an excellent opportunity to learn and gain valuable experience, so absorb as much as you can.

3. Underestimate the importance of previous work experience

Even though job seekers are applying for their first full-time entry-level jobs, having some related work experience will give them a competitive advantage. This may be some volunteer work done while still in school or some unpaid jobs during the summer. Don’t underestimate this experience; include it on your resume and tell your interviewers about it.

Studies are essential, but having first-hand experience shows employers that you have some practical skills and a better understanding of work responsibilities and professional work life.

4. Failure to make a good first impression

Whoever says his opinion is not influenced by the first impression is lying. In an interview, job seekers only have a few seconds to convince interviewers that they are the right candidates, so along with their studies, work experience, and the right attitude, their presentations during interviews will play an important role in their success in landing their first full-time jobs.

According to the research, recent graduates often dress inappropriately for work and have untidy hair, so recruiters recommend paying special attention to appearance. Not every company’s dress code is the same, so make sure to verify details about the company culture before an interview in order to dress appropriately.

5. Poor job search and application skills

When looking for their first jobs, Australian young professionals are making very common mistakes, according to research. These skills improve with time and practice, but a couple pieces of advice recruiters give are: make sure each application (resume and cover letter) is tailored to the position for which you are applying, and always double check your application’s spelling and grammar. Recruiters see these types of mistakes as a lack of attention to detail and unacceptable in today’s marketplace.

Recruiters also suggest job seekers approach employers directly after providing their resumes and personally following up with them.

6. Unrealistic work expectations

When applying for their first entry-level jobs after college, recent graduates need to understand they cannot “start at the top.” They have to make an effort to work their way up through the business.

Another common mistake is to expect high compensation. This will also come with time as employees gain experience and assume more responsibilities. The nature of the work they do may not be exactly what they want initially, but as long as workers are learning and doing something they like, they are on the right path.

Need more tips for your job search? Check out our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Maria Onzain, guest writer

Maria Onzain, guest writer

Maria Onzain is a content marketing expert writing for Open Colleges about education, career, and productivity. She is passionate about all things digital, loves technology, social media, start-ups, travelling, and good food.

Posted April 30, 2016 by

3 employment options for recent grads

Graduation male student with different careers to choose courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Tom Wang/Shutterstock.com

Considering the economy and technology are on the upswing, many recent grads start their careers while studying at college. And we are not talking about part-time at the campus café; college students often have jobs that bring them valuable professional experience, and ensure a tangible level of income. So when graduation day comes, college students are not a bunch of scared rookies but professionals with decent backgrounds in their fields. Nevertheless, there is still a question: what form of employment is worth the effort? Startups and freelancing look more attractive, yet they conceal many tricky pitfalls. As for good old full-time employment, it needs serious reshaping and improvement to attract young professionals. There are at least three employment options for recent grads, but which option is best?

It is all in the mindset

According to recent surveys, three out of five students expect they will be able to work remotely, and less than a half of 18-29 year olds employed are working full-time. It is not a crisis or an unexpected epidemic given that youth follow the elder generations; Gen Z (this is how sociologists and HR experts categorize people born in the mid to late 1990s through the 2010s) had a Millennials rise as a model to follow. The same surveys indicate about 30% of Gen Y started businesses while in college, and about 91% are considering changing their current jobs within three years. With this in mind, we can tell the younger generation has been raised in the spirit of freedom and solopreneurship, now demanding a different approach from HR departments and recruiters. Yet, the last say goes to employees, and here are things they should consider before accepting job offers and jump into their careers or solo businesses. Let’s take a look at each of the following three employment options for recent grads to consider.

Start a company

Starting your own company is rather challenging, though many examples have proven it to be successful. The idea is to push your passion into profit and convince others that your business is worth all the efforts.

Startup advantages:

– Working for yourself
– Creating great financial opportunities
– Implementing your own ideas
– Great life experience

Startup disadvantages:

– Tough competition
– Investments needed
– Lack of “job security”
– Startup is riskier and more costly

Understand that starting your own business calls for an award-winning concept necessary to enter the entrepreneurial world. Those who choose to make such a living should be patient, as niche startups are likely to bear fruit no sooner than 12 months after launch.

Freelancing

Freelancing is actually quite similar to starting your own business. On the one hand, it comes rather risky though you do not have to invest. On the other hand, you are free to follow your commitments with passion and drive.

Freelancing advantages:

– Benefit from flexible hours (Sleep until noon, if you like. No one will ever bother you unless the project deadline is approaching)
– Take control of your customers and tasks (Choose whom you are going to work with and opt for the most appealing tasks)
– Keep all the profits (You are the boss. You don’t have to split the profit or pay salaries, yet be aware of taxation and other expenses)
– Stay wherever you want (Freelancing is perfect for a travelling enthusiast)

Freelancing disadvantages:

– Lack of steady workloads (At some point, you can suffer from the lack of orders unless you’ve managed to create a solid customer base)
– Insecurity (There are numerous occasions when freelancers are not paid or become victims of fraud)
– You pay for yourself (No social package or any other benefits provided by the employer. You’re the boss, remember?)

