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Guidance counselor talking to a teenager. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted January 09, 2019 by

What colleges don’t want high school students and parents to consider during the application process

A friend of mine recently posted to Facebook that the guidance counselor at the high school her kids attend recently indicated that “most” colleges require at least three years of a second language in order to consider the student for possible admission. I called b.s. on that statement and then outlined some additional information that high school guidance counselors and college admissions representatives often either don’t know or, for whatever reason, often fail to communicate:

I know you and I are on the same page, but the guidance counselor is providing terrible guidance and needs to be more careful about accurately guiding her students. 

There are 8 Ivy League schools. There are 3,000, four-year colleges. There are another 4,300 one- and two-year colleges. 

Ivys represent 0.267 percent of four-year colleges. Hardly representative.

More important words of advice: Talk openly and honestly with your kids about the financial impact of college. 

Here is the reality: if a family is wealthy and can pay out of pocket — including savings — then the cost isn’t as important.  (more…)

Posted November 03, 2014 by

College Admissions Essays: What to Leave Behind and What to Keep

Ryan Hickey

Ryan Hickey, Managing Editor of Peterson’s & EssayEdge

An entire book could be written about your life. Regardless of whether or not you think it would be a particularly interesting book, the fact remains that you’ve had a lot of experiences that you could include in your admissions essays. Deciding on which parts of your life to highlight can be difficult, so follow these steps to guide you as you write your essays.

To make things easier, let go of the bad stuff first. Here’s what can be left behind. (more…)

Posted May 08, 2014 by

8 Ways to Earn Cash While in School

Young college student tutoring an older classmate

Young college student tutoring an older classmate. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

College students truly understand the definition of broke. Although some students attend school on a part-time basis and work to support themselves, the majority of students attend school full-time and seek part-time opportunities to generate extra cash.

Even if financial aid pays for your tuition and your parents give you money each month, these funds might not be enough. This is especially true if you have a car, bills and other expenses you need to cover. But given your school schedule, you may not have a lot of time for work.

Fortunately, several opportunities are available to you. Here are eight ways to make money as a college student that won’t take a lot of your time, or too much of your energy. (more…)

Posted March 14, 2014 by

Five college admissions tips for the A-minus student

Jessica Millis

Jessica Millis

As an A-minus student you are still at the top of your game and riding above a great deal of other students. There is a temptation to think you fell just short of excellence, but it is possible to get very far with an A-minus average. Here are a few pieces of advice that you may use prior to creating your college admissions. (more…)

Posted March 06, 2014 by

How to Use Social Media to Find the School of Your Dreams

Ashley Dunlap

Ashley Dunlap

If you’ve been looking for online college programs, by now you’ve realized that it can be more difficult than you first imagined. Many online programs are very new, making them hard to find through a simple search. Other programs, seemingly ubiquitous on the internet, are either not accredited or not able to give you the professional expertise that you will need after you graduate. Wading through what’s out there can be very difficult and it’s easy to miss a lot. What is a prospective degree candidate to do? (more…)

Posted November 27, 2013 by

Prep for College Admissions: 4 Easy Tips

Admissions and other words written on a chalkboard

Admissions and other words written on a chalkboard. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

“But she just started high school,” you think to yourself, when your daughter brings home info about the PSAT. She’s doing all that she can to keep up in her physics class, and now she’s supposed to start thinking about the next four-year segment of her education? A Forbes article titled “Why Start Preparing for College in the Sixth Grade” says as many as 90 percent of college-bound high school seniors wish they’d started preparing earlier. Today’s high school students juggle college prep classes, sports and part-time jobs, all while researching colleges, choosing fields of study and applying for financial aid. Here are four things your teen should remember to help them navigate the path to college: (more…)

Posted October 25, 2013 by

5 Misconceptions About The College Admissions Process

Myths and misinformation about the college admissions process seem to take on a life of their own. We’ve heard too many stories of both students and parents making decisions based on information from friends and relatives that doesn’t reflect actual admission practices and policies.

We’ve highlighted a few of the most common misconceptions so that you will recognize them when you hear them. Knowing fact from fiction will help ensure you don’t make a mistake that ends up hurting your chances for acceptance at the college of your dreams. (more…)

Posted September 17, 2013 by

Three misconceptions about getting into college

Sign with arrow pointing towards Admissions Office

Sign with arrow pointing towards Admissions Office. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Misconceptions seem to creep into every element of college admissions. From the importance of standardized test scores to the best admission essay tactics, myths float around the whole process. Whereas in some ways college admission is mysterious, in many other ways it’s predictable and misconceptions can be easily debunked.

Here are three misconceptions students have about getting into college and why they’re off. (more…)

Posted September 17, 2013 by

6 Things to Consider When Making a Decision to Apply Early for College

Someone filling out a college application

Someone filling out a college application. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

It is wise for prospective college students to apply early for college.  In the process of doing so, they should consider six things, according to the following post.

Meet Lisa, a rising high school senior. Bright, creative, and poised, Lisa has a good academic record and a full résumé that make her a potentially strong college applicant. Lisa has visited a few colleges and likes them all, but has no strong preference at this point. Still, she knows that these colleges allow students to apply Early Decision (or ED)—in other words, submit an application by November 1 or November 15 in exchange for a binding decision from the college by December 15. Lisa wonders if she should do more research, then send an Early Decision application to the school she thinks might be the best fit. She has heard that applying early might increase her odds of being accepted; plus, it would be a huge relief to have her college plans settled so early in the school year. (more…)

Posted September 12, 2013 by

6 Myths about College Admissions

If you are preparing to fill out college applications, beware of six myths concerning college admissions.

All across America, the parents of rising high school seniors are gearing up to help their children tackle this fall’s college applications. Yes, there’s a lot of excitement about taking this major step, but it’s mixed with a liberal dose of dread: Acceptance to top schools gets more brutally competitive every year. The number and variety of standardized tests seem to sprout like mushrooms. Were your kids really supposed to be building huts in Guatemala over the summer instead of lifeguarding? And why are there so many application essays to write now? (more…)