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Posted July 01, 2016 by

4 beautiful truths of networking

Networking is an essential skill we must all hone in life. It is a trait that takes practice and patience. Due to the variety of different personality types, networking does come more naturally to some rather than others. So with a few tips and practice, anyone can learn to network in a more effective manner. In this short video, college student Macie Brooke Edgewater shares four beautiful truths of networking to help anyone become a little more comfortable with networking.


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  1. In social networking, always be your authentic self. We all have certain traits that are uniquely us that can contribute to building a repertoire. If you have a tendency toward joking around people, use that natural skill to your advantage, and make them laugh. Let your new contact see the side of you that can adapt to the conversation. If you tend to have a more serious approach, exposing that side of your personality up front, will give your new relationship a solid foundation to build upon, as well.
  2. Kindness goes a long way. Be kind to everyone you meet. A smile, a nod, a simple hello can be a potentially fantastic start to a brand new relationship. Yes, some of us are a bit introverted, but getting out of your comfort zone and practicing these simple greetings will help you practice and it will also open up the door for more opportunities to socialize. Make the effort to be outgoing. It becomes easier over time.
  3. Make sure you listen to the conversation you’re participating in. People truly enjoy telling their story, so let them.
  4. When you find yourself at a loss for words, or shyness kicks in, ask one of four questions to get the conversation flowing again. Who, where, what, and why can start an entirely new conversation. Never get offended. If you find that you have made a new contact and they have not responded to your last effort to converse, do not take it personally. We are a very busy society, and we must remember that other people’s time is just as valuable as our own.

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Macie Brooke Edgewater is a psychology major at UACCB and is currently pursuing her degree in order to work as a high school counselor. She enjoys the outdoors, reading, writing, training dogs, and music of the metal persuasion. Concerts are a favorite pastime. She is well versed in many trades but especially enjoys interviewing bands.

Posted December 05, 2014 by

College Acceptance and Friendship: The Social Trap

Close-up of an 'Approved' College Application letter

Close-up of an ‘Approved’ College Application letter. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

This time of year, seniors probably have their SAT scores or will be receiving them very soon. And, within a few days, most seniors will be sending out the last of their college applications. There is a nerve-wracking waiting period between December 1st and early spring, when acceptance letters arrive. Most students worry about where they will be attending college next year but don’t think much about their student colleagues. However, maintaining friendships during this time can be tricky. (more…)

Posted April 14, 2014 by

Don’t Think Twitter is an Effective Tool for Your Entry Level Job Search? 7 Steps to Follow for Success

If Twitter is not a part of your entry level job search, learn seven steps to use on the site to help you find success with it in the following post.

When I talk with job seekers about Twitter, I often get a curious look. I try walking them through my process for building their personal network or connecting with potential new employer, but that doesn’t seem to work. Twitter is often one of those things people don’t get until they dig

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Posted February 26, 2014 by

The 5 Stages of Job Hunting Grief – And How to Cope with Them

Woman crying at work after being dismissed

Woman crying at work after being dismissed. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

You’ve undoubtedly heard of the five stages of grieving the loss of a loved one – denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. These were defined by Elizabeth Kübler-Ross way back in 1969, and quickly became a universally accepted model for how people deal with death. You may have even seen people apply these stages to other kinds of loss, such as job loss. But there’s another kind of grief that’s increased in prominence during the Great Recession but hasn’t been as clearly defined: job hunting grief. (more…)

Posted January 27, 2014 by

Starting a New Entry Level Job and Desire to Make Friends? What You Should Know

If you want to make friends on your new entry level job, the following post answers some questions you might have concerning this effort.

Whether you’re at your first job fresh out of college or on your fifth career change, everyone worries about how well they’ll get along with coworkers. Sometimes, you really hit it off and stay friends forever, even well after you’ve left the job; other times, you dread going into the office each day because

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Posted November 08, 2013 by

Beginning Entry Level Jobs? Remember 7 Rules to Create Meaningful Professional Relationships: 2nd Rule

When networking on your entry level jobs, are you developing relationships that mean something to your career?  If not, the following post shares the second of seven rules to help you create meaningful, professional relationships.

By Michael Moshiri, Founder of Big 4 Confidential Professional relationships have the potential to help you improve your performance, achieve remarkable professional growth, and advance quickly in your firm. But very few relationships ever live up to this tremendous potential because of a common error many professionals make: waiting for the other person to

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