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Posted July 19, 2016 by

5 ways juniors can take advantage of career services

It’s finally your junior year of college. You’re more than halfway finished with your undergraduate courses. Woohoo!

You can certainly breathe a sigh of relief and feel a sense of accomplishment, but you have some serious career-related tasks to accomplish this year. Most college students don’t simply land a great job after graduating. It’s a step-by-step process which requires you to do your part in collaboration with your career services office on campus. As Patricia Niemann, Career Development Consultant, puts it, “career development is the bridge that you will travel from your educational environment to future career opportunities.”

This short video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, lists six ways juniors in college can take advantage of career services to get ahead in the job search game.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Ensure that you’ve written a super solid resume and cover letter.

Now is the time to edit and update your resume with the help of your career services office on campus and to create a basic cover letter if you didn’t do so during your sophomore year. Career services will be glad to help you do this. Most career services offices even host special resume workshops and events, or you can set up a one-on-one resume appointment. No matter what approach you take, get it done. Don’t wait until the day before a job or internship interview. Creating or editing a resume takes time, even for a professional.

 

2. Gain work experience in your field of study.

It doesn’t matter if the experience is paid or unpaid. It doesn’t matter if you work five or 20 hours per week. It simply matters that you gain work experience in your field of study or as closely related to your field of study as possible. Are you majoring in criminal justice? Contact your local police department to ask about opportunities there. Is there a battered women’s shelter or sexual assault center in your area? Perhaps you could serve as a volunteer victim’s advocate. The possibilities are endless, but you have to take initiative. Working with career services is priceless. It’s the job of a career services professional to keep in touch with local employers and to serve as a liaison with organizations like these. Let your career services professionals work as advocates for you. Why do all the hard work yourself if you don’t have to? Don’t overlook sites like CollegeRecruiter.com, either. We can help. When you register, you tell us what you’re looking for, and we send you new job postings related only to your search criteria.

 

3. Up your networking game.

During your first and second years of college, it might have been enough to simply keep your social media sites clean of inappropriate content and to occasionally add new contacts. That’s not going to cut it your last two years of undergraduate study.

Start reaching out to alumni and chatting with employers via discussion boards online. Dedicate at least 30 minutes to these activities per week. Up your game online, and you’ll be surprised how many connections you’ll gain and what types of opportunities may surface as a result. Each time you attend an event with employers present, retain business cards and invite those employers (recruiters, hiring managers, and others) to connect with you on Twitter, LinkedIn, and other professional networking sites. If they don’t accept your invitations, don’t take it personally. If they do connect with you, send a personal message thanking them for adding you. Don’t harass employers online or send annoying messages, but don’t be afraid to like their posts or comment on content they share in a thoughtful and insightful manner.

 

4. Acquire better soft skills.

Ask career services professionals for opportunities to improve your soft skills. Seek feedback from your career services staff on where your strengths and weaknesses lie in terms of soft skills. Are you great at communicating in writing but poor at communicating face-to-face? You might need to practice interview questions with a career services member before conducting on-campus interviews with employers. Are you a strong leader but not so great at teamwork? Find ways to get involved in organizations requiring you to collaborate with others on campus.

 

5. Take grad school entrance practice exams.

If you plan on attending graduate school after you graduate from college, it’s a good idea to take practice exams for the GRE, MCAT, and other entrance exams for graduate schools during your junior year. Most of these are offered at no cost and can be found online. Career services offices often offer assistance in pointing students to these exams or to study guides on many campuses.

 

Lastly, and this is a bonus tip: don’t just attend the career fair your junior year of college.

The career fair is a great event—and a must—but challenge yourself to attend at least two other events sponsored by career services as well. Ask your career services office which events are most important on your campus. Is it the etiquette dinner, on-campus interviews, mock interviews, or other key events? Each campus has its own key events, so don’t assume you know which matter most without asking.

Want more help finding ways to guarantee career success? Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

 

Posted May 21, 2016 by

What kind of degrees can be pursued online?

Learn photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

The availability of online colleges has increased drastically even just over the last 10 years, and with that change, the degree offerings have also become more widespread. Today, students can find almost any degree level or major offered through an online institution. With a little effort and commitment, they can find a career path that works for them and take them where they want to go. So, consider all of the possibilities offered today when it comes to online degrees.

Certification levels

Previously, the certification levels provided through online colleges were limited, but today, students can find degrees at any level to meet their needs. Here’s an overview of certifications and degrees available at most colleges and universities.

•Certification: Many professional fields require ongoing certification to keep a license up-to-date. Fortunately, there are many certification program options, including those in medicine, education, counseling, and even business.

•Associate Degree: Two-year associate degree programs are a good choice for many career options, and online institutions typically offer a wide variety of programs at this level.

•Bachelor’s Degree: These four-year degrees are among the most popular online degree programs. Most online schools offer the widest variety of bachelor’s degree programs.

•Master’s Degree: These options used to be much less common, but students can now find online programs to obtain an MBA, MS, M.Ed., or MA.

•Doctoral Degree: This level of degree is still the rarest to be found on the internet; however, even doctorate degrees are increasingly offered online today. There are a variety of options ranging from business to education and even theology.

