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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 02, 2016 by

How to avoid 5 common study slip-ups

Female college student studying in a library courtesy of Shutterstock.com

michaeljung/Shutterstock.com

Highly effective students know how to study. They pace themselves and don’t save all of their studying for the last minute. They also know how to take notes along the way to make their studying more efficient. Cramming and other last-minute study techniques can leave them exhausted, and incapable of performing well on test day. Use these ideas to improve your study system, and get a better grade this time around.

1. Avoid cramming

If you absolutely have to cram before a test, try to take breaks. Sleep is important for learning, so find a few hours to sleep after a long study session, and you’ll be better able to think clearly during the test. Research shows the first sleep cycle lasts about three hours. After that, we dip in and out every one and a half hours. Try to sleep from three to four and a half hours before your test.

2. Create a habit

Studying at the same time every day allows students to study better for their tests and make time for important assignments. Pick a time when you are unlikely to be disturbed and aim for the same time each day. You’ll get a better study session, and your brain will start to become used to your study routine.

3. Study locations

The place where students study is important. If they find they study best in the library, they should make a habit of getting out of their dorms or apartments, and getting to the library first thing. Make home a safe place from school work, and find places outside of it to work hard and for preparation. This way, home can become a place to relax, unwind, and have some fun.

4. Set specific goals

If you’re working toward a master’s in higher education, your goals should be specific and relate not only to your coursework, but your future career. Create lesson plans to start building the skills to become a teacher. Conduct mock lectures when teaching the material you’re learning in school to an imaginary classroom. This will not only show what you haven’t learned, but will prepare you to become a more effective educator. The same goes if you plan to intern as a scientist in the lab or research assistant. Come up with appropriate scenarios and hands-on study that prepare you for your future career and still help you learn the material.

5. Don’t procrastinate

Treat studying like a job. The most important thing to remember is students don’t have to be in the mood for studying. Studying is a process, and they may have some good days and some bad days. It’s okay to have a bad study session. Don’t let your mood affect whether you’re going to study. Push through and make your habits stick, and the rest is easy.

If you’re going for a long study session, start with the most difficult subjects first. Move on to the easier subjects when fatigue becomes a factor. Remember to take frequent breaks, and eat foods high in protein and carbs to sustain your energy levels and to prevent dips in energy.

If you’re looking for more study tips, go to the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Brooke Chaplan

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Posted February 23, 2016 by

4 ways to overcome lack of experience

Have you ever interviewed for a job and been rejected because of your lack of work experience?

When you’re applying for entry-level jobs or internships as a college student or recent grad, this is a pretty common experience. Even though the career services office on your campus may have barked at you incessantly about applying for internships and part-time job opportunities, and your parents breathed down your neck over break about doing seasonal work to make some extra money, you may find yourself with very little work experience to list on your resume at this point.

If that’s the case, today’s Tuesday Tip video and article are for you. College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, offers four quick tips in a 5-minute video.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Lack experience? Get some.

Alanis Morissette should have added this to her lyrical list of ironies back in 1995. Recruiters don’t have much sympathy for job seekers without experience listed on their resumes, though. If you lack experience prior to the job search, the best remedy is to seek experience. The sooner you can gain experience, the better.

The worst thing you can do for yourself is to allow yourself the luxury of feeling bad about your lack of experience. The best thing you can do for yourself is to take action. A great first step is to register at CollegeRecruiter.com and search for job opportunities in your area.

2. List all experience.

If you can’t find a full-time job, settle for part-time employment. Combine a few part-time jobs if necessary. It’s best to find part-time employment in your preferred career field, of course, because this allows you to build a repertoire of skills you can use in that great entry-level full-time job you’ll land soon.

If you can’t find a paid part-time position, consider volunteering with a non-profit organization. You might be able to use the skills gained in your academic major to help the organization; this experience can be listed on your resume as well.

Don’t forget to list other experience on your resume as well, including paid and unpaid internships and your involvement in organizations both on-campus and off-campus.

3. Compensate with strong soft skills.

Soft skills are skills which you may have acquired as a college student (but not necessarily in the classroom); these skills are a combination of personality traits and habits which make you a quality employee and a pleasant person to interact with. Research shows that people with excellent soft skills tend to perform well at work; in fact, people with strong soft skills perform just as well (and sometimes better than) people with strong technical skills.

Some of the soft skills recruiters and talent acquisition professionals are looking for including communication skills, a strong work ethic, time management ability, problem-solving skills, and ability to work well under pressure.

When you’re in an interview, think about how you can sell yourself by demonstrating your soft skills. Think in advance how you would answer questions like, Tell me about a time when you faced a difficult problem. How did you solve it?

4. Seek additional training opportunities.

If you lack training which applies to the job opportunities you’re seeking, get some! There are multiple ways to seek training. You can take an extra college course in journalism, for example, if you want to write for your local newspaper but keep getting rejected when you apply for writing positions. You might also scour the internet and newspapers for local writers groups. These groups are free to join, and not only will you learn from other writers, but you might enjoy the fellowship and constructive criticism.

Ultimately, if you lack experience related to your career field, no one can gain it on your behalf.

It’s your responsibility to stake your claim in the world of work.

Taking steps in the direction of gaining work experience can be intimidating, but you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment each time you take one more step.

Why not take one more step forward today?

Work on the draft of your resume. Submit your final draft to the free resume editors at College Recruiter. Make an appointment with the career services department at your local university. Find out when the career fair will be hosted on your campus this spring. Register and search for jobs on College Recruiter’s website.

