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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted September 21, 2016 by

Are you wasting millions on your on-campus recruiting approach? It’s possible.

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

This headline from October 2015 in Harvard Business Review says it all: “Firms are wasting millions recruiting on only a few college campuses.”

We’ve seen this for years, especially among the EPS companies across investment banks, management consulting firms, and law firms. There are “target” campuses and then there’s “everyone else.” While you might get some amazingly high-quality people (good!), overall the process has a lot of waste, financially and in terms of potential burnout for your recruiting team.

There’s a better way. Ever seen the stat that it took 35 years to construct the federal highway system, but Facebook reached 500 million users in six years? It’s an obvious stat, sure — but it speaks to the amazing power of digital to both connect and scale.

No matter how you approach digital vs. in-person, your goal should be to maximize your ROI from your college recruiting efforts. To do that, you might need to move around some budget buckets: less on-campus and more interactive/digital/social/job board work.

 

Posted September 20, 2016 by

What’s the difference between diversity and inclusion?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

Diversity is a complicated topic, especially in this modern political climate where it seems like many are trying to define other groups as the enemy. It’s also semantically complicated — it means many different things to many different people. Some think of it as skin color, some as gender, some along socioeconomic lines. It varies.

What’s more — diversity and inclusion are actually very different concepts, although they’re not often treated as such. Your efforts at diverse recruiting need to differentiate between the two ideas. (more…)

Posted September 19, 2016 by

Did you know Goldman Sachs just down-shifted their on-campus recruiting?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

Goldman Sachs has long been considered a king of on-campus recruiting.

Don’t get us wrong: they still do it, and they’re still aggressive around a few campuses. But recently they’ve shifted budget over to interactive, digital, social, and job boards more so — all in the interest of maximizing their college recruiting ROI. (more…)

Posted September 18, 2016 by

It’s time to think more about diversity recruiting

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

We tend to think of diversity in very specific ways, using even more specific terms…but there’s oftentimes layers and layers of nuance we’re missing. Have you ever considered narcissism in hiring, for example? Cue this study:

“A job interview is one of the few social situations where narcissistic behaviors such as boasting actually create a positive impression,” said Del Paulhus, Psychology Professor at the University of British Columbia and the study’s lead author. “Normally, people are put off by such behavior, especially over repeated exposure.” The research noted that “narcissists tended to talk about themselves, make eye contact, joke around and ask the interviewers more questions. As a result, the study found that people rated narcissists as more attractive candidates for the position.”

That’s not good. You need to be thinking more and more about your diversity recruiting efforts, on a variety of spectrums.

One of the most effective operational ways to do that is by diversifying your recruitment funnel. You do that through shifting methods — move away from on-campus and more to online, for example. There’s a concern that online candidates aren’t as “vetted” as face-to-face candidates, but that can be overcome.

 

Posted September 17, 2016 by

You need effective talent, but can’t pay huge bucks for it. What now?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

As a smaller business, what you need is effective talent. That, coupled with strong decision-making and the right technological assets, will help you get competitive with your bigger in-industry rivals.

If you lack the talent, though, everything that comes next usually isn’t that successful. The problem, of course, is that traditional methods of getting talent — especially young talent, which (truth be told) can be gotten cheaper and developed — cost money. Doing on-campus college recruiting involves asset production, plane fares, hotel rooms, and other costs.

As a result, many companies — SMBs to enterprises like Goldman Sachs and Lockheed Martin — are shifting resources away from on-campus recruiting and into virtual/interactive recruiting. (more…)

Posted September 16, 2016 by

How do you actually hit your diversity recruiting targets?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

We all know diversity needs to be a priority in recruiting, but many of us struggle with this daily.

There are best practices all over the Internet for diversity recruiting — Harvard has a particularly good one — and there are numerous lists of good companies for diversity, including Black Enterprise’s version and Fortune’s version.

