• What’s the difference between diversity and inclusion?

    September 20, 2016 by
    Ted Bauer

    Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

    By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

    Diversity is a complicated topic, especially in this modern political climate where it seems like many are trying to define other groups as the enemy. It’s also semantically complicated — it means many different things to many different people. Some think of it as skin color, some as gender, some along socioeconomic lines. It varies.

    What’s more — diversity and inclusion are actually very different concepts, although they’re not often treated as such. Your efforts at diverse recruiting need to differentiate between the two ideas. Continue Reading

  • How do you actually hit your diversity recruiting targets?

    September 16, 2016 by
    Ted Bauer

    Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

    By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

    We all know diversity needs to be a priority in recruiting, but many of us struggle with this daily.

    There are best practices all over the Internet for diversity recruiting — Harvard has a particularly good one — and there are numerous lists of good companies for diversity, including Black Enterprise’s version and Fortune’s version.

    There are organizations out there doing diversity recruiting properly, and here’s the central thing all of them have in common: they diversify (logically) their pipelines. If you’re predominantly on-campus, then you’re predominantly going to get the types of students on that campus. But if you’re on-campus and using digital tools and job boards, you can attract a wider grouping. Then, from a numbers perspective and a talent perspective, you’re set up for more success. Continue Reading

  • How to create ideal job postings to hire the right candidates

    August 05, 2016 by

     

    Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

    Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

    When writing job postings, you’re always trying to attract the best candidates for the job. You want to make sure whomever you hire is about as close to perfect as you can get.

    The only way to hire great people is to attract those same great people to apply. This is easier said than done. Most of the best candidates are working for other companies and not sitting around applying for jobs all day. Your job ad not only has to get them to apply, it has to get their attention in the first place.

    The good news, as you may have read at College Recruiter, is that although they’re not sitting around all day applying for jobs, 73% of current employees don’t mind looking for a new job while they’re still employed. Most of these people are young people, suggesting that they’re looking for something better.

    Keep this willingness to find new work at the forefront of your job description, and you’ll have more luck. Think about what your company can offer that other jobs can’t. Here are a few other things you can do that will help.

    Write an Advertisement

    Many employers will approach a job ad like they’re doing someone a favor. While this might be true of regular out-of-work job seekers, it’s not true if you’re looking for the right people. Employers often have a hard time finding these people.  If you approach this process with a me-first attitude, you’ll be missing out.

    Create a job advertisement like a sales pitch. Approach it like you do selling your product or service. Maybe even talk to your marketing team to see what they can come up with. You want people to see your ad and to act on it. It needs to be enticing, solve pain points, and have a clear call to action.

    Don’t just put up a bullet point list of duties and qualifications. Bullet points are easy to read; you just want to make sure they say something of value. If you’re just listing things, there’s nothing enticing about that. You’re asking people to uproot their lives, leave a solid paying job, and work for you. You must be convincing.

    Tips from Content Marketing

    Most companies know they need to create great content in order to get that content viewed by other people – why not put those tips to work with your job ad?

    • Subheadings. Make your job ad easy to read and something they can skim. You may not have a lot of time, so you’ll want to get your point across. Use subheadings and bullet points to illustrate various sections and key perks.
    • Length. Don’t go crazy writing the next great American novel. You’ll want to keep it at and easy to read length. Too long, and you’ll lose them. Too short, and you may not give them enough info.
    • Make it Sharable. Content marketers use this strategy very effectively to get their message out. Use it in job postings. Even if the gig isn’t for them, if it’s interesting enough, they’ll share it. Some companies now hire on social media for this reason.
    • Make it Interesting. Don’t just write a typical ad. Make it stand out. Make it different. All the things that make great content sharable – do it here. The more interesting, funny, or unusual the job ad, the more likely it will be shared and attract applicants.

    Company Culture

    It’s not just about salary anymore. It’s about the company itself. What does the company stand for? Are the hours flexible? What kind of perks exist? You’ll want to outline these in the ad. Talking about your company is key to getting someone to quit an existing job and work for you.

    People want to feel a connection with the company they work for. They don’t want to feel like a mindless drone. Work doesn’t always have to be fun, but if you have to do, wouldn’t you choose the place that most fit your lifestyle?

    If you’re looking to attract creative individuals, you’ll need to give them an environment they can thrive in. Ensure the company culture is built around this, illustrate it in your job ad, and you shouldn’t have a problem.

    Job Description and Title

    The job description is the meat of job postings/job ads. You’ll want to do your best to make the title and description stand out.

