• Using social media to network in college

    June 24, 2016 by
    Social media photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    While college students may use social media for personal reasons, they can also use it for their careers. Social media allows students to find the right contacts and engage with them, which helps students build a professional network. This network can be an asset connecting college students to internships or entry-level job opportunities. Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, discusses building a network and how to use social media effectively to do so.

    “The best time to build your network is before you need it. College students need a strong network when searching for jobs or internships.

    It can be very difficult for college students to connect with established professionals because usually those requests are for “one-way relationships” from which ONLY the students stand to gain. That means there are no reasons or motivation for professionals to accept the requests.

    LinkedIn is, by far, the best professional research tool in social media. Students can use LinkedIn’s “Advanced Search” feature to identify top networking prospects in their fields.

    Unfortunately, LinkedIn is NOT a great engagement tool. Connection requests are easy to deny, and meaningful conversations are rarely on LinkedIn Groups. Twitter conversations, on the other hand, are much more natural and organic. That’s why a multi modal approach utilizing Twitter is so effective.

    After identifying prospects on LinkedIn, find and follow their Twitter accounts. Wait until they tweet about an area of mutual interest to respond with a tweet meant to catch their attention. The conversation doesn’t even need to be about a professional topic. A shared interest in sports, movies, etc., can be a great entree into a conversation!

    Responding to a targeted Tweet provides the opportunity to build a genuine two-way relationship. After engaging your target and building credibility, take it to the personal level and invite them to meet for coffee to introduce yourself and demonstrate your professionalism in person.”

    Need more networking advice? Come to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College & award-winning social media consultant

    Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College & award-winning social media consultant

    Chaim Shapiro, M.Ed. is the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant specializing in LinkedIn. He has presented his popular LinkedIn Workshop at National Conferences, Universities, Public Libraries and for communal organizations across the country. Chaim earned a Master’s Degree in College Student Personnel from Loyola University, Chicago, and also studied in the Institutional Leadership and Policy Studies Ph.D. program at the University of California, Riverside Graduate School of Education. He has more than 12 years of experience working in college administration.

  • What kind of degrees can be pursued online?

    May 21, 2016 by
    Learn photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    The availability of online colleges has increased drastically even just over the last 10 years, and with that change, the degree offerings have also become more widespread. Today, students can find almost any degree level or major offered through an online institution. With a little effort and commitment, they can find a career path that works for them and take them where they want to go. So, consider all of the possibilities offered today when it comes to online degrees.

    Certification levels

    Previously, the certification levels provided through online colleges were limited, but today, students can find degrees at any level to meet their needs. Here’s an overview of certifications and degrees available at most colleges and universities.

    •Certification: Many professional fields require ongoing certification to keep a license up-to-date. Fortunately, there are many certification program options, including those in medicine, education, counseling, and even business.

    •Associate Degree: Two-year associate degree programs are a good choice for many career options, and online institutions typically offer a wide variety of programs at this level.

    •Bachelor’s Degree: These four-year degrees are among the most popular online degree programs. Most online schools offer the widest variety of bachelor’s degree programs.

    •Master’s Degree: These options used to be much less common, but students can now find online programs to obtain an MBA, MS, M.Ed., or MA.

    •Doctoral Degree: This level of degree is still the rarest to be found on the internet; however, even doctorate degrees are increasingly offered online today. There are a variety of options ranging from business to education and even theology.

    Majors

    Many students believe they’ll be limited in their major choice if they choose to opt for an online program, but that simply isn’t the case. Online colleges offer a wide range of major options, including those in humanities, fine arts, business, finance, technology, science, health, medicine, education, and even law and criminal justice.

    Specialized degrees

    Today’s online colleges are even equipped to offer a wide range of specialized degree programs, such as a board certified behavior analyst program that can teach students to see the big picture. These degrees require specific preparation and advanced techniques that make them perfect candidates for an individualized online program. To pursue endorsement through a program like the behavior analyst certification, students are often required to complete specific prerequisites prior to applying for the program to ensure their success.