There are organizations out there doing diversity recruiting properly, and here’s the central thing all of them have in common: they diversify (logically) their pipelines. If you’re predominantly on-campus, then you’re predominantly going to get the types of students on that campus. But if you’re on-campus and using digital tools and job boards, you can attract a wider grouping. Then, from a numbers perspective and a talent perspective, you’re set up for more success. (more…)

Posted September 15, 2016 by

How focused on talent strategy are you, really?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing writer to College Recruiter

A year ago at the Reinventing America Summit, one session was on “Winning The Big Talent Game.” (The sub-title of the corresponding Forbes article was “It’s not about snacks and scooters.”)

Kip Wright, SVP of Manpower North America, had a sobering thought at this event: “Do you, every month, look at your financial plan? Of course,” he said. “How many of you spend months looking at your talent plan? We’ve got to fundamentally think very selfishly and aggressively about how we manage our talent.”

We do. And if you’re a smaller company, this is even more relevant — because your resources may be limited compared to some of your enterprise competitors. If you have better people, you’ll win those key market share/partner battles — but there’s a belief that you need to break the bank to get better people. You don’t. (more…)

Posted September 14, 2016 by

Maximizing your diversity recruiting

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing writer to College Recruiter

There are organizations out there doing diversity recruiting properly, and here’s the central thing all of them have in common: they diversify (logically) their pipelines.

If you’re predominantly on-campus, then you’re predominantly going to get the types of students on that campus. But if you’re on-campus and using digital tools and job boards, you can attract a wider grouping. Then, from a numbers perspective and a talent perspective, you’re set up for more success. (more…)

Posted August 26, 2016 by

Biggest networking mistake you can make

Asking photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

For many college students and recent graduates, networking is likely to be part of their job searches. Their success or failure when interacting with recruiters and hiring managers will depend on their approach. While securing internships or entry-level jobs is a priority, college students and recent grads don’t want to come off as too aggressive when asking about career opportunities. Job seekers should not assume that just because they are eager to work that employers will automatically tell them about job opportunities, including those in the hidden job market.

When networking, students and graduates can inform professionals about who they are and what interests they have. At the same time, they can ask questions to learn more about potential employers and what they have to offer. Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business, discusses a key mistake to avoid when networking and shares helpful tips for a better experience.

“The biggest networking mistake is asking people if they know of any open jobs. It’s good to be aggressive and show you’re looking for work. But why should anyone recommend you, especially if they don’t know you or your work ethic?

The best way to network is showing curiosity about what people do. Ask them and tell them you’d like to learn more about their profession; establish an interest in them. They may recommend you and say “This person is interested in…and may be good for the position.” Asking employers if they’re hiring won’t be as effective as “Hey, what do you do?” Avoid that mistake and you’ll be better at networking.”

Want to improve your networking skills? Visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business

Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business

Marc Prosser is the Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business, a site that provides reviews and articles for small business owners. Prior to starting Fit Small Business, Marc was the CMO of FXCM for 10 years. He joined as FXCM’s first employee and grew the company to more than 700 employees.

Posted August 01, 2016 by

4 winning resume tips for recent graduates

Businessman passing document to businesswoman photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

You don’t like getting spam, do you? Well, neither do hiring managers. It may be quick and efficient to upload your resume on popular job sites and send employers the same robo-resume, but hiring managers view these generic, mass mailings as spam. They can spot one-size-fits-all resumes in a nano-second and quickly discard them.

Here are four tips from hiring managers featured in the book, Graduate to a Great Career, on how to create a winning resume:

1. Add a short profile statement and your key selling points at the top “above the fold”

Realize your resume is an ad for branding yourself. Like a newspaper, an ad, or web page, the most important “real estate” is in the top half of your resume. Branding resumes begin with a profile or qualifications statement, a couple of crisp sentences that define your value. A strong profile statement is critical for recent graduates. You don’t have an impressive job title and career history yet, so you’ll need to specify your career focus and value proposition in your profile statement. In fact, many hiring managers told me a big problem with new graduate resumes is it can be hard to determine what entry-level job the new grad is looking for, especially if the grad doesn’t have a career-specific major like accounting or computer science. A profile headline like “Seeking an entry-level positioning” is too generic and doesn’t convey your career path. Remember, it’s your job to convey your career identity, not the hiring manager’s. For example, a recent grad named Erin who was a psychology major pursuing a career in marketing began her profile with the headline, “Aspiring marketing assistant: Psychology grad with pulse on the consumer mindset,” followed by a few bullets outlining her focus, strengths, and marketing credentials through two internships.

