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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 14, 2016 by

Fraudulent job postings target college students

Fraudulent job postings, left unchecked, can prove truly harmful to college students and recent grads. Recently, an organization calling itself HYDROCK, Inc, LLC, posted fraudulent job postings for college students. Thankfully, the Better Business Bureau of Minnesota and North Dakota received reports about the fraudulent postings and alerted employers, job seekers, and recruitment media companies like College Recruiter about the questionable job postings.

The postings boasted of positions allowing students flexible hours/scheduling “to avoid conflicts between classes or other business.” Unfortunately, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Upon further investigation, that was the case with this posting.

College students and recent grads should be leery of shady job postings. If applicants run across job postings like this (or are approached by companies after posting their resumes online), they should consider the following warning signs that may indicate signs of fraudulence:

  • You will receive a check up front, prior to beginning work.
  • You will work a minimal number of hours but receive a large income in return.
  • You are asked to submit your Social Security number or very sensitive personal information to a company prior to the face-to-face interview and acceptance of the position.
  • As part of the position, you will be required to transfer money or reship goods.
  • The company claims to be located in another country.
  • The position does not list any minimum qualifications for education or experience.
  • The job posting contains grammatical, mechanical, or stylistic errors.
  • The company claims to have been in business for years, but the website was only recently created.

Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter, recently discussed the topic of fraudulent job postings with Pete Weddle, the Vice President of TATech. Faith will be moderating a panel discussion at the TATech Industry Congress this weekend, April 16-17, in Orlando, Florida.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Faith and Pete both believe that if College Recruiter and other recruitment media companies take action to prevent scammers from successfully reaching candidates, they will help make a difference in fighting this ongoing battle against fraudulent job postings.

“At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves to get started in a great career. Having quality job postings is necessary to reaching this goal,” Faith Rothberg states. “We also believe that talent acquisition leaders deserve to have a place to connect with candidates, a place which showcases quality positions they have to offer. This is what College Recruiter offers. College Recruiter’s extensive filtering system ensures that the jobs on our site are quality postings and are limited strictly to those with 0-3 years of experience.”

Need help managing job postings? Reach out to College Recruiter—we’re here to help.

Posted March 22, 2016 by

How to use social media to engage with employers

How can college students and recent graduates use social media to engage online with potential employers (recruiters and talent acquisition professionals) during the job search process?

In this 5-minute video, Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter, provides tips and information for students and grads about how to maximize connections with employers while searching for jobs and networking online.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

A study by Aberdeen found that 73% of 18-34 year-olds found their last job through social networking. Social media is truly valuable, not just for use in your personal life, but for professional use as well. 94% of employers admit to searching for candidates on social media before inviting them in for a face-to-face interview.

Clearly social media matters.

According to a Career Crossroads study, you’re 10 times more likely to land a job if your job application is accompanied by an employee referral.

Knowing the right people matters. But how can you obtain an employee referral if you don’t already personally know someone working within the company? By connecting with employers via social media!

First, do an advanced search on LinkedIn to identify employees within the company, particularly those who live in your preferred region, and invite them to connect with you on LinkedIn.

Next, visit the company’s website to see which social media sites the company hosts. Follow the company online, not just to check for job postings, but also to engage with recruiters and hiring managers who post LinkedIn discussions and host Twitter chats.

One way to brand yourself to potential employers on social media is to comment on social media discussions in a thoughtful, meaningful manner. Do not engage in discussions hosted by employers in a hostile, rude manner, even if you feel passionate about the topic; remember to keep online conversation polite and courteous at all times. This isn’t Reddit or your personal text thread.

Do make it a point to share your expertise in subject matter when applicable. This brands you as a subject matter expert. While it’s great to compliment people, or make bland comments like, “Love it!” or “I agree,” these comments are never memorable.

Comments that provoke further, deeper discussion are memorable. Comments with embedded links to other great content are memorable. Insightful, appropriate comments demonstrating experience and expertise are memorable.

If you never comment and simply read threads, you will not be remembered; you must participate in order to stand out from the hundreds (or thousands) of job applicants vying for positions.

To learn more about how to use social media to your advantage in your job search, follow our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.