    There are more online degree options available today than ever before. Online colleges offer programs at all different certification levels, as well as degree programs in various subjects. The possibilities are unlimited.

    Are you thinking about going back to school? Find college majors with top entry-level jobs and go to our blog. Also, follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Rachelle Wilber, guest writer

    Rachelle Wilber, guest writer

    Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber; https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009221637700

  • 10 soft skills employers expect of recent graduates

    May 12, 2016 by
    Background concept wordcloud illustration of soft skills glowing light courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    Kheng Guan Toh/Shutterstock.com

    Are you ready to find your dream job as soon as you graduate? Then, it’s high time to draw a detailed plan with soft skills required for the workplace. This will help you stand out from other candidates and be a perfect fit for the position of your choice.

    To successfully accomplish the task, college graduates can analyze requirements for current vacancy announcements, make use of LinkedIn or Branded.me profiles of people with a great experience, and study analytical articles on the labor market to always stay updated.

    It’s not a secret, though, that plenty of online sources post about top soft skills potential employers want in their candidates’ CVs or resumes. So, why not focus on them to make your preparation for obtaining a good entry-level job a bit easier? Here’s what is highly demanded by most of the recruiters:

    1 – Lifelong learners

    Recent grads can hardly boast of knowing everything about the work they will perform daily. It’s quite natural when something is learned along the way. Sometimes employers prefer young, enthusiastic graduates over highly experienced professionals, since the former tend to learn and absorb new information more eagerly and are ready to develop a learning habit. The latter instead are quite often more stubborn and unlikely to reach a compromise, which can hinder team effectiveness. Additionally, lifelong learners are supposed to know how to obtain and process information to solve the problems they haven’t faced before.

    2 – Team players

    Teamwork is not only about collective responsibility for every team player’s actions. It’s also about communicating your message to others and achieving that goal with the help of knowledge and each employee’s efforts. Effective team performance depends much on the correct management and delegation of tasks. In contrast to past expectations for team players, modern employers are looking for those who will be proactive and suggest creative solutions. Initiative is strongly encouraged.

    3 – Effective time managers and schedulers

    Chaos brings no positive effect. To show high productivity and performance, it’s crucial to hone time management and prioritization skills. These two skills rank high on most employers’ lists of soft skills. For that, managers and schedulers need to negotiate deadlines and schedule tasks appropriately. Should tasks be equally urgent, they’d better discuss which one to take first together with their reporters. When using electronic or paper planners, think of short breaks that need to be made between tasks, divide time-consuming tasks into several subtasks, and leave about 10 or 15% of time for coping with emergencies and contingencies. Set reminders well in advance, and review to-do lists daily.

    4 – Good listeners and masters of convincing people

    Being a good listener doesn’t mean you should keep silent while somebody else is expressing his or her thoughts, so that you can further move on to your statements. The point is to really listen and hear other team players and choose the best solutions working together. Another important thing is to know how to make everyone understand what you mean. In other words, you should learn to use simple and concise statements, speaking with confidence to all people in the company regardless of their seniority.

    Problem solver words on business cards courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    iQoncept/Shutterstock.com

    5 – Problem solvers

    At the top of most top list of soft skills is “problem solving skills.” The first step to successful problem solving is to clearly understand what the problem is and what caused it. The next step is to carefully consider interests of others and list all suitable solutions. The final step is to evaluate suggested options by listing their advantages and disadvantages, and then choose the one that has the most pluses. To be an efficient problem solver, you need to get rid of fear. By focusing more on tackling the problem, you will be able to do it with ease.

    6 – Company fan

    Being a company fan means to be knowledgeable about your employer’s industry. Understanding what key benefits the company gives to its customers or clients, how the process of decision-making is organized, what main competitors the company has, etc. are among the things job seekers should learn before a job interview.

    7 – Data analyzer

    If you work with people with analytical mindsets, you are a lucky person. This allows you to quickly gather, assess, and analyze new information, selecting only the things you will need at work. This soft skill is highly required for making future plans or prognoses, and creating recommendations for others to follow. This skill is also helpful when you need to analyze your successes or failures, which is very important for your progress.

