ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 29, 2019 by

Here’s How We Make Productivity the Result, Not the Goal

As founder and CEO of Journeous, which helps young adults choregraph meaningful careers, Pam Baker will be bringing 20+ years of hiring, managing, mentoring and coaching expertise Join us for the College Recruiting Bootcamp on Diversity and Inclusion.)

“Motivation is the art of getting people to do what you want them to do because they want to do it.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

What motivates you? As someone dedicated to supporting those starting their journey, along with the organizations they work for, to make the most of what each of us brings to the world, I understand the importance of motivation. Yet, I was reminded recently of how different motivators can be for each person.

The first reminder came during lunch with a former colleague – someone I respect immensely who I’d feel fortunate to call a teammate once again. She’d recently started a new job at a hot tech company and despite the majority of MBA students I mentor expressing an interest in working there, she was flabbergasted by its lack of vision and focus. They’re a typical Silicon Valley tech company offering free lunch, ping pong tables and no expectation that anyone ever tucks in a shirt.

She couldn’t understand why people were clamoring to work there. With little leadership grit or direction, she equally couldn’t relate to why people wanted to stay. As I looked around the lunch area, though, it hardly looked like a bunch of demotivated and disengaged employees. The ping pong table was in use, and there was lots of animated chatter and laughter around us. I’ve been around checked out people. This was not such a group.

Winning is Motivation… For Some

My twin daughters provided a second reminder. They’d both played defense on the same soccer team, which ended up winning a total of one game during the season. As I drove them home after their last game, I asked them what they’d thought of the season. I looked in the rearview mirror to see one scrunching up her face and looking at me as if I’d asked the stupidest question possible (experience seeing that face a few dozen times now has helped me decode it). She grumbled, “It sucked. We only won one game all season.” My other daughter looked at her, then at me and said, “I thought it was great.” And then they looked at each other with their expressions seeming to say, “What team are YOU talking about?”

Same team, same position, same games attended, roughly the same playing time. But their motivators were entirely different. One wanted to win. Sure, she liked her team members, but she was driven to get better personally and as a team. The other wanted to be outside and be part of a team of girls she likes.

Their motivation for practicing was different: One wanted to get better, while the other wanted to be outside with her friends. Their motivation for games was also different: One wanted to see the result of her hard work at practice pay off with a win, while the other just wanted to be outside with her friends. Finally, as the season wound on with the losses piling up, their motivation for continuing was different: One because she knew she was getting better and could contribute to bringing the team up in the standings, while the other (you guessed it) could still be outside with her friends. She never even noticed what their team record was.

“Motivation will almost always beat mere talent.” – Norman Ralph Augustine

At my friend’s company, no doubt some were motivated by the company’s status. Others were driven by the freedom and flexibility. Still others by the occasional fun that was injected into their day since ping pong tables appeared to be as ubiquitous as bathrooms.

Leaders, and of course all of us are leaders in some capacity at work and home, must learn to understand and appreciate the differences in what motivates people, including ourselves. When we do, we unlock the key to staying engaged and motivated, as well as motivating those around us – in both easy and stressful situations.

Thankfully, there’s a science behind each of our motivations and needs. It might be the recognition of our work, of our convictions, or of who we are as an individual. It may involve giving us space and solitude, allowing for playful interactions, or incorporating action and excitement in our day.

Knowing and acting on the science behind our motivational needs keeps us from missing out on the talents of those around us. Improved productivity is the result (not the goal) and these diverse perspectives, talents and approaches then quickly become our most valued assets.

Join Pam Baker, along with your fellow university relations, talent acquisition and other human resource leaders from corporate, non-profit and government agencies at the:

College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY
Organized by College Recruiter and hosted by Ernst & Young
Thursday, December 12, 2019
9:30 AM – 2:30 PM (EST)
Ernst & Young World Headquarters
121 River Street
Hoboken, NJ 07030

For more information and tickets go to: http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/BootcampOnDIatEY

Pam Baker is Founder and CEO of Journeous, which empowers participants with new tools to dig in and find answers to complex questions like, “What are my personal values and how might they relate to my career?” Pam founded Journeous after a 20-year healthcare career spent building, leading and mentoring teams where she saw firsthand the challenge – for herself and colleagues – of creating fulfilling careers. Without understanding what was meaningful, though, it was easy to end up in jobs that didn’t click. As a mom of two daughters, Pam’s goal is to change the pattern for today’s young adults to help them choreograph meaningful careers.

The mission of Journeous is to prepare those starting a new journey and the organizations they work with to make the most of what each of us brings to the world. They provide your students and employees the tools to design a meaningful career and to thrive by mastering the art of adaptive communication.

