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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 09, 2017 by

Strategies for recruiting data analytics and related skills

 

Do employers truly understand their own dire need for data analytics, or more broadly, data science and analytics skills? A new report says that by 2020, new job postings that require these skills will hit 2.72 million. There is a concerning gap between the expectations of educators and the expectations of business executives when it comes to getting students ready for the job market. That is according to a study released by the Business-Higher Education Forum and PwC.

If you are like most employers, in the next several years you will prefer job candidates with data science and analytics skills. And yet, only 23 percent of educators believe their graduates will possess those skills.

The report makes concrete suggestions for both employers and higher education. Here, we will highlight the recommendations for employers who need to harness skills in data science and analytics.

What exactly are data science and analytics skills?

According to the report, “The term analytics refers to the synthesis of knowledge from information. It’s one of the steps in the data life cycle: collection of raw data, preparation of information, analytics, visualization, and access. Data science is the extraction of actionable knowledge directly from data through either a process of discovery, or hypothesis formulation and hypothesis testing.”

People who need to make data-driven decisions include directors in Human Resources, Marketing, IT, and the C-suite. Data science jobs include systems analysts, data administrators, business intelligence analysts, data engineers and much more.

This skills gap affects much more than just data scientists. Jobs from the C-suite to the frontlines are increasingly affected by the need for analytics. According to the report, this is a revolution. “As with the revolution in work brought on by the personal computer (PC) 30 years ago, data science and analytics, hand in hand with machine intelligence and automation, are creating a new revolution in work.”

Businesses who do not attract and retain talent in data science and analytics will eventually be outcompeted.

What does a business do to attract and retain skills in data science and analytics?

The report details four recommendations to employers:

  1. Look beyond the diploma and hire for skills, too.

It’s time to admit that a degree is only a proxy for skill sets. While recruiters can argue the effectiveness of using proxies, it just doesn’t work with DSA skills. The market for these skills is full of disconnected dots. STEM grads are not necessarily prepared to use DSA in business, and business grads are not necessarily taught DSA skills. There is a growing number of DSA degrees, but they haven’t been around long enough for many recruiters to trust their viability, let alone assume they will make the list of annual campus visits.

Where does this leave us? According to the report, “It is left to hiring managers and recruiters to determine how candidates meet skill requirements in this changing environment. To do that they need two things: 1) a common nomenclature to trade in DSA competencies and skills; and 2) a closer, more collaborative relationship with higher education aimed at creating programs that will provide job candidates with the skills they need.”

Researchers have identified skills common to data science jobs across broad skill groups. Those are:

  • Applied domain skills (research or business)
  • Data analytics and machine learning
  • Data management and curation
  • Data science engineering
  • Scientific or research methods
  • Personal and interpersonal communication skills

Employers shouldn’t expect to find all of the above skills in one individual. Rather, they should use these skill groups as a guide to forming teams whose members collectively have a full skill set.

These skills fall into three categories that employers should assess: data analysis, decision-making and problem-framing: (more…)

Posted April 03, 2017 by

Gender diversity in tech: one simple part of the solution

 

Gender diversity in tech companies has been a major issue for over two decades now. One part of solution to recruit more women in tech is a simple concept: more effective structured interviews.

The numbers don’t add up. The EEOC reports that women currently make up roughly 56% of the overall workforce, but are underrepresented in tech. Only about 28% of proprietary software jobs currently held by women.

Why is it important to have gender diversity in tech?

The financials tend to resonate more in enterprise companies. Various reports, including one from Catalyst and one from McKinsey, have shown that companies with more female leadership tend to outperform both their market and their rivals. An additional study, from the Peterson Institute for International Economics, showed companies with 30% or more females in leadership outperformed rivals by an average 6% net profit margin.

Women are often associated with being empathetic leaders. This is not true of all women of course, and many men are also empathetic. But if we can generally associated empathy with female leadership, we see a compelling reason to recruit more women in technology. Half of the ten most empathetic technology companies are also the fastest growing. They have grown about 23.3% per year, compared to a weighted average of 5.2% growth of all technology companies, according to one study.

Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter and named by RecruitingDaily as a top woman in HR technology worth watching, remarked: “While I know many men who are empathetic, including my husband, I’ve generally seen a higher degree of empathy from female leaders I’ve known and worked with. When you look at these 4x growth stats for companies led from a more empathetic place, and factor in the power of technology in terms of growing a company, having more females at the helm of these types of organizations seems both crucial and a no-brainer.”

Why is diversity in tech seemingly so far behind?

This is often framed as a “pipeline problem,” and that might be true. For example: according to Girls Who Code, 74% of young women (i.e. high-school aged and lower) express interest in STEM (technological) courses and career paths, but by the time decisions need to be made about taking those classes in college, only 18% choose STEM/computer science pathways. (And that’s actually dropped: in the 1980s, women held 37% of computer science degrees, for example.) 

What can be done about the technology gap for women? (more…)

Posted November 01, 2013 by

Leveraging Big Data Analytics: @ckapner123 at #truCollegeRecruiter

Minneapolis, MN – [November 1, 2013] – CollegeRecruiter.com, the leading niche job board for college students searching for internships and recent graduates hunting for entry-level jobs and other career opportunities, is pleased to announce that Cory Kapner of Recruitics will lead a discussion track on Recruitment Marketing Strategies: Leveraging Big Data Analytics at #truCollegeRecruiter New York City and that tickets are now available at www.truCollegeRecruiter.com for our fourth, fifth, and sixth recruiting events for hiring managers, recruiters, and other human resource leaders. (more…)

Posted July 31, 2013 by

Experienced in Data Analytics and IT Consulting? Recent Graduate Jobs May Be Available in the Future

In the future, there may be an opportunity to find recent graduate jobs for those with experience in data analytics and IT consulting.  Learn more in the following post.

Alan Radding, Big4.com guest blogger (A book is the best way to build a consulting practice, ask me about ghostwriting your book.) An article from McKinsey & Company, a leading management consulting and research firm, declares: “By 2018, the United States alone could face a shortage of 140,000 to 190,000 people with deep [data]

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Sorting Out the Data Analytics IT Options

Posted March 18, 2013 by

Do You Want “Mathemagical Superpowers?” Prepare for an Emerging Career in Data Analytics

Sharon Jones

Sharon Jones of Career Thought Leaders

The movie Moneyball showed Oakland Athletics’ use of performance data to recruit talented baseball players with good ROI. The new big thing is fanalytics, applied to a wide range of sports: basketball, hockey, motorsport, tennis, and more.

Bill Wilson (sports fan and recovering lawyer) wrote a blog about the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference:

Geeks Seek Reap From Tweeps in Seats (brewonsouthu@yahoo.com)

Doug Henschen, executive editor of InformationWeek, wrote that analytics are used in decision-making from “ticket and merchandise sales to labor agreements to player contracts, to TV and digital media deals.”

Computer modeling enabled meteorologists to give a heads-up warning to government agencies about Hurricane Sandy. The presidential and Senate race outcomes were accurately predicted by statistician Nate Silver and neuroscientist Sam Wang, respectively.

Healthcare providers seek data scientists at all levels to lower costs, improve patient care, provide pricing transparency, and enhance treatment decisions consistent with best practices.

“Data is the new oil.” (more…)

Posted June 05, 2012 by

Become an Irresistible Hire in Data Analytics, Development, and Design

Sharon Jones

Sharon Jones of Career Thought Leaders

A “war for talent” in social media has arisen due to critical skill shortages, according to Dr. John Sullivan, labeled the “Michael Jordan of Hiring” by Fast Company magazine.

Are you a problem solver who never quits until the challenge is met? Can you deal with chaos and ambiguity, unleashing creativity on demand? Can you spot new and emerging trends, acquire the combination of skills that few people possess, and become “The Rare Find” described by author George Anders? (more…)