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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 21, 2014 by

Writing Cover Letters for Jobs, Recent College Graduates? 4 Things They Should Achieve

When writing cover letters for jobs, recent college graduates should make sure they achieve four things.  Find out what they are in the following post.

Every element, from top to bottom, of your cover letter is important. To impress the reader (and to get them to take longer than 6.2 seconds on your resume), though, there are four goals every cover letter you send must accomplish…

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Posted July 11, 2014 by

Seeking Your First Entry Level Job? Focus on Your Personal Brand

One way to improve your chances of getting an entry level job is to show what you can bring to the table.  In the following post, learn about creating your own personal brand.

Think of the concept of branding like this: A hiring manager has two different candidates under consideration. All elements being equal: Candidate A: Has general ambition, good potential, skills and grades Candidate B: Has specific ambition demonstrated by two different internships applicable to the role they are interviewing for; They

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Posted May 23, 2014 by

Treat Your Entry Level Job Like Customer Service

Once you land an entry level job (or any job), you should treat it like a customer service position.  The following post explains how you can emphasize this concept in the workplace.

Pop quiz: Name one job that doesn’t include customer service. You can’t. That’s because it wouldn’t be a job unless you were providing some sort of service to somebody. (Click here to tweet this thought.) The intern serves the entry-level guy who answers to a supervisor who reports to a

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Posted May 21, 2014 by

Searching for Recent Graduate Jobs? How Mere Exposure Can Benefit Your Ability to Network

When it comes to networking for recent graduate jobs, mere exposure could make the difference in your job search.  Learn about this concept and some do’s and don’ts of it in the following post.

As young professionals, we’re taught to network like our careers depend on it. Your professional network can open just about any door. All we have to do to capture that holy grail of networking is put ourselves out there, and then we’re golden. We’re told to just “start networking,” but in reality it’s

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Posted April 04, 2014 by

Have a Full-Time Entry Level Job and Getting Your MBA? 4 Tips to Balance Both

You’ve got a full-time entry level job, while also going back to school to earn your MBA.  If you need some help with balancing both of these parts of your career, learn four tips in the following post.

Are you a current or prospective MBA student? Our MBA Corner is just for you. Students pursuing an online MBA face distinct challenges — as well as unique opportunities for growth — when attempting to simultaneously maintain a full-time job. The concept of a work-life balance is a familiar one

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Posted March 24, 2014 by

Uncertain About Taking Recent Graduate Jobs? 7 Questions College Grads Should Ask Themselves When Making a Career Decision

Before accepting recent graduate jobs or making other career decisions, college graduates should ask themselves seven questions found in the following post.

Your 20s are an important time. We’re told the personal and professional choices you make during this decade set the foundation of your adult life. No pressure, right? A good problem you’re likely to face is which job to take: The one that promises security or the one that promises experience? The higher-paid one or the

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Posted February 06, 2014 by

5 Ways to Show Engagement During Your Entry Level Job Search

When searching for an entry level job, be aware that employers might be looking at how engaged you would be as a potential employee.  Learn five ways to show engagement in the following post.

Any time you interview for a job, you know companies scrutinize your education, work history, manners, social media presence, wardrobe and more. (Hint: Don’t forget breath mints.) But did you know they’re likely screening for engagement, too? Disengaged employees are a pox on all they touch — they kill sales, bum out

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Posted January 02, 2014 by

Making a Presentation at Your Entry Level Job. Tips to Make Yours Effective

Do you need some help for an upcoming presentation at your entry level job?  If so, the following post offers tips to make your presentation effective.

Wherever you are in your professional career (or schooling), it’s safe to assume you’ve had the pleasure of sitting through a presentation or two. Chances are, these presentations have fallen flat in at least one way or another: too many slides, not engaging, psychedelic concept. Whatever it may have been, the

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Posted November 14, 2013 by

Seeking Entry Level Jobs? Write Cover Letters that are Worth Reading

One way that recent college graduates applying for entry level jobs can gain a potential employer’s attention is to write a cover letter that is worth reading.  The following post shares tips for writing an effective cover letter.

I read an article recently that detailed why 95% of recruiters don’t read cover letters. One recruiter put it best when he said cover letters were generally so bad, he concluded they weren’t worth reading. From the candidate perspective, it is clear we don’t like writing them: “Well, it doesn’t say a cover letter is required

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Posted September 20, 2013 by

Why You Should not Look for Work/Life Balance on Your Entry Level Job

While most of us have heard about achieving work/life balance, perhaps this is not the best option for everyone.  If you have an entry level job or other position, the following post suggests seeking something different.

If you are striving for work-life balance, you’re missing the point. The concept is based on a flawed assumption. The assumption is that work stinks. Only if work has a negative connotation can there be a need to seek balance. If work is basically a positive experience, one need not flee from it to engage this different

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