    8 – Tech-savvy person

    This means not only knowing how to create, delete, or remove presentations or surf the Internet proficiently. Being tech-savvy means knowing what tools and programs are used by the specialist you want to become. For example, if you want to become a web designer, you will need to master such programs as Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, or Indesign.

    9 – Critical thinker

    If you have a chance to join a series of workshops on how to become a good critical thinker, jump at the chance! These practical lessons will teach you how to criticize somebody else wisely by finding a strong argument and how to accept criticism of your work. Being a critical thinker is essential for improving your communication skills and professional growth too. Critical thinking ranks high on the list of soft skills regardless of your job title or position.

    10 – Curious mind

    Being curious means to never be afraid of asking questions. Though, it doesn’t mean you should behave like a chattering box, annoying other employees with your never-ending questions. You should ask questions when you don’t know the answers so your work won’t be done slowly. You must use proper discernment to ask questions of the right person (your manager or mentors) at the right time (one on one and in quiet settings, and preferably not during the last five minutes of meetings).

    A few final tips

    Taking an active part in extra-curricular activities and voluntary projects can also help job seekers develop a set of useful skills for their future jobs. By establishing friendly relationships with people, you increase your chances of getting what you need. Who knows, maybe some of your peers or instructors will recommend you as a highly promising hire one day.

    Need more help with your job search? Head over to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Nancy Lin, guest writer

    Nancy Lin, guest writer

    Nancy Lin is a student of Rockhurst University and enthusiastic freelance writer who enthuses about rock music, writing, and classic English literature. Feel free to contact her at Twitter or Google+.

  • 3 employment options for recent grads

    April 30, 2016 by
    Graduation male student with different careers to choose courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    Tom Wang/Shutterstock.com

    Considering the economy and technology are on the upswing, many recent grads start their careers while studying at college. And we are not talking about part-time at the campus café; college students often have jobs that bring them valuable professional experience, and ensure a tangible level of income. So when graduation day comes, college students are not a bunch of scared rookies but professionals with decent backgrounds in their fields. Nevertheless, there is still a question: what form of employment is worth the effort? Startups and freelancing look more attractive, yet they conceal many tricky pitfalls. As for good old full-time employment, it needs serious reshaping and improvement to attract young professionals. There are at least three employment options for recent grads, but which option is best?

    It is all in the mindset

    According to recent surveys, three out of five students expect they will be able to work remotely, and less than a half of 18-29 year olds employed are working full-time. It is not a crisis or an unexpected epidemic given that youth follow the elder generations; Gen Z (this is how sociologists and HR experts categorize people born in the mid to late 1990s through the 2010s) had a Millennials rise as a model to follow. The same surveys indicate about 30% of Gen Y started businesses while in college, and about 91% are considering changing their current jobs within three years. With this in mind, we can tell the younger generation has been raised in the spirit of freedom and solopreneurship, now demanding a different approach from HR departments and recruiters. Yet, the last say goes to employees, and here are things they should consider before accepting job offers and jump into their careers or solo businesses. Let’s take a look at each of the following three employment options for recent grads to consider.

    Start a company

    Starting your own company is rather challenging, though many examples have proven it to be successful. The idea is to push your passion into profit and convince others that your business is worth all the efforts.

    Startup advantages:

    – Working for yourself
    – Creating great financial opportunities
    – Implementing your own ideas
    – Great life experience

    Startup disadvantages:

    – Tough competition
    – Investments needed
    – Lack of “job security”
    – Startup is riskier and more costly

    Understand that starting your own business calls for an award-winning concept necessary to enter the entrepreneurial world. Those who choose to make such a living should be patient, as niche startups are likely to bear fruit no sooner than 12 months after launch.

    Freelancing

    Freelancing is actually quite similar to starting your own business. On the one hand, it comes rather risky though you do not have to invest. On the other hand, you are free to follow your commitments with passion and drive.