    • Be Specific. Let the potential applicants know exactly what the job is. Don’t sugar coat it. That’s what the rest of the ad is for.
    • Qualifications. Be clear about what’s required. If they can learn on the job, say so. If not, let them know that too. It’ll weed out poor applicants.
    • Type of Employment. Full time? Part time? Be clear upfront if you want to attract the right candidate.
    • Growth. Is there opportunity to move up the ladder? Throw it in there.
    • Salary and Benefits. This will help attract those people that are in your price range. Don’t be afraid to list this thinking it will scare people away. If it’s actually the salary range you’re offering, the people it scares away are out of your price range. Don’t waste your time.

    Finding the right candidate is all about attracting the right applicants. Be bold with your job ad. Be truthful. Don’t worry about scaring people away. They won’t be the right ones for you anyway.

    If your job ad reflects your company personality, you’ll have much better luck at finding the right people that will fit in.

    Do you need help filling part-time jobs, internships, or entry-level job openings within your company or organization? College Recruiter can help. We offer a variety of advertising solutions for employers and talent acquisition professionals. 

    Rick Riddle, guest writer

    Rick Riddle, guest writer

    About the author:

    Rick Riddle is a successful blogger whose articles aim to help readers with self-development, entrepreneurship and digital marketing. Connect with Rick on twitter and LinkedIn.

  • 10 digital skills to help you land an amazing job

    July 25, 2016 by
    Young photographer at the studio doing some retouching photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    The digital age arrives with many benefits. Our lives are faster, online, and the information is easily accessible at the click of a button. However, you cannot be left behind, and you need to keep up with technology because it might end up replacing you if you don’t. In fact, it’s already happening. Many jobs that have been a staple of society in the past 100 years are slowly being given to automatons.

    Those are the jobs that require little social interaction and are based on pure demand or logical thinking. A human employee in simple services can be replaced by a few buttons. We’re moving forward, and many already believe that the younger generation needs to make sure their digital skills are sharp in order to fit into the future. How do you defeat this robotization of services and jobs? Learn to be the one who controls and creates them.

    It does not mean you necessarily have to learn how to build robots, but it means that you need to understand what sort of skills and talents future employees expect from you. Digital skills are certainly among them because they will play a major role in shaping the future. Your concern should be to belong among those who participate, instead of those who just watch, and here’s what you should definitely know to land a great job.

    1. SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

    Even though SEO has been around for quite a while, it’s not known to many who have had no handle in creating or taking care of a website. However, keep in mind that skills using it are required by around 14% of companies in the digital industry, and that number is expected to grow. It’s an essential tool used to optimize a website in order for it to generate traffic and conversation. It’s an imperative skill for many jobs and one that will definitely impress employers in the industry.

    2. Coding (HTML5 or JavaScript)

    It may sound like a no-brainer, but coding is a major part of web browsing, especially in an age where websites are becoming more interactive. Numerous tech giants have switched to HTML5, dropping previous languages in order to create a better and seamless internet experience. The same applies to JavaScript, which works greatest with animation and making interaction an easy process. They’re tools that will be used in the future and some highly recommended for those interested in the field.

    3. PPC (Pay-Per-Click)

    In essence, it’s a very simple method that companies are looking for regarding marketing. It implies increasing a specific website’s traffic by buying ads on search engines that make potential customers click on it. However, you need to hone your skills in identifying promising keywords, creating a compelling ad, and measure the results. These will be excellent skills to have if you’re aiming to submit a winning job application at a tech titan in the industry.

    4. Analytics

    It’s not enough to implement digital strategies. Analytics are crucial and highly sought-after by employers because it means you are comfortable with analyzing and evaluating how those techniques are progressing. You need to be able to compare them constantly with others and provide excellent insight. It’s an incredible skill that will certainly land you a job. Everyone is looking to get better.

    5. Android or iOS Development

    Smartphones are taking over, and learning either one of these two platforms will look great on your resume. They have tremendous potential for the future because they are not going anywhere. You could find an amazing job if you master at least one of them.

    6. PaaS (Platform as a Service)

    Cloud software is everywhere, and many believe that they will ultimately become the quintessential platform for companies. PaaS is a tool that will help you develop these web applications that will no longer require customers to download sizeable programs on their hard drives. It’s a builder of accessibility.

    7. Personal branding

    Through the use of social media, you can create an excellent personal brand that will land you a fantastic job. You only need to learn how to do it. It implies understanding the use of all social media platforms, including Facebook, LinkedIn, websites, blogs, and everything else to create a beneficial image of yourself.

    8. Writing online content

    Everything is on the internet, and the ability to create quality content is highly sought-after. If you combine it with SEO and a few marketing skills, you could reach for a high-paying digital marketing job. It’s important to know how to flow between platforms, and manage your content for every situation.

