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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 28, 2016 by

11 quick LinkedIn tips

Linkedin website on a computer screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Ingvar Bjork/Shutterstock.com

Did you know 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to look for candidates? This means companies can find job seekers’ profiles and invite them for job interviews. For this to happen, though, job seekers need to make their profiles look appropriate. Adding their pictures and job titles is not enough anymore, as their LinkedIn profiles can be more important than their resumes. If job seekers want recruiters to visit their pages often and offer them great positions, here are some things they should consider.

1. Recommendations

Employers tend to pay a lot of attention not only to job seekers’ professional skills, but also to their corporate backgrounds. If applicants have proven to be excellent team workers at their previous jobs, they should seek recommendations from former bosses or colleagues. Ask some of them to write a couple of nice recommendations. Don’t exaggerate here, though. If applicants have had five jobs so far but have 15 recommendations, it might seem weird.

2. Write a longer headline

If you already have a job, but are open to new offerings, don’t just mention the company and your position there; it might be not enough to see what you do. Instead of writing, for example, “PR Manager at Example Company,” write “PR manager at Example Company: Helping big and small companies.”

3. Have enough connections

Having 50 connections on LinkedIn makes job seekers seem unfriendly, unprofessional, and unmotivated. Having 3000 contacts makes them look like they add everyone to their list of connections, and they don’t even care who’s there. Try to have a moderate number of connections, and you will be visible enough to make the network help your professional growth. Try to find all of your friends, former classmates, and colleagues if you’ve already worked somewhere.

4. Write only true information

We don’t want to lecture job seekers, but lying is unacceptable in the professional world. It concerns their LinkedIn profiles, too, particularly education and previous jobs. It is not only that recruiters can check everything, but it is also about ethics. Earning trust is an important step to professional success.

5. Be brief

No one likes to read lots of text, especially if it is not formatted correctly. Even if job seekers had tons of experience and they want to talk about it, they should organize it. Write a job title and describe your responsibilities point by point. Use headlines and short sentences; they are easier to comprehend.

6. Students can mention all the jobs they’ve had

Surely, when you are a big boss with 10 jobs behind, you can skip some of the gigs you’ve had such as pizza delivery or tutoring in college. However, college students or recent graduates might want to add at least some things to their work experience. Besides, most students do something during their college years. If they managed to study and freelance at the same time, they should mentions that. If students helped their professors grade papers, they can write about that too. Don’t leave a page blank; add at least something.

7. Choose the right picture for your profile

Don’t pick an Instagram-style photo or a cute picture with your pets; post casual photos on Facebook or elsewhere. Low-quality pictures are also not the best choice. Think of how you want potential employers to see you. The photo should be a recent, high-quality photograph where one can clearly see your face. You can also add a background picture; the best choice would be either a picture from some conference you participated in or some nature pic.

8. Write about your main skills, not all of them

We all know you are a talented person. However, if you are trying for an accountant job, recruiters probably don’t need to know you are a good cook. At the top of your LinkedIn page, your potential employer or recruiters need to see those skills suitable for them. Also, don’t mention the skills you don’t want to use in your next job. If you are tired of your current work where you need to design, for example, exclude this skill from your profile.

9. Add a decent email address

If your personal email address is dirtykitten@email.com or something like that, you probably want to get a new one. You must have had a laugh creating it, but now it is time to be more professional and to use your own name for your email address.

10. Don’t mention your age

Although all the companies say age discrimination doesn’t exist, that is not true. They always consider age when hiring. So, try not to mention it.

11. Make sure all is correct

Making mistakes in a LinkedIn profile is a no-no. Pay attention not only to grammar and spelling, but to style and formatting. Everything should be clear and understandable. Style should be formal and professional.

Try to look at your text as an objective reader, or better yet, show it to someone. Ask a friend, colleague, or professor to read it and correct the mistakes you might have missed.

A LinkedIn profile is much more important now than it was a couple of years ago. More and more professionals, companies, and headhunters create accounts and use them actively every day. Job seekers probably want to look equally experienced and professional on their pages, so spend enough time creating them and don’t be lazy.

Looking for more LinkedIn tips for your job search? Turn to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of William Sarto

William Sarto, guest writer

William Sarto is a marketer and content strategist working at the freelance writing board – gohunters.com. He shares his knowledge and experience in his articles based on current marketing trends and also provides actionable tips for students willing to build successful business careers. He is passionate about all new techniques and methods appearing in digital marketing. Working in one of the most fast changing industries requires many skills from young specialists, so if you have any questions feel free to contact Will @ twitter, Google+

Posted December 15, 2015 by

How to make more money with an English major doing freelance writing

Some people may be looking for alternatives to their regular nine-to-five jobs. One option could be freelance writing. Freelance writing not only offers flexibility but can be financially rewarding, depending on how much time and effort writers give it. In the following webinar, How to make more money with an English major doing freelance writing, English majors learn how to navigate the challenges of making money with an English major and the similarities and differences between freelance writing and writing as a full-time job. They will also get an expert’s opinion on building a freelance writing business right out of college and how to figure out if freelance writing is right for them. (more…)

Posted January 28, 2015 by

Career Perspectives for College Graduates: Explore the Writing Field!