Full-time job

The most influential thing about a full-time job is a contract and guaranteed salary in addition to employer’s benefits, a workplace provided, and more. However, the current economic situation will hardly provide you with total job and financial security, while being hopeless in enabling your professional development.

Full-time advantages:

– Steady salary (Your monthly payment is guaranteed)
– Governmental and social securities (Your contact is protected by social and economic policies)
– Constant workload (You will never witness a lack of tasks and duties)

Full-time disadvantages:

– Heavy workload (Too much work is not good for you. It results in stress and health problems in addition to a lack of personal time)
– Lack of professional development (You can stick to a routine without the slightest chance to develop your skills)
– Not enough salary (You will hardly find employees who are satisfied with their monthly salaries. Always keep in mind that every employer is eager to cut down on expenses. Salary is a key point in the list of expenses)

Each working arrangement comes with pros and cons. The best way to make up your mind is to consider every point we have discussed. No matter what you choose, get pleasure from what you are doing and never hesitate to make a crucial step and change your life for the better.

Need more advice regarding employment options? Search for jobs with College Recruiter and check out our blog. Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Justine Thomas, guest writer

Justine Thomas, guest writer

Justine Thomas is a blogger and freelance writer. Her main interests are foreign languages, psychology, and fitness. Currently, she is working at educational company, Edubirdie.com, as a consulting editor.

Posted February 23, 2016 by

4 ways to overcome lack of experience

Have you ever interviewed for a job and been rejected because of your lack of work experience?

When you’re applying for entry-level jobs or internships as a college student or recent grad, this is a pretty common experience. Even though the career services office on your campus may have barked at you incessantly about applying for internships and part-time job opportunities, and your parents breathed down your neck over break about doing seasonal work to make some extra money, you may find yourself with very little work experience to list on your resume at this point.

If that’s the case, today’s Tuesday Tip video and article are for you. College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, offers four quick tips in a 5-minute video.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Lack experience? Get some.

Alanis Morissette should have added this to her lyrical list of ironies back in 1995. Recruiters don’t have much sympathy for job seekers without experience listed on their resumes, though. If you lack experience prior to the job search, the best remedy is to seek experience. The sooner you can gain experience, the better.

The worst thing you can do for yourself is to allow yourself the luxury of feeling bad about your lack of experience. The best thing you can do for yourself is to take action. A great first step is to register at CollegeRecruiter.com and search for job opportunities in your area.

2. List all experience.

If you can’t find a full-time job, settle for part-time employment. Combine a few part-time jobs if necessary. It’s best to find part-time employment in your preferred career field, of course, because this allows you to build a repertoire of skills you can use in that great entry-level full-time job you’ll land soon.

If you can’t find a paid part-time position, consider volunteering with a non-profit organization. You might be able to use the skills gained in your academic major to help the organization; this experience can be listed on your resume as well.

Don’t forget to list other experience on your resume as well, including paid and unpaid internships and your involvement in organizations both on-campus and off-campus.

3. Compensate with strong soft skills.

Soft skills are skills which you may have acquired as a college student (but not necessarily in the classroom); these skills are a combination of personality traits and habits which make you a quality employee and a pleasant person to interact with. Research shows that people with excellent soft skills tend to perform well at work; in fact, people with strong soft skills perform just as well (and sometimes better than) people with strong technical skills.

Some of the soft skills recruiters and talent acquisition professionals are looking for including communication skills, a strong work ethic, time management ability, problem-solving skills, and ability to work well under pressure.

When you’re in an interview, think about how you can sell yourself by demonstrating your soft skills. Think in advance how you would answer questions like, Tell me about a time when you faced a difficult problem. How did you solve it?

4. Seek additional training opportunities.

If you lack training which applies to the job opportunities you’re seeking, get some! There are multiple ways to seek training. You can take an extra college course in journalism, for example, if you want to write for your local newspaper but keep getting rejected when you apply for writing positions. You might also scour the internet and newspapers for local writers groups. These groups are free to join, and not only will you learn from other writers, but you might enjoy the fellowship and constructive criticism.

Ultimately, if you lack experience related to your career field, no one can gain it on your behalf.

It’s your responsibility to stake your claim in the world of work.

Taking steps in the direction of gaining work experience can be intimidating, but you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment each time you take one more step.

Why not take one more step forward today?

Work on the draft of your resume. Submit your final draft to the free resume editors at College Recruiter. Make an appointment with the career services department at your local university. Find out when the career fair will be hosted on your campus this spring. Register and search for jobs on College Recruiter’s website.

For more Tuesday Tips, subscribe to College Recruiter’s YouTube Channel, follow our blog, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

 

 

Posted January 21, 2016 by

Recruiters’ quick tips for job seekers

Laura Schnaible, Recruiting Specialist, The New England Center for Children, Inc.

Laura Schnaible, Recruiting Specialist, The New England Center for Children, Inc.