    9. Web design and creating websites

    There are numerous tools out there to use, and mastering a majority of them will certainly make you desired on the job market. All you need is a bit of coding, tremendous amounts of creativity, and the patience to actually learn all the tools. Everyone and everything needs a website. Be the one who creates them, and you will be needed as well.

    10. Image and video editing

    Online digital media is in full force, so there will always be a need for someone who has extensive skills of image and video editing. Be it for advertising, marketing, or basically any industry, these are very valuable skills to learn. They look impressive on your resume, and every company needs someone with these abilities. If you truly want to impress them, grab the Adobe collection and master it.

    We have moved fast into the future, and our steps need to be quick in order to keep up. Basic knowledge of Microsoft Office is now not something employers require, but something they expect. Focus on the most advanced tools that will set you apart from the crowd of millennials still stuck behind technology.

    Want more information about how to integrate technology into your career? Visit our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Amanda Wilks, guest writer

    Amanda Wilks, guest writer

    Amanda Wilks is a digital marketing intern and a part-time writer, passionate about social media and personal branding. She loves helping individuals create unique online identities and achieve their much-desired professional acclaim.

  • Hiring managers value first impressions and referrals

    July 08, 2016 by
    Friendly woman in business formal outfit photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    When attending your next career networking event, remember that hiring managers are watching your every move from the moment you enter the door until the second they begin networking with another job seeker. You can separate yourself from the competition by making the right first impression with recruiters. In addition, you should tell potential employers if you know someone at the particular company or organization. Referrals improve your chances of getting a foot in the door because a current employee can vouch for you, which hiring managers will respect. Internal referrals—referrals made by employees working within the organization—are the best kind of referrals to obtain. Never pass up an opportunity to mention people you know who work for an organization, particularly if you have genuine relationships with those individuals. This isn’t name dropping; it’s networking.

    Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, shares his opinions on networking to find jobs and how networking influences hiring managers.

    “Networking is the best way to find a job no matter what industry you are in. Those of us in hiring positions are constantly receiving resumes from recruiters and job applicants, and it’s really impossible for us to sift through the good resumes from the bad ones. When either meeting someone personally who impresses us or getting introduced to someone through a trusted friend, we’re much more willing to look at a resume and contact the applicant, and we also have social pressure to do so.”

    Find more networking tips on our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

    Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

    Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

    Eden Chen is the Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, one of the fastest growing software development agencies in the US. Eden is a serial entrepreneur and heads up various other startups including Knife and Fox (design agency), Ctrl Collective (co-working), Glo Bible (app with 3 million+ downloads), Zolo Studios (game studio), and Dev Crew (international software development).

  • How to network in the workplace

    July 07, 2016 by
    Two businessmen talking and smiling photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Congratulations on landing your new entry-level job or internship! Perhaps you landed it through networking. If so, that means you understood how to approach interacting with family, friends, and/or recruiting and talent acquisition professionals during your job search.

    Now it’s time to transition from networking to find a job to networking in the workplace. This is an opportunity to demonstrate your skills and qualities and learn from established employees who can help you along the way. Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services and LEEP Center Adviser at Clark University, explains how new hires should approach networking in the workplace.

    “The first step is to establish yourself as a hard-working, competent, young professional. Making a good first impression in your new role will get your colleagues’ attention and increase the likelihood they will be willing to assist in your career development. At the same time, you need to assimilate into the culture of your organization and begin to create collegial working relationships. If you begin networking too early, it may appear you are too focused on your future rather than your current role.

    Once you have established yourself, identify someone one level above you whose position or career path you’re interested in. Start with people you already know. Your goal is to secure an informational interview where you ask questions about the professional’s career trajectory and solicit advice on your potential goals. People generally like to talk about themselves and like to give advice, so you should get a positive response as long as you are polite and professional.

    Another goal of that conversation should be expanding your network by asking the professional for names of other professionals they can introduce you to. Etiquette is important in this process so remember that written communication should be formal and professional, and follow-up thank you notes are essential. Above all, be willing to listen and be open to the advice you receive.”

    Need more help with networking? Learn more on our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center

    Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center

    Vickie Cox-Lanyon is Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center at Clark University. Cox-Lanyon provides career and academic guidance to students and alumni throughout their career development process. She has been in the field of career services since 1997 and is a member of the National Career Development Association, the National Association of Colleges and Employers, and the Liberal Arts Career Network, through which she participates in annual professional development activities. She holds a BA in Psychology from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and an MS in Psychology from the University of Rhode Island.

