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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 31, 2018 by

Recruitment marketing strategies for college students and grads

 

“It’s an increasingly tough marketplace out there on both sides, and that customer understanding can go a long way for the company’s recruiting and all these applicants who want to land a great place to be.” That is from Nancie Ruder, owner of Noetic Consultants, a marketing consulting firm that specializes in brand strategy, research and training. Ruder will speak at SHRM 2018, presenting “Unlocking Marketing Strategy to Optimize Recruitment.” I spoke with Ruder to get her insight into effective recruitment marketing to college students and recent grads. We chatted about measuring success, what Gen Z wants, and non-traditional student recruitment. Here are the takeaways from our conversation. (more…)

Posted December 14, 2016 by

Tweak your application process to be more respectful

 

The same tools that save recruiters time often make the application process feel robotic and cold, at least from the job seeker’s point of view. As you work to woo people into your company, it would be a bad idea to turn them off. You can use time-saving technology and still be respectful and applicant-centric.

Your employer brand will suffer if you don’t take steps to be respectful.

Any negativity that a candidate experiences can go viral. Your employer brand doesn’t just depend on the culture you create for current employees. The experience you create for potential employees, including everyone who never gets an interview, is also part of your company brand. Recruiters may groan at having to sift through 500 resumes for a single position, but that’s a gold mine for branding. That resume stack represents a captive audience. Unlike your passive followers on social media who you wish would just click “like” occasionally, those job applicants are eagerly waiting to hear from you.

Recruitment skills are like sales skills, so recruiters: sell your brand and your company’s experience. Don’t overlook how important your own customer service skills are. Your candidates are your customers.

Don’t risk losing the top candidates

When you treat candidates like a herd of cattle, think about who you are losing. Employers large and small consistently place soft skills at the top of their wish list. Those skills include integrity, dependability, communication, and ability to work with others. A candidate with high integrity will drop out of the race quickly if they sense that a recruiter doesn’t regard them as worth more than a few seconds of their time. If you lose integrity from your pool, what do you have left?

Juli Smith, President of The Smith Consulting Group, agrees that the lack of respect for candidates has consequences. “It can be very devastating to hear nothing.  Even bad news can be taken better than radio silence for days or weeks.” Candidates may have gotten used to being treated insignificantly during the job search, but that doesn’t mean they’ll put up with it for much longer. As companies start to figure out how to treat them better, you don’t want to be the last company standing with a humorless, disrespectful and overly-automated job application process.

A few little tweaks can make a difference

Like other great salespeople, good recruiters know how to read people. Let your recruiters bring their own humanness to the process. Don’t stifle their instincts to be respectful by automating every step of the way. If they truly have no time to insert a human touch along the way, then ask the most jovial member of your team to come up with better automated responses to candidates. Compare these two auto-emails:  (more…)

Posted November 10, 2016 by

College Recruiting Bootcamp: featuring Andrew Morton

andrew-morton director of social engagementWho is Andrew Morton?

Director of Social Engagement at Society for Human Resource Management

What you’ll hear from Andrew at the Bootcamp:

How to market your employer brand to Gen Y and Gen Z

Why you’d be wise to listen to Andrew’s advice:

After serving 20-years as an Army Officer and then as an Account Director at an advertising firm, Andrew now serves as the Director of Social Engagement at the Society for Human Resource Management, a global HR professional organization. Andrew believes that the pillars of any successful communications campaign are: sharing an organization’s story by developing content that’s both real and relevant, creating a community-management strategy that is responsive and sustainable and fostering strategic growth that allows an organization to shape its brand internally and externally.

Andrew’s specialties are public relations executive, marketing, account and brand management, social media, web development, media marketing and relations, strategic communications, advertising, TV and digital production, market analysis, speech writing, media training and event management.

 

The College Recruiting Bootcamp will be focused, fast and mentally challenging. Join us in D.C. on December 8, 2016 at the SEC headquarters. Reserve your space today!

Posted November 07, 2016 by

Creating a positive work culture

 

There is a lot of talk about the importance of organizational culture — and making sure you develop a positive one. Research by Deloitte earlier in 2016 shows it’s one of the major concerns of senior leaders across multiple industries. So, how do you create a positive work culture — especially for younger workers who will become the backbone of your talent acquisition strategy?

The first issue or concern that usually arises here is the word itself. “Culture” is fairly amorphous as a concept; it can mean different things to different people. Some want open communication from managers and a continuing sense of respect at all levels. Still others want kegerators and ping-pong tables available in lounge areas. All three of these perceptions are very different, but all could easily be called “culture” in the eyes of different employees.

