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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 17, 2016 by

2 ways to build a professional network in college

College students hanging around campus photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Going to college not only gives you the opportunity to further your education but also to meet new people. As you are pursuing your college degree, focus on making quality contacts. For example, developing relationships with other college students is smart in case you forget a homework assignment or need a study buddy. Those relationships can become friendships, and when it’s time to find an internship or an entry-level job, your new friends may know someone in their networks who can help you.

College is also a great opportunity to build a professional network. Getting to know other college students, and faculty and staff helps you establish relationships that can be beneficial for your job search. Bruce Harpham, Founder of Projectmanagementhacks.com, offers two tips for building a professional network in college.

1-Read the alumni newsletter or magazine, and contact graduates you read about. Many colleges have a magazine or newsletter that shares alumni news. Practice reading the publication and contact graduates you read about to ask about their businesses and careers. For example, the Ohio State Alumni magazine is published six times per year. Take two hours on a quiet afternoon to read previous issues.

2-Make the most of campus events. Many colleges and universities invite authors, business leaders, and others to visit and give presentations. Make the most of these events by sitting in the front row (or as close as you can get), taking notes, and then asking a question during the Q&A session. This is a great way to make connections.”

Want more advice about how to build your professional network? Visit the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Bruce Harpham, Founder of Projectmanagementhacks.com

Bruce Harpham, Founder of Projectmanagementhacks.com

Bruce Harpham is the Founder of Projectmanagementhacks.com, a career development resource, and freelance writer. Bruce’s writing has appeared in CIO, InfoWorld, CSO, ProjectManagement.com, and other publications. Bruce lives in Toronto, Canada.

Posted May 28, 2016 by

Core advantages of vocational and technical education programs

Engineering photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

There are many purposes served by vocational and technical colleges. These colleges create many opportunities for students to further their professional careers and to earn more money. They also offer many career programs in practical fields that don’t require academic training in traditional four-year programs.

This article will present some core advantages of vocational and technical courses offered by colleges to high school students.

Shortening freshman year

For high school students, the most prominent and motivating factor of enrolling into vocational programs is that they enable students to shorten their freshman year in college. Since the college years are in a traditional four-year degree program, quarters and semesters usually involve credits earned. Students can considerably shorten their freshman year and earn enough college credits during high school. This might add up enough to cut freshman year in half for some.

Winning college credits

It is a fact that high schools do not offer this option. However, there are many vocational and technical colleges that provide entry-level classes to students studying in high schools who have established a good capacity and ability for college education. Usually, this is ascertained through a counselor or mentor who guides students, even though there are some schools that allow high school students to enroll for classes.

Since college level classes are taken by high school students, they are given the chance by vocational and technical programs to start their college education. Usually, students can attend classes at night, after the end of their regular high school duration. The credits won by these programs can be put toward first-year generals at a conventional education center.

Getting used to college years

The environment of a vocational and technical college program is one between high school and college. This approach makes an undeniably perfect learning environment for high school students to become familiar with a different learning experience.

Typically, students want the stress-free and informal learning environment, and they can experience it by enrolling into a vocational program. It is a common fact that high school is usually infamous for being filled with ‘cliques,’ but the college life is more relaxed, as it involves more social aspect and social interaction.

Creating a perfect college application

The college application process for admission is another one of the motivating factors for taking a vocational and technical program during high school. Students want admissions to highly desirable and top-ranking universities, but getting in a college or university is fierce competition. Thus, students will have to do everything to make their college applications the best.

Specialty career programs

The subject matter in specialty courses is one more reason to consider vocational programs during high school. If we talk about the United Kingdom, there are many high schools dropping numerous elective programs and the budget cuts are the main reason behind it. There are many cases in which the first subjects and programs to be dropped are physical activities like shop, band, and physical education.

For students with interests in any of these programs, their only option available is taking them at a vocational college. They can find an extensive array of these vocational programs at most vocational and technical colleges. Plus, the bonus is students will get in-depth and hands on vocational classes they can’t find in high school.

Considering educational opportunities for your future? Visit the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

John Kelly is a professional and proactive article writer, as well as an education counselor. He also provides UK writing help to customers for enhancing their skills and knowledge. He also writes articles for the benefit of students.