For more Tuesday Tips, subscribe to College Recruiter’s YouTube Channel, follow our blog, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

 

 

Posted February 01, 2016 by

In the job search, all experience matters

Babysitting experience with woman holding puppy and watching little girl

antoniodiaz/Shutterstock.com

When college students begin the job search process, they often feel defeated before they begin if they believe they have no real work experience, but that is never true. All have some knowledge and skills, and they are all transferable. For example, the only job a student may have had was babysitting, so a student may feel that won’t help them land an internship. It is true that others may have more experience, but there are transferable skills acquired from babysitting such as being organized and responsible. If the same family hired you over and over again, that demonstrates that you performed well.

Classroom-related experience is also of value to recruiters and hiring managers. While some candidates applying for the job may have done similar work before for pay, employers will also value the work you’ve completed for a grade so be sure to include academic projects on your resume related to the job opening. Remember to list what you’ve learned in the classroom under the “experience” heading on your resume. Even if you weren’t paid for the time, it doesn’t mean it wasn’t valuable and that you didn’t work just as hard as someone else who acquired similar skills.

 

Need more tips related to transferable skills, gaining work experience, and your job search? Follow our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for career tips and job search motivation.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We work to create a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and grads to excellent entry-level jobs.

 

Posted November 02, 2015 by

Online degrees and a career: 5 tips to staying on track

online degree / word cloud concept background

Online Degree / Word cloud concept background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

More and more students are pursuing an online degree while holding a full-time job. Online universities are a great opportunity for students going back to school, studying in the military, students pursuing a graduate or professional degree, or even a traditional student who needs to start working straight away after high school. However, balancing the rigors of an online degree while maintaining a successful career is easier said than done. Students are encouraged to follow some basic time management tips to survive this tricky balancing act. (more…)

Posted June 12, 2015 by

What Online Education Means in Today’s World

In the past, the only way to pursue higher education was by physically attending the classroom setting.  However, in the world we live in today, that is not the case.  Online education has afforded anyone and everyone the opportunity to pursue a college degree in their own time and their own space.  With people living very busy lives with work and family, online education offers a chance to have work/life balance.  So, what do the numbers say about online education, and how it can benefit you personally?  Find out in the following infographic. (more…)

Posted April 23, 2015 by

Ten Ways to Improve Education through Technology

An IT classroom laptops on the desks and an interactive white board with blank screens to add your own image or text

An IT classroom with laptops on the desks and an interactive white board with blank screens to add your own image or text. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The past twenty five years have seen huge advances in technology. You only need to look at your current mobile phone with all its apps and features, and then compare it to the brick you were carrying around way back then to see the proof.

Disappointingly however, these advances in technology also have a downside. Children of today are now transfixed with all the computer games, the Internet, social media, iPods, and of course their mobile phones. No longer are children inclined to read a book, play outside with their friends or do the kind of activities that children use to do in previous generations. Furthermore the use of calculators and the spell checker on computers has taken away the very basics that are needed to lay the foundations of a good education, namely basic arithmetic and spelling.

Yet in spite of this, there are benefits to be gained through the use of technology in the educational environment. Most households in non third world countries now have access to a computer. This has been the main contributor to improvements in education, and through its use there are many ways to improve education through technology. (more…)

Posted February 23, 2015 by

How to Become a Certified Motor Vehicle Inspector

Young inspector, business man inspecting car, doing a checklist

Young inspector, business man inspecting car, doing a checklist. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Vehicle inspection agencies only hire qualified individuals. You need to have the right academic qualifications and enough experience. You must also have worked in a related field for at least 5 years. It is advisable to ensure that you have all the required qualifications prior to applying for any post.

The career road map of becoming a certified vehicle inspector requires you to attend various reputable educational and training institutions. You should consult experts in the field or friends who work in the same fields for the ideal leads. (more…)

Posted February 20, 2015 by

How The Use Of Social Media Can Reshape The Education Sector?

Social media concept: text Social Media on green chalkboard on grunge wall background, 3d render

Social media concept: text Social Media on green chalkboard on grunge wall background, 3d render. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

In the last few years, internet has drastically revolutionized the education sector. In addition to this, social media has added more interest by changing communication medium and creating more impact on education. Networking sites like Facebook and Twitter are two chief and largely used mediums to explore and market education. Today, students, professors and education experts can connect with each other through social media medium and create awareness. The rising interest and availability among young students is an undeniable fact. (more…)

Posted January 30, 2015 by

Classroom to Career: Six Steps You Must Take to Get a Rewarding Job

Woman searching newspaper classified ads

Woman searching newspaper classified ads. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

With many students working hard towards getting their degree, some don’t anticipate how difficult it may be to find a job, even with an education. As college grads enter the workforce, they may accept another position until the right one comes along. Following these six steps can help you find a rewarding job after college: (more…)

Posted August 11, 2014 by

From Classroom to Conference Room: Insights and Tips to Getting Hired

Male student with computer taking notes in university class

Male student with computer taking notes in university class. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Walking off the stage after receiving your college diploma can feel a bit like stepping into the void – a vast void of unemployed graduates all hoping to land the best job offer for their chosen field. Some job seekers focus with a laser-like intensity that blocks out opportunities disguised as “poor fits,” while others make it to the interview only to freeze and not communicate their experience and desire for the job.

Just as receiving your degree was the result of discipline, preparation and hard work, so too is the journey to receiving the right job offer. Here are a few insights and tips to help speed your path to the career you’ve worked so hard to launch: (more…)