    Freelancing advantages:

    – Benefit from flexible hours (Sleep until noon, if you like. No one will ever bother you unless the project deadline is approaching)
    – Take control of your customers and tasks (Choose whom you are going to work with and opt for the most appealing tasks)
    – Keep all the profits (You are the boss. You don’t have to split the profit or pay salaries, yet be aware of taxation and other expenses)
    – Stay wherever you want (Freelancing is perfect for a travelling enthusiast)

    Freelancing disadvantages:

    – Lack of steady workloads (At some point, you can suffer from the lack of orders unless you’ve managed to create a solid customer base)
    – Insecurity (There are numerous occasions when freelancers are not paid or become victims of fraud)
    – You pay for yourself (No social package or any other benefits provided by the employer. You’re the boss, remember?)

    Full-time job

    The most influential thing about a full-time job is a contract and guaranteed salary in addition to employer’s benefits, a workplace provided, and more. However, the current economic situation will hardly provide you with total job and financial security, while being hopeless in enabling your professional development.

    Full-time advantages:

    – Steady salary (Your monthly payment is guaranteed)
    – Governmental and social securities (Your contact is protected by social and economic policies)
    – Constant workload (You will never witness a lack of tasks and duties)

    Full-time disadvantages:

    – Heavy workload (Too much work is not good for you. It results in stress and health problems in addition to a lack of personal time)
    – Lack of professional development (You can stick to a routine without the slightest chance to develop your skills)
    – Not enough salary (You will hardly find employees who are satisfied with their monthly salaries. Always keep in mind that every employer is eager to cut down on expenses. Salary is a key point in the list of expenses)

    Each working arrangement comes with pros and cons. The best way to make up your mind is to consider every point we have discussed. No matter what you choose, get pleasure from what you are doing and never hesitate to make a crucial step and change your life for the better.

    Need more advice regarding employment options? Search for jobs with College Recruiter and check out our blog. Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Justine Thomas, guest writer

    Justine Thomas, guest writer

    Justine Thomas is a blogger and freelance writer. Her main interests are foreign languages, psychology, and fitness. Currently, she is working at educational company, Edubirdie.com, as a consulting editor.

  • Financial aid secrets for college students

    April 23, 2016 by
    Financial aid web browser sign concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    alexmillos/Shutterstock.com

    With graduation season looming, high school seniors throughout the country are receiving their college acceptance letters and celebrating their impending sense of freedom. At the same time, parents are studying financial aid options and scratching their heads trying to figure out how to pay for the upcoming four (or more) years.

    As the costs of attending college rise, it’s important to consider scholarships, grants, and student loans to assist with the hefty fees. There are also some innovative tricks that can help reduce this cost. Here are some insights gleaned from real university financial aid employees, parents, and former college students all high school seniors and their families should know.

    Use your FAFSA

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is an important financial aid document college students shouldn’t skip. Even if they don’t think they’ll qualify for any money, it’s important to fill this form out annually. This is how the federal government and schools determine what type of aid to give students. There are many subtle things that can impact the grants offered, many of which are unknown to the average person, and may change the amount a family qualifies for.

    Attend class

    Many universities have strict attendance and truancy policies to prevent abuse of the grants offered. If a student withdraws from a class due to non-attendance in the first few classes or consistent unexplained absences, their course load may drop below the mandatory credits needed to qualify for certain grants. If you have a scholarship or grant already, make sure you know the terms and what’s expected from your end.

    Become a Resident Advisor (RA)

    Aside from tuition, room and board are the most expensive costs incurred during college. With the average college student paying $8,535 a year just for a place to stay, it makes sense to try to skimp on this fee. Students who work as a Resident Advisor often wind up with free or significantly reduced room and board in exchange for their services, making this one of the most lucrative student jobs available.

    Learn to cook

    While Top Ramen may be students best friend those first few months, anything prepared at home is bound to be more affordable than college meal plans and eating out at restaurants. Even if a student’s cooking skills need some brushing up, this is one of the easiest ways to save money. Don’t be afraid of the kitchen.

