ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 20, 2018 by

A data-driven university selection approach: You can too!

 

At Micron Technology, Dmitry Zhmurkin uses a fantastic method for basing their university relations decisions on data. Zhmurkin is their University Relations Program Manager, and his method helps them decide whether to visit a campus and work with career services, or whether to recruit virtually. College Recruiter’s president and founder Steven Rothberg recently spoke with him about his methodology and said that Zhmurkin “just greatly improved the college recruiting practices at probably dozens, maybe hundreds of organizations.”

Want to know the secret formula? Below we summarize Zhmurkin’s presentation, including a description of his methodology. (more…)

Posted March 19, 2018 by

Redefining the role of the college and university relations recruiter

Recruiting and advertising for open positions has changed. Before industrialization, virtually every place of employment was a solo or small operation. Without power, it was difficult to scale anything. All of a sudden with electricity, you could have factories with production lines. Employers needed to quickly go from having a couple people working in their facility to maybe even hundreds or thousands.

Advertising for jobs nowadays is mostly done through social media, networking, and employee referrals. When you only need to hire a few people, chances are you already know them. In that case, no advertising is needed. Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, explains that if you now have to suddenly start hiring dozens, hundreds or thousands, it’s very unlikely that you’re going to know enough people to fill those positions. Rothberg recently presented “Redefining the Role of the College and University Relations Recruiter,” and we share his takeaways here.   (more…)

Posted March 07, 2018 by

How to measure the quality of new hires

focus on quality of hireOver the past couple of years, we’ve seen a huge shift in thought amongst our Fortune 1,000 company and federal government agency customers regarding how they measure the quality of their new hires. Until a few years ago, talent acquisition in these organizations hardly measured the quality of hire at all and often not at all. Their focus, if they were data-oriented, was on cost-per-hire.
Today, there’s a shift to looking at productivity and that almost always includes longevity as a key component. If someone is only with you for a year or two, it will be hard for them to be as productive over their career with your organization as someone who is with you for five to ten years. The result? More and more large employers are placing greater and greater emphasis on hiring candidates who on paper may not be as sexy as others, but who are more likely to stay for far longer than those who attended fancier schools.
Posted September 25, 2017 by

HR metrics: Surprising truth about reducing cost-per-hire

 

Do you take all costs into account when you measure cost-per-hire? That is, staff time, travel costs, etc. If you do, Steven Rothberg is guessing that you’ll notice something about on campus recruiting versus online recruiting. Rothberg is the president and founder of College Recruiter and has both depth and a breadth of knowledge of employers’ HR metrics, and how they tend to use cost-per-hire, as well as how smart employers reduce it.

Think cost-per-hire is the best way to measure the performance of your recruiting team? Think again. Read Steven Rothberg’s insight below about the best key performance metric, and more. (more…)

Posted April 22, 2016 by

TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo: Doing better deals

The Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions (TATech) will host a fall conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, on September 19-21, 2016. Peter Weddle, CEO of TATech, is excited to announce the conference and share information about the conference’s scope, purpose, and agenda with viewers in this video hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager of College Recruiter. Bethany interviews Peter and Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, who will present a session for talent acquisition leaders at the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo.


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Peter Weddle explains that TATech is the global trade association for the talent acquisition solutions industry. It represents the for-profit enterprises and not-for-profit organizations that provide technology-based products and services for talent acquisition professionals, from applicant tracking system companies, job boards, and social media sites to mobile apps, recruitment advertising agencies, and cloud-based recruitment marketing platforms. Collectively, its members power or operate over 60,000 sites worldwide and provide state-of-the-art solutions services for virtually every facet of talent acquisition.

The purpose of the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo is to provide cross-talk and information sharing between recruiters/talent acquisition professionals and vendors who provide products and services for talent acquisition professionals. Peter Weddle believes there is a lack of communication and interaction between these two groups of professionals, and that enabling employers and recruiters to get the information they need from their vendors will help them improve their return on investment.

Steven Rothberg, President of College Recruiter, hopes to help talent acquisition leaders improve their return on investment when working with vendors, too, and that is the scope of his presentation entitled, “Doing better deals: How to be a smart consumer of talent acquisition solutions.” In the past, many employers simply posted jobs and assumed the risk; either the jobs would perform well or not. However, with the solutions available to employers now via technology, employers should do their homework and understand the estimated return on investment associated with various types of advertising (banner advertising, email campaigns, pay per click, etc.).

