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Posted May 28, 2016 by

Core advantages of vocational and technical education programs

Engineering photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

There are many purposes served by vocational and technical colleges. These colleges create many opportunities for students to further their professional careers and to earn more money. They also offer many career programs in practical fields that don’t require academic training in traditional four-year programs.

This article will present some core advantages of vocational and technical courses offered by colleges to high school students.

Shortening freshman year

For high school students, the most prominent and motivating factor of enrolling into vocational programs is that they enable students to shorten their freshman year in college. Since the college years are in a traditional four-year degree program, quarters and semesters usually involve credits earned. Students can considerably shorten their freshman year and earn enough college credits during high school. This might add up enough to cut freshman year in half for some.

Winning college credits

It is a fact that high schools do not offer this option. However, there are many vocational and technical colleges that provide entry-level classes to students studying in high schools who have established a good capacity and ability for college education. Usually, this is ascertained through a counselor or mentor who guides students, even though there are some schools that allow high school students to enroll for classes.

Since college level classes are taken by high school students, they are given the chance by vocational and technical programs to start their college education. Usually, students can attend classes at night, after the end of their regular high school duration. The credits won by these programs can be put toward first-year generals at a conventional education center.

Getting used to college years

The environment of a vocational and technical college program is one between high school and college. This approach makes an undeniably perfect learning environment for high school students to become familiar with a different learning experience.

Typically, students want the stress-free and informal learning environment, and they can experience it by enrolling into a vocational program. It is a common fact that high school is usually infamous for being filled with ‘cliques,’ but the college life is more relaxed, as it involves more social aspect and social interaction.

Creating a perfect college application

The college application process for admission is another one of the motivating factors for taking a vocational and technical program during high school. Students want admissions to highly desirable and top-ranking universities, but getting in a college or university is fierce competition. Thus, students will have to do everything to make their college applications the best.

Specialty career programs

The subject matter in specialty courses is one more reason to consider vocational programs during high school. If we talk about the United Kingdom, there are many high schools dropping numerous elective programs and the budget cuts are the main reason behind it. There are many cases in which the first subjects and programs to be dropped are physical activities like shop, band, and physical education.

For students with interests in any of these programs, their only option available is taking them at a vocational college. They can find an extensive array of these vocational programs at most vocational and technical colleges. Plus, the bonus is students will get in-depth and hands on vocational classes they can’t find in high school.

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John Kelly is a professional and proactive article writer, as well as an education counselor. He also provides UK writing help to customers for enhancing their skills and knowledge. He also writes articles for the benefit of students.

Posted December 05, 2014 by

College Acceptance and Friendship: The Social Trap

Close-up of an 'Approved' College Application letter

Close-up of an ‘Approved’ College Application letter. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

This time of year, seniors probably have their SAT scores or will be receiving them very soon. And, within a few days, most seniors will be sending out the last of their college applications. There is a nerve-wracking waiting period between December 1st and early spring, when acceptance letters arrive. Most students worry about where they will be attending college next year but don’t think much about their student colleagues. However, maintaining friendships during this time can be tricky. (more…)

Posted November 27, 2013 by

Prep for College Admissions: 4 Easy Tips

Admissions and other words written on a chalkboard

Admissions and other words written on a chalkboard. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

“But she just started high school,” you think to yourself, when your daughter brings home info about the PSAT. She’s doing all that she can to keep up in her physics class, and now she’s supposed to start thinking about the next four-year segment of her education? A Forbes article titled “Why Start Preparing for College in the Sixth Grade” says as many as 90 percent of college-bound high school seniors wish they’d started preparing earlier. Today’s high school students juggle college prep classes, sports and part-time jobs, all while researching colleges, choosing fields of study and applying for financial aid. Here are four things your teen should remember to help them navigate the path to college: (more…)

Posted September 17, 2013 by

Three misconceptions about getting into college

Sign with arrow pointing towards Admissions Office

Sign with arrow pointing towards Admissions Office. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Misconceptions seem to creep into every element of college admissions. From the importance of standardized test scores to the best admission essay tactics, myths float around the whole process. Whereas in some ways college admission is mysterious, in many other ways it’s predictable and misconceptions can be easily debunked.