    Find freebies

    So much of an average college student’s budget is spent on personal expenses, which often includes entertainment. Seek free options available through the university instead. Campuses are loaded with free amenities, from swimming pools and libraries to dorm dinners, guest lecture speakers, and student clubs.

    Join a credit union

    Since credit unions are run as cooperatives, they can afford giving customers extra perks that wind up saving them a lot of money. They typically feature lower credit card interest rates, higher interest rates paid out on savings accounts, and reduced-fee ATMs and online banking services.

    While the term “starving student” has origins in truth, it doesn’t need to be a reality for all. Instead, research financial aid opportunities and spend wisely to save money and stick to a good budget throughout your academic career.

    If you’re interested in more information on financial aid, please visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

    Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

    Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

    Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information on first time budgeting, see what a Bountiful Utah Credit Union might recommend. Brooke is available via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

  • How to avoid 5 common study slip-ups

    April 02, 2016 by
    Female college student studying in a library courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    michaeljung/Shutterstock.com

    Highly effective students know how to study. They pace themselves and don’t save all of their studying for the last minute. They also know how to take notes along the way to make their studying more efficient. Cramming and other last-minute study techniques can leave them exhausted, and incapable of performing well on test day. Use these ideas to improve your study system, and get a better grade this time around.

    1. Avoid cramming

    If you absolutely have to cram before a test, try to take breaks. Sleep is important for learning, so find a few hours to sleep after a long study session, and you’ll be better able to think clearly during the test. Research shows the first sleep cycle lasts about three hours. After that, we dip in and out every one and a half hours. Try to sleep from three to four and a half hours before your test.

    2. Create a habit

    Studying at the same time every day allows students to study better for their tests and make time for important assignments. Pick a time when you are unlikely to be disturbed and aim for the same time each day. You’ll get a better study session, and your brain will start to become used to your study routine.

    3. Study locations

    The place where students study is important. If they find they study best in the library, they should make a habit of getting out of their dorms or apartments, and getting to the library first thing. Make home a safe place from school work, and find places outside of it to work hard and for preparation. This way, home can become a place to relax, unwind, and have some fun.

    4. Set specific goals

    If you’re working toward a master’s in higher education, your goals should be specific and relate not only to your coursework, but your future career. Create lesson plans to start building the skills to become a teacher. Conduct mock lectures when teaching the material you’re learning in school to an imaginary classroom. This will not only show what you haven’t learned, but will prepare you to become a more effective educator. The same goes if you plan to intern as a scientist in the lab or research assistant. Come up with appropriate scenarios and hands-on study that prepare you for your future career and still help you learn the material.

    5. Don’t procrastinate

    Treat studying like a job. The most important thing to remember is students don’t have to be in the mood for studying. Studying is a process, and they may have some good days and some bad days. It’s okay to have a bad study session. Don’t let your mood affect whether you’re going to study. Push through and make your habits stick, and the rest is easy.

    If you’re going for a long study session, start with the most difficult subjects first. Move on to the easier subjects when fatigue becomes a factor. Remember to take frequent breaks, and eat foods high in protein and carbs to sustain your energy levels and to prevent dips in energy.

    If you’re looking for more study tips, go to the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

    Photo of Brooke Chaplan

    Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

    Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

  • 8 Ways to Earn Cash While in School

    May 08, 2014 by
    Young college student tutoring an older classmate

    Young college student tutoring an older classmate. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    College students truly understand the definition of broke. Although some students attend school on a part-time basis and work to support themselves, the majority of students attend school full-time and seek part-time opportunities to generate extra cash.

    Even if financial aid pays for your tuition and your parents give you money each month, these funds might not be enough. This is especially true if you have a car, bills and other expenses you need to cover. But given your school schedule, you may not have a lot of time for work.

