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Posted March 19, 2016 by

6 part-time jobs for college students in 2016

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Are you a college student who needs a little bit of extra money? Sometimes, students can find a work-study position or other type of on-campus job, but those are sometimes few and far between, especially at colleges with large student bodies. If students haven’t found jobs on campus they like, it’s time to look elsewhere. Fortunately, there are a number of great part-time jobs out there college students are ideally suited for. Here are six highly remunerative part-time jobs college students may be interested in.

1. Non-profit charity fundraiser

Charities are always looking for young people to help them out, especially in the fundraising department. This type of job often entails manning donation tables at various events, which means college students are going to be talking to a lot of people. They’ll need to be able to memorize facts about the charity and who it helps, be personable, and be able to smile and chat for hours. It’s not a job for introverts, but for those who are outgoing and want to gain experience working for nonprofits, it’s a great option. It also pays well—students can make up to $30/hour!

2. Social media assistant

Everyone is on some form of social media these days, but not everyone has mastered it. Some small business owners don’t even have time to really develop their social media because they’re so busy handling everything else, and they don’t have the money to hire someone full-time. However, many can budget money for a part-time social media assistant. If college students love Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms and don’t mind putting in the time to learn how to truly harness these sites for a business, then this is a great job for them. It can pay as much as $21/hour.

3. Academic tutor

If college students are peculiarly sharp in one particular subject area, they might want to offer their services as academic tutors to other students. Sometimes, these jobs are available through the university, but there’s nothing stopping them from doing private tutoring. Students will need to be sure they thoroughly understand the subject, and know how to explain it to others. They will be able to set their own rate and schedule, which is nice, but there’s no guarantee being a tutor will be steady work. Tutors make anything from $15 to $30 a tutoring session, but the rate and the length of each session has to be negotiated.

4. Freelance content writer

Many websites, blogs, and online publications are in need of content, and while some do have writers on staff, many look to freelance writers for new content. College students can find a number of these jobs online, and many don’t require much experience in writing, as long as they can show them a few well-written sample articles. Their pay will be negotiated on a case-by-case basis. Sometimes, students will be paid per word, while other clients may want to set a flat rate per article. On the upside, they’ll be able to work when they want and can do so from home.

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5. Office assistant

It may not sound glamorous, but being an office assistant is a good, steady job for college students. Students get to see first-hand how an office environment works, and the skills they develop can be useful in their own careers. Here are some of the tasks they may do as an office assistant:

• Answer the phones

• Do filing and organization

• Do light computer work

• Schedule appointments

• Assist employees with various tasks as needed

Students’ duties may vary depending on where they work, but those listed are fairly common. Through the job, they may learn about various computer problems, organizational methods, and more. During off-job hours, students can easily stay connected with their customers via cloud phone systems. If they get office assistant jobs at a business in their fields, they may even be able to turn their part-time gigs into full-time jobs when they graduate.

6. Guest services coordinator

A guest services coordinator assists customers with all of their needs. They may do returns, help customers find products, or do special orders in a retail setting. However, guest services can be found in many different industries. Some may actually do more office work, while others may work in support roles. No matter what industry students are working in, however, they’ll be dealing with customers, so this is another job in which being a people person is a must. It’s possible to make as much as $21 in one of these positions.

Want to learn more about different jobs, visit College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

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Sandra Lambert, guest writer

Sandra Lambert is a CISCO certified computer networking specialist. She has a keen interest in writing about her knowledge and experiences. She writes about technology as well as about business. She has also developed interest in public speaking. You can follow her on Google+ and Twitter.

Posted December 15, 2015 by

How to make more money with an English major doing freelance writing

Some people may be looking for alternatives to their regular nine-to-five jobs. One option could be freelance writing. Freelance writing not only offers flexibility but can be financially rewarding, depending on how much time and effort writers give it. In the following webinar, How to make more money with an English major doing freelance writing, English majors learn how to navigate the challenges of making money with an English major and the similarities and differences between freelance writing and writing as a full-time job. They will also get an expert’s opinion on building a freelance writing business right out of college and how to figure out if freelance writing is right for them. (more…)

Posted December 22, 2008 by

Advice for Freelance Writers

Like franchising, freelancing is a great way for college students and recent college graduates to earn money because they can set their own hours. In his aarticle for the December 2008 issue of Writer’s Digest, “Off the Clock,” Art Spikol gives freelance writers advice about how to charge for their services. In some instances, charging by the hour can be a bad idea, he says.
“An hourly rate always comes with the likelihood of somebody getting hurt,” Spikol says. “If you’re fast, you earn less than the slowpoke, which, of course, is absurd.” He goes on to say that experience alone will make a writer faster and more efficient, and that speed and efficiency should be rewarded, not penalized. By charging a flat fee for the entire job – research, writing, etc. – a writer can charge what he thinks h’es worth, then negotiate with the client from there.
“Flat fees work because business doesn’t like surprises,” says Spikol. “No matter what else you’re offering, your first priority is to make your clients feel safe.”
Spikol realizes, though, that sometimes a writer will be required to “provide an hourly rat or lose the project.” His advice? Provide it.
Spikol generally offers flat rates so clients know exactly how much the project will cost them. With an hourly rate, the amount the client owes can fluctuate, leaving the client with a feeling of uncertainty and stress. If a client chooses not to hire him, Spikol doesn’t take it personally. “There are lots of ways to lose a job,” he says.
If you’re a freelance writer who isn’t sure how to charge for projects, weighing the pros and cons of flat fees could be time well spent.