Entire books have been written on this topic; heck, entire sections of bookstores have been written on this topic, in reality. It can’t be solved in one blog post, but here are some places to begin:

Care: You need to care about culture as a real strategic element in your business. If you only care about money and making as much of it as possible, fine. Good luck balancing that with staff retention. 

Bring culture outside of HR. Too often, culture discussions are housed in Human Resources. This makes sense on one level as they tend to own personnel matters, but your culture can’t be a series of HR-initiated documents. The sheer term “culture” refers to daily actions all over a company; this sense of culture needs to be be owned by different teams and levels, not just HR. A good example of mutual ownership with solid results is Dreamworks, where managers encourage increased responsibilities and often engage in spontaneous discussions with employees about what they think. Dreamworks’ feature films have grossed $13.48 billion worldwide, with an average of about $421.4 million per film. While there’s not a direct causation between internal management style and external results, the correlation is likely quite strong.

Core values: One way that can happen is by working together to set core values. By “working together” here, we mean cross-silos. We also mean that employees get to weigh in on core values as the company grows, as opposed to them just being set by the highest leadership levels. Netflix, which has become a highly-successful company financially, is a good example of a process around setting core values together. These core values, once set, can’t be a static document — they need to be lived (by as many people as possible) and adjusted annually, if not quarterly.

Perks determination: Part of a good work culture is perks, whether that’s a kegerator or every other Friday off or something else. Work from senior leadership to finance/accounting to HR to determine what perks are possible and fiscally viable. Create a list of potential perks and poll your employees. The top three vote-getters become a series of perks in the short-term. Revisit the idea in six months and see how it’s going. Scripps Health in San Diego is particularly good at this; for example, their bonus pool is filtered (relatively) equally throughout the organization, as opposed to just the higher ranks. They also offer tuition reimbursement, on-site massage, and pet insurance.

Priority alignment: In terms of the actual work that needs to be done, make sure there’s priority alignment around what needs to be done and in what order. Many companies, even very fiscally successful ones, are quite bad at this. Usually, poor priority alignment creates a lot of competing, urgent projects for employees. This ultimately burns them out, which increases turnover. High turnover runs directly counter to a good culture, because if people are constantly in and out, a culture can’t really emerge. You want to keep turnover down, and priority alignment is one major approach to doing so. So who does this well? Many companies, including ARM — which makes microprocessors for 95 percent of the world’s smart devices. (You’ve never heard of them, but they’re very important to your daily life.) ARM designs priority alignment around innovation, making sure everyone knows what to work on — and when — in the interest of potential collaborations and new project growth.

Managerial training: We’ve all heard the old adage — “People leave managers, not jobs.” That’s largely true. Here’s a not-so-good statistic: 82 percent of managerial hires end up being the wrong one. That’s an over 8 in 10 failure rate. Now consider this statistic: in North America, on average, a person becomes a manager for the first time at age 30. They get their first training on how to be a manager at age 42. That’s a gap of 12 years. There’s likely a correlation between that 12-year gap and the 82 percent failure rate in the first research. When you don’t train managers and leave them to figure out for themselves, they can operate poorly (or become micromanagers), and that’s dangerous to the establishment of a good culture. There are dozens of examples of good companies for managerial training, but one that regularly surfaces in case studies is Bridgespan (a consultancy for nonprofits), who uses a 70-20-10 career development model. Remember, too, that management preferences have changed over the years, as millennials bring their own managing styles and expectations.

Want to learn more about work culture, as well as recruitment and retention best practices? Stay connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted February 26, 2016 by

Focusing on branding in college recruiting

In recruiting college students, recruiters should focus on employer branding. An employer brand represents what a company stands for; it’s why or why not job seekers will work for a business. Brian Easter, Co-Founder of Nebo Agency, explains how his company recruits college students with care and dedication.

Photo of Brian Easter

Brian Easter, Co-Founder of Nebo Agency

“Nebo’s success has been a direct result of our human-centered approach to doing business. It’s because we respect users we’re able to craft successful, long-term strategies for clients over short-term gains; it’s because we love and value clients we build lasting relationships with them; and it’s because we see culture as our competitive advantage we’ve been able to fill the Nebo ranks with the industry’s best people.

As such, we fiercely defend our culture by standing up for our employees at all times. We will fire and have fired clients on the spot when they question the value of our employees’ hard work. Like we’ve always said, Nebo was started to repair a broken industry, and it’s a goal we have in mind at every step.