Steven will cover this information in his presentation and believes it will empower talent acquisition professionals to make informed decisions regarding their college recruiting budgets. It will also help employers to negotiate better deals and to make cost comparisons between proposals from different vendors. He emphasizes that employers should negotiate with vendors and provide justification using metrics and pricing information using this type of cost comparison information.

Peter Weddle emphasizes the value of attending a conference like the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo; there isn’t always an opportunity to visit face-to-face with owners of organizations like College Recruiter. In addition, TATech is offering free hotel accommodations at The Palms to those who register for the conference by June 15, 2016. Lastly, Peter mentions that the conference is truly a fun experience, featuring the 2016 Recruiting Service Innovation Awards (the ReSIs). Modeled after the Oscars, the awards are a red carpet, black tie optional celebration.

Be sure to follow our blog for more information about upcoming conferences and events for recruiters and talent acquisition professionals. Subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

 

 

Posted March 31, 2016 by

College recruiting ROI

When considering return on investment (ROI) in college recruiting, it’s best to look beyond short-term measures and to consider long-term distal measures. Talent acquisition leaders must really look at the big picture; they can’t lose the vision of the forest for the trees.

This series of four videos, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadiou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

 


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This series is one set of videos in a larger series featuring WPG experts posted on College Recruiter’s YouTube channel highlighting best practices and a timeline for developing a college recruitment program.

What are the best ways to determine the return on investment in college recruiting? Is it cost per hire? Recruitment cost ratio? Number of hires made? Retention of employees? Number of job offers to acceptances?

There are multiple factors to consider; ultimately, it comes back to “I spent a certain amount of money to achieve a certain result. So where did I start with college recruiting? Why did I start this in the beginning? Am I achieving what I set out to achieve?”

This brings recruiters back to their objectives. If objectives are big-picture oriented, recruiters will want to use distal measures when determining the effectiveness of their college recruiting programs, not just cost measures or efficiency measures based on the current calendar year.

In the next video, WPG experts share a powerful real example of determining the ROI of college recruiting.


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If you spent $5000 to hire a student from a particular university, and that hired individual made a great discovery which added value to your organization, you would probably agree that the $5000 individual was a better investment than many other individuals you hired who cost your college recruiting program much less.

Thus, return on investment is a broad concept which encompasses much more than ratios and efficiency measures. Recruiters should thoroughly examine their objectives for their college recruitment programs. It’s not just about short-term costs.

The third video discusses the importance of considering both efficiency and effectiveness when determining the ROI of college recruitment programs.


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Efficiency is measured by short-term standards; it can be measured by ratios. How many resumes did I obtain from the university? How many candidates were interviewed? How many did we hire? Efficiency measures help recruiters determine whether to adjust the recruiting process or not.

When considering effectiveness, you’re finished with proximal data and are ready to look at distal data and long-term measures. Most HR and recruiting professionals lack patience when it comes to measuring effectiveness. However, sometimes waiting to monitor effectiveness is very important. Defining clear objectives on the front end is crucial, and deciding how to measure and track your objectives at the beginning is just as important. If you don’t, you will not wind up gathering reliable data.

The WorkPlace Group also features an article on its website entitled “Backwards is Forwards” with more information about the ROI of college recruiting.

The final video in this series provides recruiters with final tips related to measuring ROI in college recruiting.


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WPG experts recommend checking out The National Association for Colleges and Employers (NACE) website; it has some tools for assisting employers with measuring the effectiveness of their college recruiting programs.

As time goes on, employers learn that students who excel when hired are not the students they might have expected to excel. As time goes on, data provides expectations wrong. This is one reason it’s important to follow data and use it in the planning process. Study the data and measure long-term effectiveness (distal data). This will improve your college recruiting program and overall effectiveness.

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

 

Posted March 20, 2016 by

[video] The average cost-per-hire for on-campus recruiting is $3,582

Money saved for college with a small graduation cap

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Despite conventional wisdom, the vast majority of the students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities do not find their internships and entry-level jobs through their career service offices. The number of schools with well staffed and funded career service offices is, by many accounts, in the dozens yet there are over 7,400 post-secondary schools nationwide. Students at big, well funded, schools with strong brands amongst the largest employers of students can and often do find their jobs through their career service offices, but they’re the exception.

