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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 10, 2016 by

LinkedIn tip #4: Contact information

To share or not to share contact information on LinkedIn?

This video and article will answer that question.

Whether you’re a new LinkedIn user or a pro, expert Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College and award-winning social media consultant, will help you improve your LinkedIn profile. This short video and article is part 4 in a 10-part series, Top 10 LinkedIn tips with Chaim Shapiro, for college students, recent graduates, and job seekers who want to improve their LinkedIn profiles while searching for jobs and networking online.

This video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager Bethany Wallace, provides an overview of options for sharing various pieces of personal contact information on LinkedIn.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Shapiro emphasizes the importance of providing basic contact information on LinkedIn when job searching and networking online. For example, job seekers might want to provide their email addresses or even phone numbers but not their mailing addresses for privacy purposes. Shapiro also encourages job seekers to share links to other websites, including personal websites and Twitter accounts, to maximize social networking opportunities and business opportunities.

Shapiro believes it’s a good idea to include adequate contact information. Contact information is visible to your connections and is viewable in your summary on LinkedIn (which can be included on your public profile). If recruiters and talent acquisition professionals search for you on LinkedIn, they can easily contact you without having to pay to send you an InMail message through LinkedIn if your email address or other contact information is viewable and readily available on LinkedIn.

For more of Chaim Shapiro’s top 10 LinkedIn tips, subscribe to College Recruiter’s YouTube channel, follow College Recruiter’s blog, and follow College Recruiter on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Chaim Shapiro, M.Ed. is the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant specializing in LinkedIn. He has presented his popular LinkedIn Workshop at National Conferences, Universities, Public Libraries and for communal organizations across the country. Chaim earned a Master’s Degree in College Student Personnel from Loyola University, Chicago, and also studied in the Institutional Leadership and Policy Studies Ph.D. program at the University of California, Riverside Graduate School of Education. He has more than 12 years of experience working in college administration.

Posted March 04, 2016 by

Top 10 LinkedIn tips

Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College & award-winning social media consultant

Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College & award-winning social  media consultant specializing in LinkedIn

 

Whether you’re a novice LinkedIn user or a pro, it never hurts to learn more about how to better utilize LinkedIn to network online, particularly while conducting a job search. Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College and award-winning social media consultant, public speaker, and freelance writer, offers the College Recruiter audience his top 10 LinkedIn tips over the next two weeks in a series of short YouTube videos hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace.

College students, recent graduates, and other job seekers will benefit from the easy-to-follow tips Shapiro offers in his videos. Shapiro discusses the following topics:

1. Introduction to LinkedIn profiles and background photo selection

2. Name, profile photo, and headline

3. Vanity URL and public profile settings

4. Contact information on LinkedIn

5. Rich media content

6. Skills and endorsements

7. Alumni feature

8. Advanced search feature

9. Contact relationship management

10. How to search connections

Stay tuned over the next two weeks as we post one tip per day on our blog and YouTube. Each video is only 2-4 minutes long and provides you with easy-to-implement tips to improve your online networking and job searching strategies.

Follow College Recruiter’s blog for links to Chaim’s top 10 LinkedIn tip videos and accompanying articles and follow us on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Chaim Shapiro, M.Ed. is the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant specializing in LinkedIn. He has presented his popular LinkedIn Workshop at National Conferences, Universities, Public Libraries and for communal organizations across the country. Chaim earned a Master’s Degree in College Student Personnel from Loyola University, Chicago, and also studied in the Institutional Leadership and Policy Studies Ph.D. program at the University of California, Riverside Graduate School of Education. He has more than 12 years of experience working in college administration.

 

Posted February 02, 2016 by

Creating a reference page for your resume

The job search involves multiple steps. One of the first steps involved is creating a reference page. The step prior to this is writing a basic resume. You will edit, tailor, and tweak your resume each time you apply for specific positions. Next you’ll want to create a separate reference page.

How do you select people to serve as references? How do you create and maintain a reference page?

Check out College Recruiter’s four-minute video about creating a reference page for your resume.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Create a separate reference page

Be sure to indicate to potential employers who will review your resume that you have a reference page available. At the bottom of your resume, type “references available upon request.” Creating a separate reference page is helpful for a few reasons. It saves space on your resume, and when employers choose to pursue you further in the hiring process and want to check references, they must contact you to obtain a copy of your references. This allows you time to quickly call or email your references; your references are then better prepared to provide positive, clear answers about your qualifications for employment.

Type your reference page using the same font and format as your resume; you want to ensure that employers easily recognize that your reference page matches up with your resume if the two pages become separated. For this reason, you’ll also want to include the same or similar header at the top of your reference page listing your contact information (name, address, phone number, and email address).