Here are three misconceptions students have about getting into college and why they’re off. (more…)

Posted September 12, 2013 by

6 Myths about College Admissions

If you are preparing to fill out college applications, beware of six myths concerning college admissions.

All across America, the parents of rising high school seniors are gearing up to help their children tackle this fall’s college applications. Yes, there’s a lot of excitement about taking this major step, but it’s mixed with a liberal dose of dread: Acceptance to top schools gets more brutally competitive every year. The number and variety of standardized tests seem to sprout like mushrooms. Were your kids really supposed to be building huts in Guatemala over the summer instead of lifeguarding? And why are there so many application essays to write now? (more…)

Posted July 24, 2013 by

Be Careful on Social Media! College Recruiters are Watching You

While prospective college students may see no harm in their activities on social media, college recruiters may disagree.  Learn more in the following post.

That said, with only 15 percent of schools having any policy whatsoever, that gives the vast majority of college recruiters complete freedom to surf your internet trail. Online behavior that can affect your chances of admission

Taken from –

Can Your Social Media Image Affect Your Chances of Getting Into …

Posted November 03, 2006 by

Full Blown College Admissions Frenzy

It becomes instantaneously obvious once anyone starts examing the plethora of requirements necessary to apply to college these days, that it is an amazingly complex and overwhelming process. Combine that fact with the many who are limited English speakers and first generation in their family to attend college that must weed through the requirements of this process with little or no guidance. Add in the mix the over programmed teen who, on top of monumental amounts of homework, extracurricular activities and perhaps a job must now apply to an average of a dozen universities just to assure acceptance into a college during the most competitive admissions cycle in history. Just examining last seasons percentage of admits at selective universities will verify this fact. http://www.college-connections.com/collegelinks.htm
There are those who continue to bombard the independent college consultant in their private efforts to guide these students. Their services invariably improve family relations and reduces stress. In addition, nearly all independent counselors take pro bono students. The simple truth is that thousands of students are not getting the guidance they need. Certainly there are countless effective counselors in schools across the country, but the counselor to student ratio is exorbitant. Some school counselors manage as many as 500 students. Add the vast amounts of additional jobs many of these counselors have including but not limited to scheduling, monitoring social behavior and writing recommendations. Many have job titles that include “guidance counselor”. How many times have I heard students say, “My counselor doesn’t know me” and then there are those students who don’t even know if their schools even have a college counselor. Universities have specific requirements for admittance. Yet, thousands get to their senior year without the necessary courses due to lack of guidance. These counselors simply cannot handle the large enrollments and it’s no surprise, as the schools are significantly under budgeted. Yes, there are those independent schools that manage well, whose ratio of counselor to students is 10:1, where students’ curriculums are reviewed and carefully managed. However, so many of these families still seek outside help for their college admission process.
The angst and anxiety of the college admissions process has reached new levels. Words like “admission frenzy” and “gaming the system” are all over the media. As a result, some of the top universities have eliminated early plans to try and quiet the storm. Private college consultants have become as necessary as any psychologist. Yet, how many psychologists do as much pro bono work as college consultants? Educational business is not a dirty word. Other factors driving the admissions intensity are the universities themselves. The business of college admissions is at an all time high. Large budgets are allocated for enrollment management divisions. Thousands of dollars are directed at recruiting students and encouraging more and more applications because it then can make the university look more selective. Just last week on one of my professional online digests was a request from a top admission official for marketing suggestions concerning online banner placements. College websites are huge business and placement of ads equally as important. After all, these are tremendous recruitment tools and yield does increase that U.S. News Ranking. Other factors driving the frenzy are undoubtedly the “helicopter” parent population. Many parents push their kids to the absolute limit to achieve what they didn’t and still hold beliefs that the way to a successful, secure future is through a top tier school – not necessarily so. Many state universities are notorious for having produced some of the most successful and influential people in the world. Peer pressure is added to this mix, creating anxious turmoil. The average number of senior applications is estimated at 12 to 15 schools per students. Last week at a selective independent school in Los Angeles, a nervous 9th grade parent group was encouraged to not think about college plans just yet.
Jeannie Borin, M.Ed.
IECA, Professional member
NACAC, Professional Member
www.college-connections.com

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