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Posted March 12, 2016 by

Preparing introverts and extroverts for the job search

Extrovert or introvert as a choice of different belief courtesy of Shutterstock.com

kentoh/Shutterstock.com

Introverts and extroverts handle things in very different ways. School counselors’ job is to help all of their students, and one of the best ways to do this is to know how introverts and extroverts prefer to do things. When preparing them to leave college and enter the job market, there are several things a counselor can do that will help tailor students’ paths with their personalities.

Discover which they are

Before school counselors begin counseling students based on their personalities, they have to determine if students are introverts or extroverts. Unless counselors have a longstanding and personal connection with students, it is probably a good idea to give them some tests to help determine their personality style. Tests — such as this one from Psychology Today — will help determine whether students are introverts or extroverts. Often students themselves are not aware of their own styles, and doing the test will be beneficial to both students and counselors.

Inform students how their personalities can impact their jobs

Many people do not know the difference between introverts and extroverts, and they often don’t know which category they fall into. Once school counselors have determined which one students are through some tests, they can begin telling students about what it means. Explain to students how extroverts and introverts may tackle different scenarios, and how they prefer to do things.

Choose the right application method

Now that both counselors and students understand the latter’s personality type, they can begin tailoring the application process for when they are looking for jobs. For example, counselors can tell extroverts that face-to-face interviews are better for them, since they are more outgoing, while introverts may be better at cover letters and resumes.

However, some application types cannot be avoided; in this case, counselors should help students improve on things that are not necessarily their strengths. For example, here are some ways that introverts can prepare for interviews.

In addition, school counselors can steer them towards jobs more suited to their personalities. As an example, an introvert may not be best suited for a sales position job, or one requiring a lot of group work. On the other hand, an extrovert is probably not suited for a job requiring them to work long hours alone.

College sports male volleyball finals in Milan courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Paolo Bona/Shutterstock.com

Suggest outside activities

Since a lot of college students do not have work experience they can add to their resumes, outside activities can help bolster them. Give students some options for things they can get involved with that will be suited for their personality types, along with their interests. The more activities they can get involved with, the better their resumes will look.

Encourage them to explore outside their style

While it is a good idea for students to play to their strengths, that does not mean they should avoid anything that makes them uncomfortable. School counselors should encourage students to keep an open mind, and to try some things not necessarily suited to their personality types. At some point along their career paths, students are probably going to do something outside their normal comfort zones, and by expanding their horizons now, they will be better equipped to handle it in the future.

Hopefully this short list will help school counselors tailor the counseling of their students. Helping students realize what their strengths are and how they can utilize them is a great tool for after they graduate and will help guide them for years to come.

Need more tips for your job search? Learn more at College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Tony Newton

Tony Newton, guest writer

Tony Newton is a contributing author for @DailyKos and @NationOfChange His favorite subjects are social awareness campaigns and public policy in pedagogy.

Posted January 20, 2015 by

How to Be a Strategic Career Explorer

Mark Skoskiewicz

Mark Skoskiewicz, Founder of MyGuru

Whether you’re concerned with success in high school, college, a job search, or a specific career, it turns out that who you are (your background, skills, talents, etc.) is actually less important than what you do (the strategies you follow, plans you put in place, and effort you expend). Most people don’t necessarily find this intuitively true, but lots of research has been done to back up the point.

Here’s the main point of this article. You need to manage your academic life and professional career like a CEO manages a business: by researching, developing, and implementing strategies. (more…)

Posted April 08, 2014 by

Not every medical career needs math!

Female counselor ready to take notes

Female counselor ready to take notes. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Jobs in healthcare are predicted to keep growing over the next 20 years. People who are looking to start a new career know that field of medicine is wide open but many pass up a career in medicine because they think it is beyond their reach. Why? Well, it’s because we think of a pre-med major in college and immediately conjure up images of a geeky looking kid that can memorize and do math. Most people don’t see themselves as “smart” in that way. The point I want to make is that we associate medicine with mathematics but the truth is entirely different. In reality, there are many medical careers that don’t require math and if you’re looking to start a new career, give the healthcare industry some consideration. Think over this: (more…)

Posted January 16, 2014 by

Internship Finder, Here Are 9 Places You May Not Have Thought to Find These Positions

If you’re an internship finder searching for an opportunity, the following post shares nine places you may not have thought about finding these positions.

When you’re looking for internships, there are some pretty basic search methods everyone knows. There are big job boards like Internships.com, Glassdoor, and Indeed.com that list hundreds of internships all around the world. The problem with big sites like these is that everyone uses them, so the positions

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Posted April 30, 2013 by

Career in Counseling

Are you interested in counseling as a career?  If so, the following post has more information about some entry level job opportunities in the field.

According to the American Counseling Association: What does the counseling profession entail?Professional Counselors are graduate level (either master’s or doctoral degree) mental health service providers, trained to work with individuals, families, and groups in treating mental, behavioral, and emotional problems and disorders. A Professional Counselor will possess a master’s or doctoral degree in one

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Career in Counseling