    Fortunately, several opportunities are available to you. Here are eight ways to make money as a college student that won’t take a lot of your time, or too much of your energy. Continue Reading

  • Seven great jobs to work while you’re in college

    October 15, 2013 by
    College tutor with student

    College tutor with student. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    When it comes to good jobs, college students are sometimes stuck in the middle.

    While they’re not quite qualified for many career jobs that require a degree, students are typically smart enough to snag a number of other excellent positions. But given busy school schedules, the jobs must be flexible and part-time. That limits options. Thankfully, there are a number of great part-time, flexible gigs out there. Continue Reading

  • Things to Consider Before Becoming a Full-Time Freelance Writer

    January 05, 2009 by

    Deciding to write freelance on a full time basis is a big decision. There’s more to it than simply waking up one day and saying “I think I’ll be a freelance writer full time,” and then doing it. And if you have a family, the decision is even tougher.
    In her article for the December 2008 issue of The Writer magazine, C. Hope Clark, herself a full-time freelance writer, gives aspiring full-time freelancers some things to think about before they “take the plunge.”
    The first question Clark recommends writers ask themselves is if their day jobs are really so bad.
    Other questions to ask yourself:

    • Why do I want to leave my current job?
    • Do I crave the freelance life because I want to write or because I want to get away from my boss and[/or] coworkers?

    Next, Clark advises making two lists – one that details what makes the daily 9-to-5 so bad and one that details what makes it good.
    Some things to consider:

    • Will I miss the positives of my day job?
    • Will I get rid of all the things I hate?
    • What will I lose by becoming a freelancer? (like health benefits)

    People who have families should definitely find out what their families think. That’s not the same as asking for their permission or soliciting support, Clark says. It just means that their feelings and thoughts are important and will be considered before a final decision is made.
    Clark asked her family’s opinion and as a result, they relocated so her husband could accept a promotion and reduce the strain on the family budget. Not everyone can be so fortunate, so it’s a good idea to calculate the money that will be lost by leaving your day job in order to be a full-time freelance writer. Also, be sure to save at least “six months of expenses” before taking that first fateful step. Success rarely, if ever, happens right away and bills will still have to be paid.
    Freelance writing is a business like any other. Clients and editors need to be responded to in a timely manner, accounts need to be organized and accurate, and deadlines have to be met.
    There are many other things that Clark says a freelance writer has to think about, like training to stay up-to-date with industry changes, start-up expenses, and “what small-business licenses and fees may be required in your town, county and state.” Being uninformed could be costly. Finally, she suggests writing a business plan.
    Becoming a full-time freelance writer is more than a notion. Clark recommends visiting the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Web site (www.sba.gov) to connect with a mentor and join professional organizations.

  • Advice for Freelance Writers

    December 22, 2008 by

    Like franchising, freelancing is a great way for college students and recent college graduates to earn money because they can set their own hours. In his aarticle for the December 2008 issue of Writer’s Digest, “Off the Clock,” Art Spikol gives freelance writers advice about how to charge for their services. In some instances, charging by the hour can be a bad idea, he says.
    “An hourly rate always comes with the likelihood of somebody getting hurt,” Spikol says. “If you’re fast, you earn less than the slowpoke, which, of course, is absurd.” He goes on to say that experience alone will make a writer faster and more efficient, and that speed and efficiency should be rewarded, not penalized. By charging a flat fee for the entire job – research, writing, etc. – a writer can charge what he thinks h’es worth, then negotiate with the client from there.
    “Flat fees work because business doesn’t like surprises,” says Spikol. “No matter what else you’re offering, your first priority is to make your clients feel safe.”
    Spikol realizes, though, that sometimes a writer will be required to “provide an hourly rat or lose the project.” His advice? Provide it.
    Spikol generally offers flat rates so clients know exactly how much the project will cost them. With an hourly rate, the amount the client owes can fluctuate, leaving the client with a feeling of uncertainty and stress. If a client chooses not to hire him, Spikol doesn’t take it personally. “There are lots of ways to lose a job,” he says.
    If you’re a freelance writer who isn’t sure how to charge for projects, weighing the pros and cons of flat fees could be time well spent.