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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 02, 2019 by

How to Use Your Disability as a Strength When Applying for a Job

Lois Barth is a Human Development Expert, Speaker, Life and Business Coach, and Author of the book, “Courage to SPARKLE; The Audacious Girls’ Guide to Creating A Life that Lights You Up.” Lois will be a panelist at the College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY on December 12th in New York City.

Did you know that bones that were broken and healed properly are stronger than bones that have never been broken at all? It’s a fact, as well as a great metaphor for those with disabilities. As a life and business coach, I often tell my clients to use that fact in an interview, not harping on the disability, but being strategic in sending the message that adapting to, and in some cases, overcoming a disability, makes them a far stronger candidate than someone who has never gone through adversity.

There are, in fact, many ways to turn a disability into a desired ability when applying for a job. Of course, it all depends on the type of disability, the position and the company culture.

Start with Some Research

There are many factors to consider about a company before applying for a job. I guide my career-coaching clients who are getting ready for an interview to think of themselves as an investigator out to solve a mystery. Begin the process by looking at the company on a broad-stroke level. What does the website tell you about the organization? You can learn a lot about the culture from the messaging, the use of buzz words (such as diversity, inclusion, team engagement), company values, charitable contributions, community involvement and recent initiatives. Additionally, pay attention to the images: Do they include photos of employees who are diverse? Do the images reflect a company that is more conservative, or one that is more progressive?

You can also Google them to discover any current or past newsworthy trends in both their industry and their organization that may impact hiring. For instance, if they just received a “Best Places to Work” award, it’s likely that their culture is positive and inclusive. On the other hand, if you find a backlash for recent marginalizing of a group, you may want to steer clear. Review sites like Glass Door can be tricky because it’s usually the employees who have extreme experiences (they either love it or hate it) that take the time to write, which means you’re not getting the full picture. You may, however, notice themes among the reviews.

Once you get a company overview, take a deeper dive into the job description. What are the primary functions? Whom are you serving? What core competencies are they looking for and is your disability an asset (it often is) or a deficit? How do you spin it to either show how your disability will make you a better candidate or at the very least, won’t hinder your performance?

Use Story-Selling to Make Your Pitch

Recently I worked with a client whose disability was fairly obvious from the get-go, but given his non-profit focus, it was an asset, because he had overcome so much to get where he is and the job that he was interviewing for was serving an underserved and neglected population. I strongly suggested that he lead with his “story-selling pitch” which was a wonderfully touching story about learning to deal with his disability, and how, in the process, he learned so much about empathy, persistence, critical thinking, and determination, all of which were desired qualities for this position. Within the story, we weaved in his hard skills that embodied a whole slew of accomplishments that were germane to the position. The interviewer became intrigued and after several interviews with board members, he was offered the job.

If your disability is blatantly obvious and may be perceived as a deficit, but nobody’s talking about it, using a well-crafted story that highlights the key qualities the employer is looking for can be very impactful. Many job descriptions list qualities such as critical thinking, determination, adaptability, and self-starter, to name just a few, that people who have successfully navigated their disability have had to develop.

However, if your disability may bring to question functionality and the ability to perform a job, then that needs to be addressed head-on. It’s best to do this in a fluid, conversational tone, using examples from the past to dispel any concerns a potential employer may have.

As a rule, I suggest candidates do more listening than talking. Ask thoughtful questions and focus on being interested versus interesting, which works for people with or without disabilities! Don’t play the disability card, but don’t try to avoid it either. Rapt attention, genuine interest, enthusiasm and energy are rare these days, which means demonstrating these qualities will take you far. Of course, you also need the hard skills to back up your competency.

Finally, don’t be afraid to bring humor to the situation. When appropriately stated, humor can go a long way to dispel any tension that may be present. It shows that you are not overly sensitive, that you have a sense of humor and humility, but you’re not ashamed of your disability. In general, people hire people they like; people whom they can relate to and trust, regardless of a disability.  

Know Your Strengths 

One of my colleagues had very intense dyslexia and ADHD. She couldn’t sit still for more than 20-30 minutes, and paperwork that should have taken 10-20 minutes took hours and was tortuous. On the positive side, she was amazing with people, could pivot on a dime, had tons of energy and loved making people feel special. She was also hilarious, passionate about health and loved helping people.

Fortunately, the health club where she was working saw her strengths and was smart enough to move her from a stifling mid-level administrative position to a sales job where she could meet and greet clients. Her people skills, creativity and natural curiosity about others, made her very good at this position and, in turn, the position made her very happy. Within the first month, she became head of sales.

Before you begin applying for positions, take a realistic assessment of your strengths: What do you bring to the potential employer? Do your abilities mesh with the job description and the qualities they value? Again, be sure to do your research on the industries, companies and jobs that provide a good fit with your unique assets.

