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Posted March 28, 2016 by

11 quick LinkedIn tips

Linkedin website on a computer screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Ingvar Bjork/Shutterstock.com

Did you know 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to look for candidates? This means companies can find job seekers’ profiles and invite them for job interviews. For this to happen, though, job seekers need to make their profiles look appropriate. Adding their pictures and job titles is not enough anymore, as their LinkedIn profiles can be more important than their resumes. If job seekers want recruiters to visit their pages often and offer them great positions, here are some things they should consider.

1. Recommendations

Employers tend to pay a lot of attention not only to job seekers’ professional skills, but also to their corporate backgrounds. If applicants have proven to be excellent team workers at their previous jobs, they should seek recommendations from former bosses or colleagues. Ask some of them to write a couple of nice recommendations. Don’t exaggerate here, though. If applicants have had five jobs so far but have 15 recommendations, it might seem weird.

2. Write a longer headline

If you already have a job, but are open to new offerings, don’t just mention the company and your position there; it might be not enough to see what you do. Instead of writing, for example, “PR Manager at Example Company,” write “PR manager at Example Company: Helping big and small companies.”

3. Have enough connections

Having 50 connections on LinkedIn makes job seekers seem unfriendly, unprofessional, and unmotivated. Having 3000 contacts makes them look like they add everyone to their list of connections, and they don’t even care who’s there. Try to have a moderate number of connections, and you will be visible enough to make the network help your professional growth. Try to find all of your friends, former classmates, and colleagues if you’ve already worked somewhere.

4. Write only true information

We don’t want to lecture job seekers, but lying is unacceptable in the professional world. It concerns their LinkedIn profiles, too, particularly education and previous jobs. It is not only that recruiters can check everything, but it is also about ethics. Earning trust is an important step to professional success.

5. Be brief

No one likes to read lots of text, especially if it is not formatted correctly. Even if job seekers had tons of experience and they want to talk about it, they should organize it. Write a job title and describe your responsibilities point by point. Use headlines and short sentences; they are easier to comprehend.

6. Students can mention all the jobs they’ve had

Surely, when you are a big boss with 10 jobs behind, you can skip some of the gigs you’ve had such as pizza delivery or tutoring in college. However, college students or recent graduates might want to add at least some things to their work experience. Besides, most students do something during their college years. If they managed to study and freelance at the same time, they should mentions that. If students helped their professors grade papers, they can write about that too. Don’t leave a page blank; add at least something.

7. Choose the right picture for your profile

Don’t pick an Instagram-style photo or a cute picture with your pets; post casual photos on Facebook or elsewhere. Low-quality pictures are also not the best choice. Think of how you want potential employers to see you. The photo should be a recent, high-quality photograph where one can clearly see your face. You can also add a background picture; the best choice would be either a picture from some conference you participated in or some nature pic.

8. Write about your main skills, not all of them

We all know you are a talented person. However, if you are trying for an accountant job, recruiters probably don’t need to know you are a good cook. At the top of your LinkedIn page, your potential employer or recruiters need to see those skills suitable for them. Also, don’t mention the skills you don’t want to use in your next job. If you are tired of your current work where you need to design, for example, exclude this skill from your profile.

9. Add a decent email address

If your personal email address is dirtykitten@email.com or something like that, you probably want to get a new one. You must have had a laugh creating it, but now it is time to be more professional and to use your own name for your email address.

10. Don’t mention your age

Although all the companies say age discrimination doesn’t exist, that is not true. They always consider age when hiring. So, try not to mention it.

11. Make sure all is correct

Making mistakes in a LinkedIn profile is a no-no. Pay attention not only to grammar and spelling, but to style and formatting. Everything should be clear and understandable. Style should be formal and professional.

Try to look at your text as an objective reader, or better yet, show it to someone. Ask a friend, colleague, or professor to read it and correct the mistakes you might have missed.

A LinkedIn profile is much more important now than it was a couple of years ago. More and more professionals, companies, and headhunters create accounts and use them actively every day. Job seekers probably want to look equally experienced and professional on their pages, so spend enough time creating them and don’t be lazy.

Looking for more LinkedIn tips for your job search? Turn to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of William Sarto

William Sarto, guest writer

William Sarto is a marketer and content strategist working at the freelance writing board – gohunters.com. He shares his knowledge and experience in his articles based on current marketing trends and also provides actionable tips for students willing to build successful business careers. He is passionate about all new techniques and methods appearing in digital marketing. Working in one of the most fast changing industries requires many skills from young specialists, so if you have any questions feel free to contact Will @ twitter, Google+

Posted December 18, 2015 by

How to eliminate stress at work

akansha arora

Akansha Arora

During the week, a lot of time is spent at work, and it is important that people have a stress-free environment there. Stress exists commonly at every workplace, and being efficient at your job can help you deal with it. But what about the environment; would you like to sit eight hours a day at a place where you cannot even smile at your neighbor? Of course not! Maintaining good relationships with colleagues creates a stress free environment and enhances your productivity. Here is how you can build good relationships with your coworkers. (more…)

Posted February 16, 2015 by

Want a Job after Graduation? 5 College Courses You Shouldn’t Miss

Cindy Bates photo

Cindy Bates

Despite the fact that we all have our particular degree requirements during our respective times at college, it is always helpful to be anticipating skills that are marketable in the workforce. Aside from offering the chance to take sunrise yoga as an activity course, this stipulation in the design of college degree programs exists to also allow students to vary their interests and their skill set in order to be more desirable as a new piece of meat in the job market. Yet, there are those college courses that everyone should take—not only to make oneself more attractive to a possible employer, but also to gain life skills that are essential to functioning in life: (more…)

Posted July 09, 2014 by

Recent College Graduates, Involved in Negotiation When it Comes to Jobs? Avoid These 7 Mistakes

Before accepting new jobs, recent college graduates may have the opportunity to negotiate for something.  When negotiating, they (and other job seekers) should avoid these seven mistakes discussed in the following post.

While even the word “negotiation” can evoke fear, stress and anxiety for many, the intent is quite simple: to discuss and ultimately agree on a deal.  Whether it’s a multimillion dollar contract or just deciding where to meet for lunch, life is rife with negotiations.  And, the negotiation process is

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Posted July 02, 2013 by

How Are Business Ethics in the United States?

In a perfect world, there would be no such thing as unethical behavior in the workplace.  However, we don’t live in such a place, and there is the temptation for people to do wrong.  The following infographic examines the state of business ethics in the United States, which includes how companies can improve conduct at the office. (more…)

Posted October 01, 2006 by

Surviving the Fake Resume

How can you recognize the phoney resume? Excellent question. There was a recent debate about the practice of recruiters’ posting fake resumes on job boards in order to assertedly test the waters and evaluate the interests of hiring managers. The recruiter also seemed to admit that this was actually a technique for getting job requisitions. There was an argument that this is an honest practice and carries absolutely no taint because of the research value, potential for building connections, and a “take it or leave it” opportunity.

Many recruiters who saw the admission decried the practice citing the fact that these ruses are a major waste of time. The time to cull a database, read and evaluate, and then do outreach is time that could have been spent on a real person who is legitimately looking for employment and is willing to entertain a potential situation. Even more vexing was the realization that the discussion was drummed up in order to draw attention to an article that was published the next day, to make innuendoes about a start-up business, and to promote the formation of a new discussion group. But those are somewhat tangential issues. Drawing all three together, however, is honesty about what is presented. That was what stirred up the most controversy — honesty, credibility, ethics, trustworthiness, and respect — respect of and value of one’s time.

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