Posted March 24, 2016 by

Selecting schools for college recruiting

When selecting colleges and universities to recruit from, employers must consider a variety of factors.  This article and accompanying video series, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, explore selecting schools for college recruiting in depth and features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

When selecting schools to recruit from, examine the career services office and resources on campus. Does the career services office offer resume books, on-campus interview opportunities, career fairs, or other opportunities for engagement with students? Not every college or university offers these events. When are these events and opportunities available? The school’s event cycle may not match your recruiting and hiring cycle. How much does the school charge for these services/events? Weigh the costs charged by the university when selecting schools to recruit from as well.

Employers must also consider how many other employers they will be competing against in comparison to the number of students/grads or candidates available. It may be better to be a large fish in a small pond. Unless you have fabulous job offers to present, you might not be able to attract top talent.

When selecting schools for college recruiting, it’s also important to evaluate student enrollment data. If you need to hire MBA graduates, and the university’s MBA program is not one of its better programs, that school may not be the best fit for your college recruiting program.

The next video provides tips about narrowing down their list of schools to recruit from.

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Employers should never be afraid to narrow down their target list for selecting schools for college recruiting from year to year. Recruiters will discover that retention is key; you may get terrific talent, but if you can’t retain star employees long-term, a particular college or university might not be the best fit for your company. The longer you recruit, the more historical data you’ll have to fall back on.

Always evaluate and assess your data. Ask the career services office for information about where their students are finding employment. Most career services directors are willing to partner with employers; career services directors who are willing to go above and beyond can help make up for lack of services and events they may not provide. Career services employees can provide employers with the chance to brand themselves on campus and to gain much-needed exposure on campus; they also keep employers in the loop and introduce recruiters to faculty members. Relationships with faculty members prove key in the college recruiting process.

In the last video, experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou discuss the need to adapt recruiting strategy from school to school.

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The WorkPlace Group experts encourage adaptation of strategy based on the situation and school. There may be some times when it’s appropriate to post jobs online only, and some situations when it’s better to have a strong on-campus presence. It’s important to have a tiered structure around college recruiting. Not all colleges and universities are the same; whatever amount of effort you put into college recruiting will determine your outcomes.

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

Posted March 19, 2016 by

6 part-time jobs for college students in 2016

Looking for part-time job message courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Constantin Stanciu/Shutterstock.com

Are you a college student who needs a little bit of extra money? Sometimes, students can find a work-study position or other type of on-campus job, but those are sometimes few and far between, especially at colleges with large student bodies. If students haven’t found jobs on campus they like, it’s time to look elsewhere. Fortunately, there are a number of great part-time jobs out there college students are ideally suited for. Here are six highly remunerative part-time jobs college students may be interested in.

1. Non-profit charity fundraiser

Charities are always looking for young people to help them out, especially in the fundraising department. This type of job often entails manning donation tables at various events, which means college students are going to be talking to a lot of people. They’ll need to be able to memorize facts about the charity and who it helps, be personable, and be able to smile and chat for hours. It’s not a job for introverts, but for those who are outgoing and want to gain experience working for nonprofits, it’s a great option. It also pays well—students can make up to $30/hour!

2. Social media assistant

Everyone is on some form of social media these days, but not everyone has mastered it. Some small business owners don’t even have time to really develop their social media because they’re so busy handling everything else, and they don’t have the money to hire someone full-time. However, many can budget money for a part-time social media assistant. If college students love Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms and don’t mind putting in the time to learn how to truly harness these sites for a business, then this is a great job for them. It can pay as much as $21/hour.

3. Academic tutor

If college students are peculiarly sharp in one particular subject area, they might want to offer their services as academic tutors to other students. Sometimes, these jobs are available through the university, but there’s nothing stopping them from doing private tutoring. Students will need to be sure they thoroughly understand the subject, and know how to explain it to others. They will be able to set their own rate and schedule, which is nice, but there’s no guarantee being a tutor will be steady work. Tutors make anything from $15 to $30 a tutoring session, but the rate and the length of each session has to be negotiated.

4. Freelance content writer

Many websites, blogs, and online publications are in need of content, and while some do have writers on staff, many look to freelance writers for new content. College students can find a number of these jobs online, and many don’t require much experience in writing, as long as they can show them a few well-written sample articles. Their pay will be negotiated on a case-by-case basis. Sometimes, students will be paid per word, while other clients may want to set a flat rate per article. On the upside, they’ll be able to work when they want and can do so from home.