For instance, if someone has ADD, a job that demands constant switching of tasks or mostly short-term projects takes advantage of this person’s proclivities. Meanwhile, someone with OCD may excel at a job that requires being very precise and detail oriented. For people who don’t pick up social cues and operate at their best by themselves, a strong analytic research job that requires long hours of solitary focused work may be a perfect fit. In other words, depending on the job, “alleged disabilities” may be a huge benefit.

Do Your Research. Lead with Enthusiasm. Make it About What You Can Provide.

Those are the three main takeaways when applying for any job. Remember, you may have a disability, but you are much more than your disability. You’re a whole person, with skill sets and talents that are valuable to the right employers. With every disability, there is another ability that has gotten strengthened to compensate. That’s why, even though it’s become quite PC, I do like the phrase “learning differences.” We all have challenges and we all have assets. Nobody’s exempt from the human being club that’s full of complexity and diversity. The more you embrace it as just one of the many facets of your humanity, the more you can celebrate (and sell) the one-of-a-kind gem that you are.

Lois Barth is a Human Development Expert, Speaker, Life and Business Coach, and Author of the book, “Courage to SPARKLE; The Audacious Girls’ Guide to Creating A Life that Lights You Up.” Lois supports her clients to overcome their negative self-talk, manage stress and advocate for themselves and dynamically create the next chapter of their life. She has worked with over 800 clients and on a professional level has helped them in every area from career transition, interview skills training, communication and building their business. The creator of Smart Sexy TV, she has been the makeover life coach for SELF Magazine; Fitness Magazine and Fit Blog (Sears) as well as the “Stress Less–Thrive More” Lady for C.T. Style TV (ABC Affiliate). A sought after expert, Lois has been quoted and published in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, College Recruiter, SELF Magazine, to name a few.  Her speaking clients include L’Oreal, Women in Banking, Capital One, Mid-Atlantic Women in Energy, Society of Women Engineers, and the American Heart Association to name a few. 

Join Lois Barth, along with your fellow university relations, talent acquisition and other human resource leaders from corporate, non-profit and government agencies at the:

College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY

Organized by College Recruiter and hosted by Ernst & Young

Thursday, December 12, 2019

9:30 AM – 2:30 PM (EST)

Ernst & Young World Headquarters

121 River Street

Hoboken, NJ 07030

For more information and tickets, go to: http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/BootcampOnDIatEY

Ernst & Young's world headquarters in Hoboken, New Jersey

Posted March 19, 2019 by

Call for presentations for the 12/12/2019 College Recruiting Bootcamp in D&I at EY

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. 

One of the many ways that we back up our belief is by giving back to the talent acquisition and hiring manager communities by hosting one or two College Recruiting Bootcamp employer user conferences each year. We designed these events to be VERY low cost, VERY engaging, and VERY productive for the attendees.

Our 16th of these events was the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google in December 2018 at their main campus in Mountain View. As we ended that event, I told attendees that we were planning to return to New York City or Washington, D.C. for the next event. We are. On December 12th, we will hold the College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY across the Hudson River from Manhattan at the new, world headquarters of Ernst & Young.

Each event has a different theme, based in part on the brand of the host organization. We’ve worked with EY for about a decade and they have always been passionate about diversity and inclusion. But, unlike other diversity and inclusion events, this event will go beyond skin color by challenging some of the long-held beliefs in the world of college and university relations. Some examples of topics we may cover:

  • Why are a rapidly increasing minority of employers are becoming school and even major agnostic?
  • Why are some organizations no longer recruiting on-campus and instead hiring hundreds or even thousands using virtual sources such as job boards and social media?
  • Most organizations that hire a lot of talent from colleges and universities value diversity, but should their talent acquisition teams and hiring managers involved in that process also be diverse?
  • Does diversity extend to the school type and, if so, how are employers being more inclusive in their hiring by opening their doors to students and recent graduates of one- and two-year colleges instead of just those from four-year colleges and universities?

Want more information about the College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY? Please go to our information and ticketing page.

Posted February 07, 2019 by

AI, Algorithms, and Who Owns the Outcome

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our closing keynote was delivered by John Sumser, Principal Analyst for HRExaminer, an independent analyst firm covering HR technology and the intersection of people, tech, and work.

(more…)

Posted February 07, 2019 by

Merging Technologies and People for the Workforce of the Future

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our featured presentation was delivered by Alexandra Levit, author of Humanity Works, speaker, consultant, futurist, Chair of the DeVry University Career Advisory Board think tank, and expert in all things workplace.

(more…)

Posted December 03, 2018 by

Interview by Peter Clayton of Total Picture about the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google on Mon 12/10/2018

 

One of my favorite people in the recruitment industry is Peter Clayton of TotalPicture Media. Without a doubt, he is the most knowledge and capable videographer in the industry. When I hear that he’s involved in a project, I know that the project will go well.