2. Expand your skill set to take advantage of new market opportunities

Be willing to take advantage of where the momentum is in the marketplace. During her job search for marketing jobs, Erin, our aspiring marketer mentioned above, noticed big retailers were advertising entry-level jobs and internships in merchandising, an area related to marketing that involves selecting products and evaluating sales performance. She decided to expand her job search and pursue both career paths: merchandising and marketing. Because there were a lot of merchandising internships online, she snagged a three-month, part-time internship at a large global retailer. But Erin needed a different elevator pitch and resume to apply for full-time merchandising jobs, and now with her internship, she had a story to tell. She had a hands-on role in compiling trend and competitive analysis reports, which gave her specific marketable skills. Here is Erin’s new profile statement for her merchandising resume, “Merchandising assistant with strong analytic, merchandising, and marketing skills.” She included new skills such as “completed Excel reports for accurate demand forecasting that resulted in a 10% improvement in accurate buying.” Before long, Erin was offered a merchandising job at a top global retailer.

3. Play to keywords and how the resume robots screen resumes.

The first “person” your resume has to impress is not likely to be a human being but a computer. Due to the volume of resumes that large and medium-sized companies receive, most companies use ATS (applicant tracking systems). Most ATS’s are not kind to new grads since they are programmed to check for a strong keyword match. Since most recent grads have limited experience, they don’t score high on an ATS (Only 25% of resumes make it past the resume robots). If you do have a strong skills match with a job posting, take the time to use the same exact words in your resume so the resume robots pick them out. Your resume can also be discarded if you format it incorrectly. Keep the layout simple with commonly used section titles like profile, work experience, education, etc.

4. Emphasize skills, experience, and results in the “Action + Numbers = Results” format.

Employers now give twice as much importance to specific skills and work experience as academic courses and grades. How do you make your abilities and skills stand out when you’re a new grad with limited work experience? It might take more effort than for an experienced job seeker, but you have more experience and accomplishments than you realize. Make a list of everything you’ve ever accomplished in internships, school projects, volunteer activities, part-time jobs, and the like. Then, follow this formula to create a powerful results bullet:

Action + Numbers = Results

Did [A] + as measured by [N] = with these results [R]

Here are a few examples of how college students and recent grads have created marketable results bullets out of internships and part-time jobs:

• Raised $55,000 in first month calling alumni for university capital
campaign; the top student performer all four weeks.

• As a brand ambassador interning at X Company, challenged to increase
website traffic, wrote ten blog posts that generated over 240 responses,
and helped boost sales.

• Prepared detailed Excel reports and pitches for business development
group at fast-growing technology company that
increased response rate by 15%.

The key to a successful resume and job search is to go for quality over quantity. You need to invest a little more time to create a resume that is right for each job, but it will pay off. Your efforts will be rewarded, and you’ll be on your way to an interview in no time.

Catherine Kaputa, guest writer

Catherine Kaputa, guest writer

Catherine Kaputa is a Personal Brand Strategist, Speaker, and Author of the newly-released book, Graduate to a Great Career: How Smart Students, New Graduates, and Young Professionals Can Launch Brand You. (April 2016. graduatetoagreatcareer.com). She is the author of two best-selling books, You Are a Brand and Breakthrough Branding for entrepreneurs. She is the Founder of SelfBrand (selfbrand.com). Speaking clients include Google, PepsiCo, Microsoft, Intel, Citi, Merck, Northwestern University, New York University, and University of Illinois.