  • Being honest and engaged during the onboarding process

    June 23, 2016 by
    Smiling graduate student with diploma photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    As recent college graduates and entry-level job candidates prepare to enter the workforce, they should prepare for the onboarding process. New hires should stay focused and take notes during the onboarding process to get the most out of it. Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany, shares his best advice for recent grads and entry-level job candidates while onboarding.

    “The best advice I can give recent grads and entry-level candidates is to be honest and stay engaged. Onboarding requires plenty of attention, focus, and an ability to retain information in a short amount of time.

    Recent grads and candidates engage in this process to learn their expectations, gain a deeper understanding of their companies and their employers, meet their team, and see how they can succeed in their new roles. It’s exciting, not a chore, so direct energy in the best way by sitting up straight and staying interactive.

    Take your own notes and actively listen. Continue taking notes while performing tasks. These notes will be helpful because you can review them after training to increase your knowledge. They will also inform some well thought out questions and feedback.

    When trainers ask for feedback, share your thoughts. When you don’t understand something about a process or task, ask questions. Many new hires are nervous and don’t feel comfortable speaking up, but allowing fear to stand in the way is incredibly detrimental to your training and your relationship with your employer.

    The bottom line of onboarding is to set expectations, train employees on processes, and build a trusting relationship. Communication and engagement are crucial.”

    Want to help recent grads and entry-level job candidates in the onboarding process? Get some assistance and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

    Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

    Andre Lavoie is the CEO of ClearCompany, the first talent alignment platform that bridges the gap between talent management and business strategy by contextualizing employees’ work around a company’s vision and goals. You can connect with him and the ClearCompany team on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

  • 6 hiring trends job seekers should watch for in 2016

    June 19, 2016 by

    “Congratulations! We are pleased to inform you that you are hired in our organization.”

    No matter how many times you have read these magical words, they sound just as thrilling as you read them the first time. If you intend to read them again in your mail this year, then luckily the time is right for you to make a job transition.

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    2016 brings a wave of new opportunities. As unemployment hits the lowest record since the last five years, there is more scope for job seekers to find better work opportunities; hiring is on the rise. However, this is not the only good news of the New Year. There are also the growing economic conditions that will have a positive impact on the pay scale and perks of employees, making it a perfect time to switch jobs.

    On one hand, this is a sigh of relief for job seekers who lived through the ordeal of recession and unemployment in the past couple of years. It also poses many challenges to recruiters who will have to revisit their company policies to compete in the market.

    Without further ado, let’s find out what other hiring trends the year holds for the job seekers:

    1. Social media will rule the roost

    Social media is ubiquitous. As it emerges as a new tool for hiring talent, your social presence will have a say in the success of your job application. Now is the time to update your social profiles as employers will be evaluating you through your presence on major social media platforms.

    Having an impressive online profile will not only increase your outreach to potential employers, but it will also get you in front of lucrative job opportunities offered by leading organizations. Therefore, it is high time for you to create strong profiles on leading social media websites, such as LinkedIn and Twitter.

    2. Hiring for remote workers will increase

    With improvement in collaboration tools, remote employees have evolved as an alternative workforce. No longer do recruiters have to resort to “in-house hiring” process which is both costly and time-consuming for the companies. Since employers can freelance work, the remote work culture will continue to thrive in 2016.

    So, if you are a part-time academic writer who offers assignment assistance with quality, you can make it a full-time job this year by finding freelance work opportunities.

    3. Flexible work will no longer be a dream

    In 2016, the employee’s fantasy of flexible work will become a corporate reality. With changing corporate cultures and attitudes, more businesses are inclining their hiring policies towards flexible work programs. The current year will see a rapid growth in businesses offering flexible hours and alternative work spaces which help them accommodate talent who cannot work under the regular work scenarios.

    4. Boomerang hires will be on the rise

    According to a survey by Workplace Trends, 76% of the companies are welcoming of the employees who once worked with them. As this hiring trend increases in popularity, more job seekers look for rehiring opportunities for their next job role.

    5. Video resumes will become more trendy

    With hiring getting more personal, more recruiters will expect to see video resumes of job seekers. In fact, a number of companies have already made video resume a compulsory thing in their job description. So, if you have not yet created a personalized video of your career description, it is about time to shoot a video long enough to demonstrate your professional skills and personal traits.

    6. Referral hiring will take the lead

    Referral hiring cuts down on the recruitment budget that employers have to bear with traditional hiring. With every passing year, it is emerging as a primary source of hiring workers. If implemented effectively, the referral hiring can significantly save the time and money of a company. As companies come to realize the valuable benefits of this form of hiring, more businesses will be investing in referral programs to hire talent.

    2016 is a happening year for job seekers. Get ready for the above-mentioned six trends to make your way to a successful career transition this year.