Female working at home. She is writing a blog

Female working at home. She is writing a blog. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

It was hard to be a college student, but it’s even more challenging to be a recent graduate, isn’t it? We all had great goals for the careers we would aim for, but the reality is harsh. Most of us are still far from our dream jobs, but have student debts to pay off, so we need to look for temporary solutions.

For me, one of those solutions was blogging and freelance writing. As soon as I started exploring the opportunities in the writing field, I looked at this job from a whole other aspect: it appeared as an exciting, challenging and perspective career with a huge potential for growth.

After long years of studying sessions, taking exams and writing academic papers, this career may not seem worthy of your skills. Trust me: if you have a thing for writing, then you should definitely explore what this market has to offer. In the continuation, I will tell you how you can use your talent to start making safe and steady income after graduation. (more…)

Posted September 18, 2013 by

Work on your own terms: 5 great freelance careers

Businessman holding a chalkboard with the word Freelance on it

Businessman holding a chalkboard with the word Freelance on it. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

More Americans want to work from home, and more businesses are happy to oblige. A recent study conducted by Intuit found that by the year 2020, over 40 percent of the US workforce — that’s 60 million people — will be freelancers, contractors and temp workers. Whether your goal is to work from home, be your own boss or take a job that doesn’t require you to keep a rigid schedule, freelancing is an intriguing option.

Some careers are easier to go freelance than others. But when you find the sweet spot of freelance work, you may never want a typical nine-to-five again. Check out some top picks for freelance work and learn more about the training you can pursue to get you there. (more…)

Posted July 02, 2013 by

3 Summer Jobs for College Students that Could Lead to Permanent Employment

Working during the summer is a great way to gain some real world experience.  The following post has three summer jobs for college students that may lead them to permanent employment.

Summer is a great time for budding entrepreneurs to pull in a little extra cash while developing their business skills in real-world settings. But you don’t have to give up this income stream just because you’re heading off to college. In fact, there are plenty of different ways aspiring entrepreneurs can turn a

Read the article:

3 Ways to Turn a Summer Gig Into Long-Term Work

Posted January 05, 2009 by

Things to Consider Before Becoming a Full-Time Freelance Writer

Deciding to write freelance on a full time basis is a big decision. There’s more to it than simply waking up one day and saying “I think I’ll be a freelance writer full time,” and then doing it. And if you have a family, the decision is even tougher.
In her article for the December 2008 issue of The Writer magazine, C. Hope Clark, herself a full-time freelance writer, gives aspiring full-time freelancers some things to think about before they “take the plunge.”
The first question Clark recommends writers ask themselves is if their day jobs are really so bad.
Other questions to ask yourself:

  • Why do I want to leave my current job?
  • Do I crave the freelance life because I want to write or because I want to get away from my boss and[/or] coworkers?

Next, Clark advises making two lists – one that details what makes the daily 9-to-5 so bad and one that details what makes it good.
Some things to consider:

  • Will I miss the positives of my day job?
  • Will I get rid of all the things I hate?
  • What will I lose by becoming a freelancer? (like health benefits)

People who have families should definitely find out what their families think. That’s not the same as asking for their permission or soliciting support, Clark says. It just means that their feelings and thoughts are important and will be considered before a final decision is made.
Clark asked her family’s opinion and as a result, they relocated so her husband could accept a promotion and reduce the strain on the family budget. Not everyone can be so fortunate, so it’s a good idea to calculate the money that will be lost by leaving your day job in order to be a full-time freelance writer. Also, be sure to save at least “six months of expenses” before taking that first fateful step. Success rarely, if ever, happens right away and bills will still have to be paid.
Freelance writing is a business like any other. Clients and editors need to be responded to in a timely manner, accounts need to be organized and accurate, and deadlines have to be met.
There are many other things that Clark says a freelance writer has to think about, like training to stay up-to-date with industry changes, start-up expenses, and “what small-business licenses and fees may be required in your town, county and state.” Being uninformed could be costly. Finally, she suggests writing a business plan.
Becoming a full-time freelance writer is more than a notion. Clark recommends visiting the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Web site (www.sba.gov) to connect with a mentor and join professional organizations.