Majors

Many students believe they’ll be limited in their major choice if they choose to opt for an online program, but that simply isn’t the case. Online colleges offer a wide range of major options, including those in humanities, fine arts, business, finance, technology, science, health, medicine, education, and even law and criminal justice.

Specialized degrees

Today’s online colleges are even equipped to offer a wide range of specialized degree programs, such as a board certified behavior analyst program that can teach students to see the big picture. These degrees require specific preparation and advanced techniques that make them perfect candidates for an individualized online program. To pursue endorsement through a program like the behavior analyst certification, students are often required to complete specific prerequisites prior to applying for the program to ensure their success.

There are more online degree options available today than ever before. Online colleges offer programs at all different certification levels, as well as degree programs in various subjects. The possibilities are unlimited.

Are you thinking about going back to school? Find college majors with top entry-level jobs and go to our blog. Also, follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Rachelle Wilber, guest writer

Rachelle Wilber, guest writer

Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber; https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009221637700

Posted April 06, 2015 by

The Best Degrees that will Help you get a Job in the Government

Government search

Government search. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Federal, state and local governments are the largest employers in the country. Some people forego more money in the private sector for job security in the public sector. Most have a commitment to public service. Governmental entities hire many degreed individuals, many of whom do at least a portion of their studies online. Some of the best degrees for getting government jobs follow. (more…)

Posted March 26, 2015 by

4 Graduate Degrees to Help You Make a Difference

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

Although college is often thought of as a way to make one more desirable on the job market, increasing one’s credentials doesn’t have to mean forsaking public service entirely. There are many career paths that are both lucrative and socially beneficial. Of course, higher credentials are often the key to both better jobs and more meaningful work. Here are four degrees you can pursue after your Bachelor’s that will let you make a difference in your community. (more…)

Posted March 13, 2015 by

Considering A Career As A Criminal Lawyer

Lawyer and judge speaking next to the criminal in handcuffs in the court room

Lawyer and judge speaking next to the criminal in handcuffs in the court room. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Criminal lawyers defend individuals, organizations, and entities that have been accused and charged with a crime. These attorneys handle a diverse array of criminal cases, ranging from violent crimes to drug crimes and corporate crimes. Like all other lawyers, criminal lawyers must obtain the necessary degrees and certification wherever they intend to practice. (more…)

Posted December 02, 2013 by

Want to Work in Criminal Justice? 7 Entry Level Jobs to Consider

Are you pursuing or already have a criminal justice degree?  What kind of position would you like to have in the field?  The following post has seven entry level jobs you might be interested in.

If you’re trying to get started in criminal justice, consider one of these great entry level criminal justice jobs!

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Posted November 21, 2013 by

Recent Graduate Jobs You Can Pursue with a Criminal Justice Degree

Have you graduated with a criminal justice degree and wonder what recent graduate jobs are available?  The following post has some career opportunities to consider.

This is a guest post contributed by Pamela Rosssow Criminal justice is a broad field with many careers to choose from. Careers that fall under the criminal justice umbrella are police officer, paralegals, corrections officer, court clerk, probation officer, private investigator, sheriff, or a criminologist. You can also join several federal agencies like the CIA,

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Posted August 28, 2013 by

7 Entry Level Jobs that Pay Well

Recent college graduates, have you found a job yet?  If not, the following post includes seven entry level jobs that might interest you, and pay well.

You better check out the high paying entry level jobs listed below before you start flipping hamburgers. They have promising starting salaries and they also lead to good opportunities for advancement.

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Posted October 07, 2006 by

Entry-Level Jobs In Criminal Justice Exude Diversity

It is so refreshing to find out that job categories don’t have to be limiting. Although you are interested in an entry-level criminal justice job, you can engage in a lot of different activities all under the criminal justice umbrella. Diversity is the key to happiness and enjoyment in the workplace. Just as a hint: you don’t have to have an interest in entry-level criminal justice jobs to have it.
However, since we are talking about entry-level criminal justice jobs, we will want to look at “employment mega links in criminal justice,” this site has great resources for entry-level job seekers. There is a job title page (you can be a psychologist, an arson investigator, even a forensic scientist), a link to the occupational outlook (provided by the Department of Labor), a how to get a job in criminal justice page, additional tips and tricks and even how to apply for criminal justice jobs on the internet. Jobs are listed by job type as well, with all necessary supporting links, and you can search for entry-level criminal justice job opportunities by state.
This could truly be your last stop in your entry-level criminal justice job search but just in case (as always) I list some other sites that may be worth your while. So have fun, learn new things and find that entry-level job!!
Starting Point:
http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/employ.htm
Other Resources:
http://www.directdegree.com/s/CriminalJusticeCareers.shtml
http://arapaho.nsuok.edu/~dreveskr/CCCR.html-ssi
http://www.uncwil.edu/stuaff/career/Majors/criminal.htm
http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/crimjust/jobs.htm
http://www.rrcc.edu/criminal/
http://www.asu.edu/studentaffairs/career/Students/ChoosingAMajor/html/criminaljust.htm