From the perspective of the employer, it is also worth noting that college recruiting isn’t nearly as expensive for the vast majority of hires as it would be if all of those students and grads were hired through on-campus recruiting. A recent study by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) indicated that the AVERAGE cost-per-hire of recruiting a student through on-campus recruiting is now $3,582 when employers properly account for all of their related costs such as the costs for their college relations / recruitment office, pre-recruiting activities, recruiting trips, company visits, hiring costs, relocation, and advertising. Ouch. That cost is even higher for elite students in elite majors at elite schools. Double ouch. (more…)

Posted March 03, 2016 by

NACE 2016: Benchmarks in college recruiting

At the 2016 National Association of Colleges and Employers Conference & Expo June 7-10 in Chicago, College Recruiter’s President and Founder Steven Rothberg will present a session for employers entitled “How to Benchmark Your University Relations Program in the Absence of Benchmarks.”

In this brief video hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, Rothberg explains why clear benchmarks in college recruiting do not often exist and helps define some potential solutions to this problem.


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Rothberg mentions that in the field of college recruiting, until recently, very few college recruiting programs had benchmarks. As a result, many college recruiting programs did not know if they were operating effectively. Some college recruiting programs are beginning to share their operations data and establish benchmarks, but there is still a lack of continuity across the industry.

For example, not all organizations define cost per hire the same way. If a recruiter travels, and the company does not factor in all travel costs and salary costs, as well as fees charged by the university, then the cost per hire estimate is inaccurate. Failure to accurately estimate costs affects overall budget estimates.

It’s also important to use benchmarks accurately in order to measure success in college recruiting and to give credit where credit is due. Rothberg cites his work with a client recently who was able to pinpoint the exact number of candidates who’d been hired as a result of working with the college recruiting team.

Benchmarking is not just about measuring your own success, Rothberg notes, but also about comparing your achievements to those of others in the field whose organizations are similar to yours and who are hiring similar types of candidates. Cooperating with other employers by sharing benchmarking data can help you reach goals. This is what Rothberg’s session at the 2016 NACE Conference & Expo will focus on.

Don’t forget to register for the 2016 NACE Conference & Expo. Follow College Recruiter’s blog for more information about best practices in college recruiting, and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. We are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to excellent entry-level jobs and internships. Why not let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process?

Posted March 02, 2016 by

SHRM 2016: Metrics don’t lie

At the 2016 SHRM Talent Management Conference and Exposition  April 18-20, Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, will present to recruiters, talent acquisition leaders, and human resource managers. The title of his presentation is “Metrics don’t lie, but is your staff lying about its metrics?”

In this 7-minute video hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, Rothberg provides an overview of his upcoming presentation as well as clarification on why metrics matter.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

 

Before talent acquisition leaders begin using metrics to measure their success in college recruiting programs, they must first define measurable objectives. Rothberg mentions that this is one of the problems in college recruiting. Rothberg states that most talent acquisition leaders, particularly in college recruiting programs, did not use metrics or data to measure their success until recently.

Generic data points, like average cost per hire, assist in measuring effectiveness. However, putting those metrics into context is even more helpful. If your organization’s cost per hire is really low, Rothberg states, then you probably have a pretty effective operation. If your organization’s cost per hire is $10,000, and other organizations similar to you are hiring at $5,000, that may be a red flag.

Rothberg is particularly excited about presenting at the 2016 SHRM Talent Management Conference and Exposition because the event is always full of positive energy, with attendees genuinely motivated to grow and become better, regardless of their job title or position within their organizations. For this reason, Rothberg is including information in his presentation about how talent acquisition professionals can get a seat at the table by using predictive analytics. Talent acquisition professionals can use predictive analytics to discuss potential problems and to offer solutions. For example, labor market shortages  and impending increases in benefit costs might be discussed using predictive analytics, and proposals about ways to deal with those changes might be made.

Be sure to register for the 2016 SHRM Talent Management Conference and Exposition.

Follow our blog for more tips about using metrics in your college recruiting program, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. We are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to excellent entry-level jobs and internships. Why not let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process?

Posted December 05, 2014 by

Use Data to Drive Your Recruiting Decisions

Close-up of a touchscreen with financial data in form of charts and diagrams

Close-up of a touchscreen with financial data in form of charts and diagrams. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

You may find this surprising – but 74% of talent acquisition leaders say that their organizations do a poor job of using metrics in their recruiting process.

Why? Some of it is lack of time – but a good portion simply don’t know what numbers are available and what can be done with them.  But sometimes even when you know what numbers you want, you’re charged more money by your ATS or job board “partner” for access to your own numbers.  At College Recruiter, we think that’s wrong.  In fact, we automatically provide detailed reports every month for job postings and every targeted banner ad and targeted email campaign so that our clients know how many candidates saw the ads (branding) and how many of those clicked through to the employer’s web site to apply. (more…)