To learn more, visit https://www.journeous.com/

Posted June 12, 2018 by

When and how HR tech can engage gig workers in your organization’s culture

If there is one person who knows about how HR leaders can and should choose the right technology tools, it is Sarah Brennan. Brennan is Founder and Chief Advisor at Accelir, where she dedicates herself to improving the impact of technology on people, business and the future of work. She partners with the companies that build the technology and she educates the companies that use that technology. Brennan was also selected to be an official SHRM 2018 blogger. I interviewed Brennan about how she is seeing the impact of the growing gig economy, and how HR leaders should be using (and not using) technology to engage their contracted and gig workers.  (more…)
Posted June 11, 2018 by

How Blain’s Farm and Fleet improves their retail employee performance

 

Andrew Marcotte knows how to improve the performance of entry-level retail employees. He is an HR Business Partner at Blain’s Farm and Fleet, a specialty discount retailer with 38 locations. Marcotte supports store operations and store management teams across all locations. He shared with us what they do to motivate, grow and develop entry-level employees and we have shared his insight below. Marcotte was selected as an official SHRM 2018 blogger.  (more…)

Posted May 17, 2018 by

Empowering managers to own employee engagement

 

HR leaders can empower managers to own their employees’ engagement and retention. I spoke with Anne Tomkinson, who is Senior Manager of HR and Operations at DC Public Charter School Board. Not only does her expertise stretch over all aspects of employment relations, employment law, strategic planning and program management, she also knows how to empower managers and give them the tools they need to develop and engage their team members. It’s less complicated than you might think. Tomkinson is an official SHRM 2018 blogger, and you can read more of her insight at HRunderground.wordpress.com. (more…)

Posted May 16, 2018 by

The transformation to HR positive: Interview with HR trailblazers

 

What does it mean to be HR Positive? I spoke with two HR leaders who are blazing their way to a new perception of HR at their own organizations. Cecilia Clark, Senior HR Generalist at Schwan’s, supplements her HR career with a background in Finance, so she is an expert in connecting business and HR strategy to positively affect the bottom line. Chris Orozco, at Win-River Resort and Casino, turned Human Resources into Team Member Relations, which he currently leads. They are both official SHRM 2018 bloggers, and you can read more of their thoughts on Cici’s own HR blog, and Chris’ personal blog “Create: Life and Leadership by Design.” (more…)

Posted April 12, 2018 by

How do you pay students and recent graduates when 10 percent don’t have bank accounts?

 

SHRM18 Blogger GraphicI have learned a lot over the years about millennials, and more recently, Gen Z, and how employers can and should recruit and engage them. Recently, however, I learned something new.

I was recently offered the opportunity to be one of the official bloggers for The Society for Human Resources Management national, annual conference, being held in Chicago in June 2018. I felt honored and thrilled about the opportunity to learn from presenters, moderators, panelists, and exhibitors prior to the conference. I learned something about millennials from Alicia Blanda, managing partner of ATM at Work and exhibitor at #SHRM18 (more…)

Posted April 03, 2018 by

Successful variable pay programs: Interview with John Rubino

 

Variable pay programs are rising in popularity. John Rubino, president and founder of Rubino Consulting Services (RCS), knows a lot about this trend and how employers are currently succeeding (and failing) at implementing variable pay programs. Rubino will be a speaker at SHRM 2018 conference, presenting “Successful Variable Pay Programs in Action: A Case Study Using a Proven Eight-Step Design Approach.” I connected with Rubino to get his insight into how to ensure success, what mistakes to avoid, and what it has to do with engaging entry-level employees.  (more…)

Posted January 04, 2018 by

HR metrics from the stay interview

 

Ideally, managers check in with their staff frequently, and not just to measure them against expectations but also to open up a dialogue about how each employee feels regarding their standing at the organization. Unfortunately, not all managers see this kind of check-in as a priority, or even their job. Therefore, it is important for Human Resources to formalize the “stay interview” as a necessary addition to your HR metrics. (more…)

Posted November 17, 2017 by

Workplace culture of happiness and leadership: How Whole Foods retains entry-level employees

 

One of the core values at Whole Foods Market is “team member happiness.” Making team members happy doesn’t happen by accident. Melissa Simpson, Talent Acquisition Manager, spoke with us about how their workplace culture is designed to keep employees engaged and to develop them into leaders.

Melissa Simpson will be joining other leaders in HR, talent acquisition and university relations at the College Recruiting Bootcamp on December 15. Simpson has deep insight into filling and moving the pipeline from entry-level to leadership, and we look forward to hearing more of her thoughts and questions at the event! To join us and hear what strategies and tactics you might not have considered yet to attract and retain entry-level talent, register for the bootcamp here. (more…)

Posted October 31, 2017 by

Retention strategies: Benefits that help retain millennial talent

 

Whether you add flashy perks to your benefits package, don’t forget that what millennials care about first (and really anyone, for that matter), is earning a competitive and fair wage, and job security. If your retention strategies don’t acknowledge that, this article may not be for you. As College Recruiter founder and president Steven Rothberg states, “compensation and job security are more important right now because both have been declining and young adults face far higher costs of living due, in large part, to exponentially higher student loan debt.” If you do offer a competitive salary and job security, then we here offer three employee benefits that can help retain your millennial talent. (more…)