When preparing to enter the workforce after college graduation, and when preparing for internship application season, many students appreciate pointers from true experts. Two members of the recruiting team from the New England Center for Children (NECC), Laura Schnaible, Recruiting Specialist, and Kaitlyn Maloney, Human Resources Coordinator, share some of their top tips for soon-to-be grads and internship candidates preparing for the job search process.

What are your 3 top tips for new college graduates about how to prepare for the job search process in January if they plan to graduate in May? 

  1. Students should have an updated current resume targeting specific fields/industries, if they are able to research organizations ahead of time and have a specific one for that company.
  2. Dress appropriately for colleges fairs, interviews, etc.  Lean more on the conservative side.
  3. Make use of career services at your college/university. They can help direct you when it comes to resumes, career events, job opportunities, and the appropriate ways to follow up with potential employers.

If students want to work for The New England Center for Children as a summer intern, when should they apply? Please describe the application process. 

Our internship program is very competitive, and we strongly recommend applying in January or prior within the fall semester, since an on-site interview is required.  It is important to review the position information, and to reach out to the internship coordinator with your contact information and resume.

Have you hired an intern who later became a star employee? Please share your internship success story with us. 

Kaitlyn Maloney, Human Resources Coordinator-Recruiting, The New England Center for Children, Inc.

Kaitlyn Maloney, Human Resources Coordinator-Recruiting, The New England Center for Children, Inc.

We have hired many full and part-time interns as employees. We pride ourselves on being a company that promotes within, and we have had numerous interns turn into staff who grow into supervisory positions, complete on-site Master’s programs, and truly become leaders at the organization.

For more tips from recruiting experts, follow College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. Stick with College Recruiter this month as we help you connect the dots on your path to career success.

In 2007, like most employees at The New England Center for Children (NECC®), Kaitlyn and Laura began their careers as teachers in the residential program for students who have a moderate to severe diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder.  Kaitlyn received her undergraduate degree in Criminal Justice and Psychology at Westfield State University, and Laura attended Valparaiso University, receiving her degree in Business Administration and Psychology.  During their years at NECC, both have taken advantage of the significant graduate school tuition reimbursement benefit; Kaitlyn received her Master’s of Education with a concentration in Mental Health Counseling from Cambridge College, and Laura received her Master’s of Science in Education with a concentration in Severe Special Needs from Simmons College (one of NECC’s on-site graduate programs).  After working in the residential program, and at NECC’s second school facility in Abu Dhabi, Kaitlyn joined the Human Resources Recruitment Department in 2014 as a Human Resources Coordinator, and has the main focus of creating relationships with numerous college and university programs within the Northeast.  Laura has been in the Recruiting Specialist role for seven years and focuses on building long-reaching partnerships with programs throughout the United States and Canada.  Both work daily meeting college students in person and guiding them toward the many internship and career opportunities at NECC.

For those interested in learning more about internships, career opportunities, and the numerous benefits NECC offers, please visit www.necc.org.

 

Posted February 03, 2015 by

Top 10 Internship Tips

Happy medical intern doctor writing on clipboard

Happy medical intern doctor writing on clipboard. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Most companies seek interns who are motivated and determined. About 55% of interns who successfully performed their duties are offered a full-time position. In this article we will go through top 10 internship tips. (more…)

Posted July 09, 2014 by

How you can develop in a career as an insurance adjuster

Loss adjuster inspecting car involved in an accident

Loss adjuster inspecting car involved in an accident. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The insurance industry is an ever growing one with more people wanting to insure everything that they value most and this also makes this industry a very lucrative one especially if you wish to make a career in this field. With the boom in the insurance market, employment opportunities have also increased tenfold. When it comes to the field of insurance, you can be assured that with a financial background in banking, insurance and the likes, you will have several career options at your disposal and you can essentially select the one that fits your personality and choices well. If you would like to do some quality reading in order to understand every aspect of the realm of insurance then you should certainly consider visiting http://cheapautoinsuranceusa.com to get a complete and clear picture of what to expect in a career in this field. (more…)

Posted July 09, 2014 by

3 Reasons Why Graduates Should Find an Internship

If you are a college graduate looking to get some work experience and potentially discover a career, the following post shares three reasons why you should find an internship.

Featured: Featured Students always ask me if they should try to intern after college. My response is that it always depends on the student’s circumstance and previous experience. One of our campus ambassadors from UCF just graduated and is interning at UniversalMusic Groupthis summer. I asked Kailee why she decided to intern after graduation and

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Posted May 13, 2014 by

Why Community College is a Wise Choice for Students

While prospective students are told about attending four year colleges, attending a community college just might be the best choice for getting a higher education.  In the following infographic, find out some reasons why students are attending these schools, and more. (more…)

Posted May 13, 2014 by

Class of 2014 Expects to Find Entry Level Jobs in Their Career Fields, but Will They?

As the class of 2014 prepares to graduate, most of them believe they will find entry level jobs within their career fields.  However, is this a realistic expectation for these soon to be college graduates?  The following post has more information.

Graduates, she says, may be buoyed by improved jobs numbers recently, but they still face some uncertainties. Upcoming graduates are placing stock in job training because they intend to stay longer in their entry-level jobs.

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