We’d put the growth opportunities at Nebo against any other agency. More than half of our management positions are staffed by people who started as interns or in entry-level positions. We promote from within to maintain our culture, and we think it’s important to reward good work. We hire people who have potential to grow with the agency, meaning they are passionate, intelligent, have integrity, and want to make the world a better place. We hire people who have a greater mission. Nebo promotes based on merit and does not withhold promotions to make new employees “pay their dues.”

This manner of care and dedication to our employees translates to how we recruit and attract college students to Nebo. We are actively involved with a number of southeastern colleges, particularly the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech, in part because of their vicinities to our Atlanta office, but also because we are an office divided with proud Bulldawg and Jacket grads. Throughout the year, we attend career fairs, advertising, marketing, and PR organizational events, as well as host agency tours.

Whenever we plan an appearance at a college event, we don’t settle for just distributing basic fliers. We want our presence to reflect our unique culture at Nebo. Whether that means a contest guessing the number of jelly beans in a jar, giving away a drone or scholarship money to someone with the most compelling tweet, or personalizing t-shirts to embrace each school, we want students to know we are as excited to be there as they are. We always strive to provide every student with a remarkable experience with the Nebo brand.

Every year, Nebo receives thousands of resumes with a large majority from current college students, so we like to think our approach to engaging college students is working. We’ve made it our mission to create a place where the industry’s top talent comes together to help clients make the world a better place.”

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

As Co-Founder of Nebo, Brian Easter brings international experience to his role along with a proven track record of helping organizations reach their digital marketing objectives. Under his leadership, Nebo has enjoyed 12 straight years of growth, has never laid a single employee off, and has won over 100 digital awards in just the past years alone.

Posted March 09, 2015 by

Employer Branding: Why and How to Tell Students the Story of Your Local, State, or Federal Agency

On December 8, 2014, human resource leaders from federal, state, and local government agencies came together at the offices of the U.S. General Services Administration for a day of intense learning about how your agency can more efficiently and effectively recruit recent college grads and students.

The College Recruiting Bootcamp event was organized by College Recruiter, the leading niche job board used by recent college graduates searching for entry-level jobs and students hunting for internships.

In this video, Dmitry Zhmurkin, Director of Bureau of Workforce Development Partnership for the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, delivers his presentation on, “Branding: Why and How to Tell Students the Story of Your Local, State, or Federal Agency.” To download the PowerPoint for the presentation, click here.

(more…)

Posted December 03, 2014 by

Not Every Employer has the Brand of Google

Highway signpost with Employer Branding wording

Highway signpost with Employer Branding wording. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

There are a few companies out there that every candidate knows – Google, Facebook, IBM, Microsoft, and so on.

Then there are the rest of us. Our organizations provide as good of a work environment as the ‘big boys’ – maybe better! But if candidates don’t know who we are, our hiring efforts become more challenging. (more…)

Posted June 02, 2014 by

Interview of Jimmy McCourt of College Recruiter at the College Recruiting Bootcamp

In this interview by Rob Humphrey of LinkedIn at the May 5, 2014 College Recruiting Bootcamp, Jimmy McCourt discusses the importance to organizations of having a strong employment brand which is consistent with your consumer brand.

The College Recruiting Bootcamp was organized by College Recruiter and co-hosted by LinkedIn at its headquarters in Mountain View, California. Over 100 corporate university relations leaders attended and more than 3,000 registered for the livestream. The Bootcamp was designed to help these staffing leaders more efficiently and effectively hire college and university students and recent graduates.
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Posted May 31, 2013 by

4 Issues for Employers Looking to Fill Jobs for Recent College Graduates and Other Positions

When it comes to talent in the job market, employers have questions on how they should approach different areas.  In the following post, learn four issues that employers should consider when trying to fill jobs for recent college graduates and other positions, as well as improving their brands.

by Claes Peyron Where is the talent market heading? What are the developments that we can expect in the coming years? What should we focus on to prepare for the changes to come? These are some of the questions that employers are asking themselves and perhaps more often today, given the rapid changes going on in the global

See the article here –

Introducing The Talent Agenda

Posted May 22, 2013 by

Hiring for Recent College Graduate Jobs? 3 Ways Using Big Data Can Help You Find Top Talent

If you plan to hire for recent college graduate jobs or other positions in your company, using big data effectively may help you find top talent.  Learn three ways to do so in the following post.

Like much of the language used in recruiting and HR, it’s easy to be intimidated by terms like “big data,” “social API” and “CRM.” But don’t worry if that futuristic-sounding jargon goes over your head. You can still learn from these new trends and apply these ideas to improve your recruiting

Originally posted here:

3 Ways Recruiters Can Use Big Data to Find the Best Job Candidates