Receptionist wearing a headset and glasses smiling courtesy of Shutterstock.com

CJM Grafx/Shutterstock.com

5. Office assistant

It may not sound glamorous, but being an office assistant is a good, steady job for college students. Students get to see first-hand how an office environment works, and the skills they develop can be useful in their own careers. Here are some of the tasks they may do as an office assistant:

• Answer the phones

• Do filing and organization

• Do light computer work

• Schedule appointments

• Assist employees with various tasks as needed

Students’ duties may vary depending on where they work, but those listed are fairly common. Through the job, they may learn about various computer problems, organizational methods, and more. During off-job hours, students can easily stay connected with their customers via cloud phone systems. If they get office assistant jobs at a business in their fields, they may even be able to turn their part-time gigs into full-time jobs when they graduate.

6. Guest services coordinator

A guest services coordinator assists customers with all of their needs. They may do returns, help customers find products, or do special orders in a retail setting. However, guest services can be found in many different industries. Some may actually do more office work, while others may work in support roles. No matter what industry students are working in, however, they’ll be dealing with customers, so this is another job in which being a people person is a must. It’s possible to make as much as $21 in one of these positions.

Want to learn more about different jobs, visit College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Sandra Lambert

Sandra Lambert, guest writer

Sandra Lambert is a CISCO certified computer networking specialist. She has a keen interest in writing about her knowledge and experiences. She writes about technology as well as about business. She has also developed interest in public speaking. You can follow her on Google+ and Twitter.

Posted February 19, 2016 by

Employers benefit from career services offices

As employers focus on best practices in college recruiting, one of the ways they can create a quality candidate experience is to partner with career services offices. These offices serve as resources that can connect recruiters and hiring managers to college students and recent graduates. Orvil Savery, HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans, shares different ways employers benefit from working with career services offices.

Photo of Orvil Savery

Orvil Savery, HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans

“Employers can benefit most working with career services offices at colleges or universities by challenging, working with, and lastly, advocating for not the needs of just now but the needs of students and employers five, 10, or 15 years down the road. The future isn’t something we don’t see coming, so simply doing what’s always been done isn’t going to benefit long-term interest. Allowing recruiters and hiring managers more say in what gets built and implemented, all while doing so under the umbrella of a reciprocal, collaborative, and diversified understanding is beneficial to both sides.

Employers benefit from these relationships by having a great pool of applicants, short lead times, heavy brand awareness, needs and wants based programming, and increasing diversity in the workplace.”

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

Orvil Savery is a University of Missouri graduate and lover of all things involving talent management. He serves as a HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans. He is dedicated to nurturing, cultivating, and recruiting an inclusive and diverse workforce in which all employees can deliver results through their own unique skill sets, backgrounds, and perspectives to enhance the lives of our colleagues, clients, and community.

Posted February 12, 2016 by

Interview questions recruiters can ask job candidates

Every company has its own interview process designed to learn more about job candidates. How college students and recent graduates answer questions from an interviewer can make or break their chances of landing entry-level jobs. Recruiters and hiring managers can ask candidates a variety of interview questions during the hiring process. Dennis Theodorou, Executive Search Expert and Vice President of Operations at JMJ Phillip Executive Search, discusses his company’s interview process and offers questions recruiters may ask candidates in general.

Job applicant answering interview questions courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

“December and May are peak hiring times for the majority of employers, and that allows us to hire directly out of several of the top-ranked colleges. In a strong hiring year, well over 100 recent graduates are interviewed, and we’ll hire as many as 10. Some of the top qualities we’re searching for when hiring for any one of our workforce and recruiting companies are listed below.

We consider our first interview a fairly easy process; the first round interview focuses more on general knowledge, passions, goals in life, etc., and that allows the job candidate to be less anxious and communicate freely. The second interview, which some have dubbed “the beat down session,” is where we dive into behavioral economics and reasons why people do the things they do. What we’re seeking from college graduates at this point in the interview process is whether or not they will fit into our culture naturally.

Employers want to know if the job candidate can operate autonomously. As a college graduate, can you honestly work well within a team when needed? Are you motivated? Are you a hustler in your work ethics? Are you naturally curious and willing to learn something new every day? How well do you deal with adversity? Do you have the ability to develop customer service skills in order to deal with client? These are questions employers should ask to really understand who they’re hiring. For some of our positions, we look for signs and ask if they possess the business acumen and creativity to develop and contribute to profitable ideas. We may be hiring a college student, but one who has the skills and qualities of a professional ready to take on the workforce!”