    Kaelynn Bailee, guest writer

    Kaelynn Bailee, guest writer

      Kaelynn Bailee is a HR manager working for a new start up that provides both educators and learners a platform to meet and discuss everything education. She also loves blogging and from time to time writes for other blogs.

  • Onboarding process can include background check

    June 10, 2016 by
    Recruitment photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Before bringing new hires into their companies, employers might want to give each one a background check. These days, recruiters and hiring managers use social media as a tool to learn more about candidates, so take advantage of it and other helpful resources. After all, companies shouldn’t just hire quality employees but quality people. John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource, explains including a background check as part of its onboarding process.

    “I work for OnSource, and we have a network of 15,000 people who conduct photo inspections for claims and underwriting purposes for insurance companies; the inspectors visit consumers and take photos of vehicles and property. The whole process for coming onboard as an inspector can take a few days. We require a background check, and if someone doesn’t have an existing background check, they will need to provide one to OnSource. We review the background check and then bring the applicants on board.”

    If you need help developing your onboarding program, College Recruiter can help. Follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

    John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource

    John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource

    John Cass manages OnSource’s marketing efforts for clients and OnSource’s network development.

    John has over 25 years of marketing and digital marketing experience. A pioneer in the content marketing industry, he has been responsible for directing and managing content marketing and social media campaigns. John is the author of Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging, published in 2007, and is a Founding Fellow of the Society for New Communications Research, Past President of the Boston Chapter of the American Marketing Association, and is the Co-Founder of the Boston Agile Marketing Meetup. He has worked at a number of technology brands including SDL and 48hourprint.com, was the Online Community Manager at Forrester Research, and has worked at several interactive and content agencies, including Pace Communications and Portent Interactive.

  • Why employees should put extra effort into impressing the boss

    June 06, 2016 by
    Woman raising her hand to ask question photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    At the very beginning of your career, you may be faced with the fact that all the knowledge and the diplomas in the world will not be enough to save you if you are on your boss’s bad side. You will end up watching from your cubicle how other people are getting promoted, while you are sitting there and doing the same things you have done on your first day at work.

    You see, when people graduate they are full of confidence and hope, and that is not a bad thing, but books and tests are just the basics that should be upgraded with experience and interpersonal relationships. One of the people who can affect your professional growth the most is your boss, and you should do your best to make that relationship productive and mutually beneficial.

    Learning from your boss

    One of the main reasons why you should have a good relationship your boss is the opportunity to learn from someone who is in a position you would love to be in the future. If you are constantly giving your maximum with work tasks and showing consistency and dedication, you will have the right to participate in some important conversations and find out many valuable things, not only about the company you are working in, but also about the road to success.

    Self-improving

    At first, your motivation may be just to impress your boss, but as time goes on, your dedication and efforts will grow to become habits and make your career success even more certain. Showing up to work early and taking initiative might seem like “sucking up” to your boss to other employees and to you yourself, but actually, when you think about it, there is nothing wrong with these actions. On the contrary, they showcase you as a well-educated and ambitious man/woman.

    You are the image of your boss

    … and vice versa. A good boss surrounds himself with competent people, and if you show to be anything other but that, you will not only make your boss look bad, but also create a negative image about yourself, which can impact your position in the firm, and even future employment opportunities. If you on the other hand, do your best to make your boss succeed, you will show that you are a great employee worthy of going up the corporate ladder.

    Improving your current job

    If you want to love the job you are doing, you have to make it a job you can love. The best, and possibly the only way to do so, is to make your boss fond of you. If you are consistently productive and assigning for the difficult tasks, you will have a more pleasant relationship with your boss, which will make your working hours less stressful. Beyond that, you will get better assignments and maybe become the right-hand-man/woman.

    Getting promoted

    The ultimate goal of every employee would never even be considered without a long process of impressing the boss. After all, your boss is the one handling the decisions about transfer of the employees to a better job. If you notice he is giving you some extra projects and work, accept it with enthusiasm, because this can be a part of grooming you for higher jobs, and eventually even his position. So, make sure you are on his radar by struggling to get new challenges and more recognition, instead of struggling to get your work done.

    Some people would love to spend their days at work unnoticed to avoid conflicts and critiques, but by doing so, they are also avoiding praises and opportunities. Do not be one of those people and fight your way up to the top, in a struggle where impressing your boss is your best chance to succeed.

    In search of more career advice? Come to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Nate Vickery, guest writer

    Nate Vickery, guest writer

    Nate Vickery is a marketing manager and a blogger. He is also the editor-in-chief at BizzMarkBlog.