2. Ask first

Always ask people before listing them as references; when people are prepared for reference checks, they can provide glowing reviews of you without feeling flustered. They are also more likely to serve as a reference in the future if you treat them with courtesy and respect by asking for permission to list them as references on the front end.

3. Hesitation means no

If people hesitate to say yes when you ask for permission to list them as references, do not list them as references, even if they eventually give you permission. There’s some reason for their hesitation. You don’t want to take any chances on one of your references giving you anything less than a stellar review; there are many times when employers checking references pick up on tone of voice or implied hints dropped by references over the phone or even in emails. Don’t let one bad reference check cause you to miss out on a great job opportunity. Move on and ask someone else to serve as a reference for you.

4. Go above and beyond

Employee Reference Check Form courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Sinseeho/Shutterstock.com

Try to provide more than the minimum number of references required. Most employers request at least three references; list five to seven instead. When human resources professionals, hiring managers, or recruiters check your references and need quick responses, this provides them with more than enough people to call or email, and if they don’t hear back from the first three people on the list, they can call one or two of your other references instead.

5. Provide variety

When selecting your references, provide potential employers with variety. Think about offering recruiters a broad overview of your qualifications, including your work history, educational background, and volunteer and extracurricular involvement. Include references like coworkers, supervisors, former professors, students you partnered with on major projects, fellow volunteers, directors of non-profit organizations who managed fundraisers you participated in, etc. The longer the relationship you’ve had with your references, the better; one of the questions employers might ask of your references is how long they have known you.

6. Clear communicators

Select references who will not only speak highly of you but who will also speak clearly and concisely about you, and preferably in an upbeat manner. Your favorite former college professor might be the nicest guy in the world, but if he’s extremely soft-spoken and stammers most of the time, you might consider finding another former professor to ask to serve as a reference. Remember that about 80% of employers check references, with about 16% checking references prior to the interview. Be sure you select references who will serve as cheerleaders for you prior to your arrival at the interview.

7. Titles don’t always impress

Avoid listing references simply because their job titles look impressive on your reference page; instead think about what your references will have to say about you. Can they provide real, concrete examples about the ways you’ve demonstrated your skills and abilities? If not, why are you listing them on your reference page? Remember that recruiters and hiring managers want to know if you’re a good fit for the open position. If your references can’t provide information to reassure employers that you’re the best candidate for the job opening, find references who can. Be sure your references know the real you.

8. Maintain and update

Keep your reference page updated with current contact information. Don’t make it tough on employers to check your references; they might give up if they run into snags when checking your references and move on to the next candidate in line for the job.

9. Say thanks

Lastly, be sure to thank your references each time you obtain an interview or land a job. You never know the difference your references’ reviews can make in your job search. Your references serve as part of your network of supporters, and maintaining positive connections with your network always pays off.

For more Tuesday Tips and job search secrets, follow College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

 

Posted May 13, 2015 by

How To Write Crisp, Clean, Clutter-free Cover Letters!

Jimmy Sweeney

Jimmy Sweeney, President of CareerJimmy

There’s nothing quite like a crisp, clean, clutter-free dress shirt or blouse. It makes a statement about the person wearing it. And the same is true for a job search cover letter. Include your experience and skills in as few words as possible and then ask for an interview for the job you want. The hiring manager will remember you because your cover letter will have made a statement about you as a person. (more…)

Posted April 16, 2015 by

Own the Room at Your Next Networking Event as a Student, Intern and Recent Graduate

Networking Event words on a wall calendar to remind you of the day or date for a business meeting, celebration, conference or seminar

Networking Event words on a wall calendar to remind you of the day or date for a business meeting, celebration, conference or seminar. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

We live in a busy world, and college students are no exception. Today’s young adults have hectic schedules and are often times running between classes, work, extracurricular activities and social time with friends. It may seem tough to fit one more thing into this schedule, however, it is important to make time for networking as well. Networking will help you to gain experience now and will be beneficial in the long run for your career. As a student, intern or recent graduate, it can be intimidating to stand in a room full of unfamiliar faces that have more professional experience than you do. Here are a few quick tips to help you own the room and stand out like a pro at your next networking event. (more…)

Posted January 21, 2015 by

Resume Etiquette for Today’s Job Seekers

An HR manager scans through dozens of resumes on a routine basis, and can tell an unprofessional candidate for a job right from a glance at his/her resume. Why bear the brunt of an imperfect resume when you can follow simple guidelines to make yours stand out? Include relevant keywords for your job, whether it’s about touting you prowess as a team leader, a problem solver, or a dependable team building resource. Be careful about formatting your resume smartly; provide succinct contact information, use readable and classy fonts, make the content 100% relevant for the job, and avoid any flashy graphics or colors. Then, trust bullets to communicate more about your achievements, but limit their usage. Avoid clichés and jargon, and compile a coherent resume. (more…)