Interested in learning more about interview questions, go to College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Mr. Dennis Theodorou has more than 15 years of operational excellence and executive experience across multiple industries including: executive search, supply chain, manufacturing, retail and hospitality. Mr. Theodorou graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Supply Chain Management from the leading supply chain management college in the world: Michigan State University. He has continued his education through graduate-level course work at Harvard University. As a development agent for Subway, he managed and led an entire region of store locations including the management of self-owned stores, franchise development, real estate and area management. As a national expert in hiring, he has hired more than 700 employees over his entire career span and works hand-in-hand with companies to help on board top talent. Currently as Vice President of JMJ Phillip, he manages a portfolio of executive recruiting and employment service brands, spanning multiple locations and across nearly all verticals.

Posted October 07, 2015 by

Create a diverse workforce by finding talent

Creating a diverse workforce requires effort from employers. However employers define diversity, they must recruit and hire the best candidates. Employers must go directly to the talent sources.

To help explore these issues, College Recruiter recently hosted a College Recruiting Bootcamp on LGBT and other diversity hiring issues on Tuesday, September 29, at the Twilio headquarters in San Francisco.

College Recruiter has been publishing the opinions from a number of talent acquisition and recruiting leaders about why and how employers should diversify their workforces. Idan Shpizear, Co-Founder and CEO of 911 Restoration, explains how employers can create diversity in the workforce by finding the talent they need. (more…)

Posted August 07, 2015 by

College Life 101: A Student’s Guide to Saving Money in School

happy student with a money at the school desk on the white background

Happy student with a money at the school desk on the white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Students need to be their own personal financial managers. They also need to be financial planners, looking at future expenses. How can you survive the money pit of college? By planning and managing your money vigilantly. Avoiding overspending and accumulating high credit card balances are important goals for success.

Books and Materials

One of the first major expenses is textbooks. You can save significantly by renting your books. Many students buy used books and materials. Make sure that any interactive materials, such as CDs, website codes, and more, are transferable. Some students share books, especially when they have different class periods.

Materials, such as art supplies, can wreck a budget. Ask your instructor if any stores offer student discounts. Sometimes, you need a voucher or coupon from the college; but, generally, your student ID is sufficient. How much can you save? Up to 25 percent on average. (more…)

Posted May 06, 2015 by

How to Prevent the Bug of Plagiarism in College Students?

Stop Plagiarism red sign with sun background

Stop Plagiarism red sign with sun background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Let us discuss why and how college and university going students are entangled in this concept which is discouraged and dejected by every educational facility.

Content

Plagiarism is considered totally unethical but let us be honest, how many of us have not performed this unscrupulous activity in the years of our college? Similarly, five out of every ten students perform this activity in their schools, high schools or even colleges. But what drives them towards this immoral and corrupt practice? Why do they plagiarize material when they have their own neurons working within their mind? It is their lethargy! Students do not want to compete and participate, they avoid and run from hard work and fail to develop the understanding of mental exertion. For them, success has to be achieved from the easy path with no effort and struggle. Young students, for example, in their early school or high school years take help from this concept, by totally copying and pasting the material for their own good. They do not understand that this concept is totally scandalous and not appreciated by the professionals. We can start by highlighting the negativity of plagiarism; some students do not even understand and realize what plagiarism is. For them it is just taking help from the online available articles by copying the exact words and sentences. They should be taught that repetition and replication of data without citing the correct sources is stealing. Even the college and university going students who are mature enough to understand the concept, perform the same activity, intentionally or unintentionally. That is why, a new system of checks and balance has been introduced which is known as the plagiarism detection software. Different international education related organizations have initiated the concept and this has been, since then used by various schools and colleges. Let us talk about this new resolution and its elements. (more…)

Posted April 23, 2015 by

Ten Ways to Improve Education through Technology

An IT classroom laptops on the desks and an interactive white board with blank screens to add your own image or text

An IT classroom with laptops on the desks and an interactive white board with blank screens to add your own image or text. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The past twenty five years have seen huge advances in technology. You only need to look at your current mobile phone with all its apps and features, and then compare it to the brick you were carrying around way back then to see the proof.

Disappointingly however, these advances in technology also have a downside. Children of today are now transfixed with all the computer games, the Internet, social media, iPods, and of course their mobile phones. No longer are children inclined to read a book, play outside with their friends or do the kind of activities that children use to do in previous generations. Furthermore the use of calculators and the spell checker on computers has taken away the very basics that are needed to lay the foundations of a good education, namely basic arithmetic and spelling.

Yet in spite of this, there are benefits to be gained through the use of technology in the educational environment. Most households in non third world countries now have access to a computer. This has been the main contributor to improvements in education, and through its use there are many ways to improve education through technology. (more…)