Peter and I recently sat down…about 1,266 miles apart, to discuss next Monday’s College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google. Over the past decade, College Recruiter has organized 16 of these one-day conferences for talent acquisition and human resource leaders. All have essentially broken even, none have lost much money, and none have made much money. And that’s the way we planned them. We wanted to do something that would enable us to give back to the recruiting industry and a no-pitch, educational conference that moves around the country seemed like a great idea as there is a tremendous amount of turnover in talent acquisition and human resources, especially amongst those whose primary focus is the recruitment of people early in their careers, including college and university relations recruitment leaders. (more…)

Posted May 08, 2018 by

How does programmatic job ad buying benefit talent acquisition and other HR leaders?

 

Over the past couple of years, those of us who make our living in the job board world have grown from being aware of the existence of programmatic ad buying, to understanding the opportunities and threats it poses. We grew to either be terrified by it or embrace it, or some combination of the two. At College Recruiter, we made the decision early on to embrace programmatic job ad buying because we saw that the opportunity it presented to our employer customers (and therefore us) far outweighed the threat that it posed.

Since 1991, when I founded the organization that became College Recruiter, I’ve often been accused of chasing after every shiny new thing. That’s not fair. I do chase after shiny new things, but not always. And sometimes they chase after me. Also, the accusation can be interpreted as a negative character trait. That’s also not fair because seeing opportunities and risks where others don’t can be valuable. That’s true whether you’re a caveman hunting for food or a talent acquisition or other human resources leader hunting for more efficient and effective ways of attracting the talent that your organization needs–not just to survive but also to thrive.

Case in point: programmatic job ad buying. This was the shiny new thing that proved to be worthy of attention. (more…)

Posted April 23, 2015 by

Ten Ways to Improve Education through Technology

An IT classroom laptops on the desks and an interactive white board with blank screens to add your own image or text

An IT classroom with laptops on the desks and an interactive white board with blank screens to add your own image or text. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The past twenty five years have seen huge advances in technology. You only need to look at your current mobile phone with all its apps and features, and then compare it to the brick you were carrying around way back then to see the proof.

Disappointingly however, these advances in technology also have a downside. Children of today are now transfixed with all the computer games, the Internet, social media, iPods, and of course their mobile phones. No longer are children inclined to read a book, play outside with their friends or do the kind of activities that children use to do in previous generations. Furthermore the use of calculators and the spell checker on computers has taken away the very basics that are needed to lay the foundations of a good education, namely basic arithmetic and spelling.

Yet in spite of this, there are benefits to be gained through the use of technology in the educational environment. Most households in non third world countries now have access to a computer. This has been the main contributor to improvements in education, and through its use there are many ways to improve education through technology. (more…)

Posted February 18, 2015 by

4 Résumé Tips for Job-Seekers with Limited Work Experience

Writing resume, young handsome business man working in office

Writing resume, young business man working in office. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Whether you’re entering the job market for the first time or looking to shift gears in your career, it’s easy to feel intimidated by solicitations for employment. But don’t let the education, work experience, and laundry list of other qualifications deter you.

Here are some ways to fill the voids in your résumé, position yourself as the perfect candidate, and land the interview. (more…)

Posted November 10, 2014 by

How the GSA recruits and develops top entry-level talent through its Emerging Leaders program

Jayana Cali Garvey

Jayana Cali Garvey

Are you a recruiting leader for a federal, state, or local government agency? Is your agency struggling to replace the talent which is retiring or about to retire? Are you having a hard time figuring out how to recruit, retain, and develop today’s recent college grads so that they’ll be ready, willing, and able to become your next generation of leaders?

Join your fellow government human resource specialist and other leaders from dozens of agencies at the GSA office across from the L’Enfant Plaza in D.C. on Monday, December 8th as your fellow government employees share the good, the bad, and the ugly how to save time, make their budgets go further, and recruit the most sought after college grads and students.

The day will feature a series of focused and intense presentations by eight of the leading experts in hiring and managing Millennials. We’ll start at 10am and be finished by 3:30pm and even have time for lunch so be prepared to walk away from your day with as much information as you would if you traveled halfway across the country for a three day event. (more…)

Posted August 27, 2014 by

How to put your degree to work for you

Black graduation cap with degree on white background

Black graduation cap with degree on white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

A big misconception about employment is that it is hard for new graduates to get jobs.  Many people think that getting a degree is not a sure fire way of getting a job, however the problem is not with the degree but with the person holding it.

The main problem for new graduates is how they go about getting jobs.  They think because they add their degree on their resume that potential employers will be jumping at the bit for their services.

New graduates make the mistake of relying on their degree for work instead of putting their degree to work for them.  This article will show 3 things you can do to improve your job hunting campaign if you’re a new graduate. (more…)