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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 05, 2016 by

Internships with small companies offer benefits

Interns Wanted / Internship concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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Many students place a higher value on “prestigious” internships at places like Goldman Sachs for finance, CNN for media, and Facebook for technology. While there is definitely value in interning for these firms, most of that value is derived from the perception of other people. I would encourage students to look smaller. I think experience working for small businesses and organizations can be the BIGGEST hidden gem in your college career. This played out in my own recruiting process. One of the best internships I had was with a small investment firm in Charlotte, North Carolina. The office consisted of only 15 people, and the internship was unpaid. However, I think I learned three years of skills and knowledge in my three months with the company. I have also seen this take place for other students I have interviewed on my podcast “Interns on Fire.” More often than not, students have a better experience interning for smaller organizations and here is why:

1. More responsibility: Since these companies are smaller, they lack the bureaucratic red tape that prevents interns from doing meaningful work. These companies are often competing against larger companies with 10% of the workforce. This translates to more meaningful work for interns.

2. More diversity: For many of the same reasons mentioned earlier, employees for these companies wear multiple hats. They have to coordinate events, answer customer calls, process orders, and manage key strategic initiatives. Since they work across different divisions, interns are more likely to do the same. Therefore, they will not be siloed into just one role or with just one task for their entire internships. Interns will likely get the opportunity to work across many different areas.

3. Better culture: Typically, smaller firms have better cultures and camaraderie. Because they are smaller, they tend to focus more on hiring people who are good culture fits. Hiring one bad egg does a lot more harm to a small organization than it does for a Fortune 500 company. Working for a smaller organization will give interns greater access to potential mentors and friends.

4. Ability to make an impact: Given that many small organizations have so much to accomplish with so few resources, they are often spread thin. In many cases, there have already identified a few valuable projects they just haven’t had the chance to work on yet. This leaves the door wide open for interns to come in and make an impact.

Don’t be afraid to go smaller. It can be the catalyst you need to jumpstart your college career. An internship with the right organization can be a game changer.

Interested in searching for internships? Check out our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Carl Schlotman IV, guest writer

Carl Schlotman IV, guest writer

Carl Schlotman IV was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio. Carl completed six internships in his collegiate career with world-class financial institutions such as: Bank of America, Merrill Lynch, and Goldman Sachs. After gaining experience with his internships and accepting a full-time offer with Wells Fargo Securities in Investment Banking upon graduation, Carl seeks to give back to younger students. He published his first book, Cash in Your Diploma, in April 2014.

Carl has spoken at several universities around the country to share his strategies and tactics for getting the job you want in the field of your choice, making the salary you desire. He also hosts a podcast highlighting the best student interns across the country, “Interns On Fire.”

Posted August 04, 2014 by

Interviewing for Jobs, College Graduates? What a Potential Employer Wants to Hear from You

When college graduates are interviewing for jobs, they should keep in mind what a potential employer wants to hear from them.  Find out what an employer wants to know during this meeting in the following post.

Ever think about what your future boss really wants to hear during the job interview? What can you say in that 45 minutes that greatly increases your chances of receiving a job offer? I recently heard some great advice that lined up with my previous experience as a human resources manager, so I’m sharing…

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Posted July 31, 2014 by

College Students, Want to Gain an Edge in Search for Jobs? 3 Reasons to Create a Personal Website

If college students are looking to distinguish themselves in their search for jobs, then creating a personal website might be the key.  Learn three reasons why in the following post.

Ask the self-employed and solopreneurs for advice on how to get your next gig and you’ll hear the same thing, over and over: “You need a website to land clients” Now ask yourself: If I am in a job search, doesn’t this same logic apply to me? Or is a killer resume and LinkedIn profile

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Posted July 21, 2014 by

Writing Cover Letters for Jobs, Recent College Graduates? 4 Things They Should Achieve

When writing cover letters for jobs, recent college graduates should make sure they achieve four things.  Find out what they are in the following post.

Every element, from top to bottom, of your cover letter is important. To impress the reader (and to get them to take longer than 6.2 seconds on your resume), though, there are four goals every cover letter you send must accomplish…

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Posted June 18, 2014 by

By the Numbers: Impress Recruiters with Your Resume

While you might focus on various parts of your resume, don’t forget to use numbers to make a powerful impression among recruiters.  In the following post, find out how to use them successfully in this document.

Companies of all shapes and sizes hire one thing (and one thing only): solution providers. And how do you show you are a solution provider? Numbers. Numbers define the size and scope of your previous employer, position, and contribution. Your accomplishments, both past and potential, are defined by these numbers. Employers, when looking for

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Posted June 06, 2014 by

Why Your Personal Brand is Not Helping You Find an Internship or Entry Level Job

If you don’t understand what your personal brand is about, it could make your ability to find an internship or an entry level job more challenging.  Learn more in the following post.

Everyone today is a brand. We have to be, because personal branding is vital to the way people treat us, pay us and follow our ideas. Despite what seems to be popular opinion, however, having a great linkedin profile and connecting via twitter and Facebook is not personal branding…

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Posted May 06, 2014 by

Are You Mobile Searching Jobs for Recent College Graduates? 5 Apps that Might Interest You

If you are one those job seekers who is searching jobs for recent college graduates on the go, the following post has five apps you may want to consider.

PepsiCo recently reported that 90 percent of people who clicked on their job-related emails used a smartphone to do so. 90 percent! “Instead of job hunting on a PC, people are doing so while standing in line at a restaurant or even sitting on a couch while watching the game,” CNN reports. So if you’re

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Posted March 03, 2014 by

Are These 5 Challenging Workplace Personalities on Your Entry Level Job?

On your entry level job, you might encounter a variety of personalities that can be hard to deal with.  In the following post, learn five of these personalities and how to get along with them.

This is a guest post by Judith Orloff . The workplace is filled with difficult personalities–bullies, know-it-alls, rumor mongers… Our fallback reaction when faced with problem people at work is to either assert ourselves or walk swiftly in the other direction. But there’s a middle ground, a way of communicating that’s

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Posted February 19, 2014 by

Want LinkedIn Endorsements When Searching Jobs for Recent College Graduates? Why They Don’t Mean Much to Recruiters

If you’ve obtained a lot of LinkedIn endorsements when searching jobs for recent college graduates, know that all recruiters won’t be impressed.  Find out why in the following post.

You know those LinkedIn Skill Endorsements you have on your profile… the ones where friends, co-workers and check a box indicating that you possess particular skills? They are meaningless. We asked more than 25 hiring managers and found that most of them don’t care much about how many people endorse your skills. So, why aren’t hiring managers warming

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Posted November 13, 2013 by

Want an Entry Level Job? 5 Resume Tips to Earn an Interview

As an entry level job seeker, you need to write a resume that focuses on the needs of a potential employer.  So, if you want to earn an interview, use these five resume tips in the following post.

Entry-level resumes tend to be plagued by bland formats and poorly-written objective statements. These serve only to provide employers with a vague, one-line statement about the type of position the job seeker wants. A resume shouldn’t be all about what you want—especially when it’s communicating in generalities.

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