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Posted May 28, 2016 by

Core advantages of vocational and technical education programs

Engineering photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

There are many purposes served by vocational and technical colleges. These colleges create many opportunities for students to further their professional careers and to earn more money. They also offer many career programs in practical fields that don’t require academic training in traditional four-year programs.

This article will present some core advantages of vocational and technical courses offered by colleges to high school students.

Shortening freshman year

For high school students, the most prominent and motivating factor of enrolling into vocational programs is that they enable students to shorten their freshman year in college. Since the college years are in a traditional four-year degree program, quarters and semesters usually involve credits earned. Students can considerably shorten their freshman year and earn enough college credits during high school. This might add up enough to cut freshman year in half for some.

Winning college credits

It is a fact that high schools do not offer this option. However, there are many vocational and technical colleges that provide entry-level classes to students studying in high schools who have established a good capacity and ability for college education. Usually, this is ascertained through a counselor or mentor who guides students, even though there are some schools that allow high school students to enroll for classes.

Since college level classes are taken by high school students, they are given the chance by vocational and technical programs to start their college education. Usually, students can attend classes at night, after the end of their regular high school duration. The credits won by these programs can be put toward first-year generals at a conventional education center.

Getting used to college years

The environment of a vocational and technical college program is one between high school and college. This approach makes an undeniably perfect learning environment for high school students to become familiar with a different learning experience.

Typically, students want the stress-free and informal learning environment, and they can experience it by enrolling into a vocational program. It is a common fact that high school is usually infamous for being filled with ‘cliques,’ but the college life is more relaxed, as it involves more social aspect and social interaction.

Creating a perfect college application

The college application process for admission is another one of the motivating factors for taking a vocational and technical program during high school. Students want admissions to highly desirable and top-ranking universities, but getting in a college or university is fierce competition. Thus, students will have to do everything to make their college applications the best.

Specialty career programs

The subject matter in specialty courses is one more reason to consider vocational programs during high school. If we talk about the United Kingdom, there are many high schools dropping numerous elective programs and the budget cuts are the main reason behind it. There are many cases in which the first subjects and programs to be dropped are physical activities like shop, band, and physical education.

For students with interests in any of these programs, their only option available is taking them at a vocational college. They can find an extensive array of these vocational programs at most vocational and technical colleges. Plus, the bonus is students will get in-depth and hands on vocational classes they can’t find in high school.

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John Kelly is a professional and proactive article writer, as well as an education counselor. He also provides UK writing help to customers for enhancing their skills and knowledge. He also writes articles for the benefit of students.

Posted April 23, 2016 by

Financial aid secrets for college students

Financial aid web browser sign concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

alexmillos/Shutterstock.com

With graduation season looming, high school seniors throughout the country are receiving their college acceptance letters and celebrating their impending sense of freedom. At the same time, parents are studying financial aid options and scratching their heads trying to figure out how to pay for the upcoming four (or more) years.

As the costs of attending college rise, it’s important to consider scholarships, grants, and student loans to assist with the hefty fees. There are also some innovative tricks that can help reduce this cost. Here are some insights gleaned from real university financial aid employees, parents, and former college students all high school seniors and their families should know.

Use your FAFSA

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is an important financial aid document college students shouldn’t skip. Even if they don’t think they’ll qualify for any money, it’s important to fill this form out annually. This is how the federal government and schools determine what type of aid to give students. There are many subtle things that can impact the grants offered, many of which are unknown to the average person, and may change the amount a family qualifies for.

Attend class

Many universities have strict attendance and truancy policies to prevent abuse of the grants offered. If a student withdraws from a class due to non-attendance in the first few classes or consistent unexplained absences, their course load may drop below the mandatory credits needed to qualify for certain grants. If you have a scholarship or grant already, make sure you know the terms and what’s expected from your end.

Become a Resident Advisor (RA)

Aside from tuition, room and board are the most expensive costs incurred during college. With the average college student paying $8,535 a year just for a place to stay, it makes sense to try to skimp on this fee. Students who work as a Resident Advisor often wind up with free or significantly reduced room and board in exchange for their services, making this one of the most lucrative student jobs available.

Learn to cook

While Top Ramen may be students best friend those first few months, anything prepared at home is bound to be more affordable than college meal plans and eating out at restaurants. Even if a student’s cooking skills need some brushing up, this is one of the easiest ways to save money. Don’t be afraid of the kitchen.

Find freebies

So much of an average college student’s budget is spent on personal expenses, which often includes entertainment. Seek free options available through the university instead. Campuses are loaded with free amenities, from swimming pools and libraries to dorm dinners, guest lecture speakers, and student clubs.

Join a credit union

Since credit unions are run as cooperatives, they can afford giving customers extra perks that wind up saving them a lot of money. They typically feature lower credit card interest rates, higher interest rates paid out on savings accounts, and reduced-fee ATMs and online banking services.

While the term “starving student” has origins in truth, it doesn’t need to be a reality for all. Instead, research financial aid opportunities and spend wisely to save money and stick to a good budget throughout your academic career.

If you’re interested in more information on financial aid, please visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information on first time budgeting, see what a Bountiful Utah Credit Union might recommend. Brooke is available via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Posted August 18, 2015 by

5 Common Myths about College Life

myths word concept

MYTHS word concept. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If you are going to start college then congratulations because you are going to start a new chapter of your life and you have to make sure that you will make the most out of it. The moment that you get accepted into the college of your choice, you cannot help but feel euphoria because it seems surreal.

There is a chance that you have already heard a lot of things about college life and you cannot help but feel a bit scared because you feel that you already know what you want to expect. Are you sure that everything that you have heard is true? What if some of the things that you have learned are just myths? (more…)

Posted July 08, 2015 by

Want a Promotion? 5 Tips to Help You Earn One

Do you believe it is time for you to get promoted at work?  If you have been with a company for a while and have proven your worth, then chances are you are probably right.  You may have even asked your boss for a promotion before, but for some reason it was not the right time.  That does not mean you should give up.  If your goal is to move up within your business, there are ways to do it.  Here are some tips to help you earn a promotion. (more…)

Posted June 17, 2015 by

Work Smart: Tips for Students to Get More out of Their Day

Female student reading a book for finding information. Young woman sitting at table doing assignments in university library.

Female student reading a book for finding information. Young woman sitting at table doing assignments in university library. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Are you working hard in class, racing to your job after school and trying to make it to an extracurricular activity during the week? Working while going to school full time means you have to work smart. Organize your time to squeeze in extra schoolwork between classes, work and fun. Here are few tips to maximize your time: (more…)

Posted June 11, 2015 by

Your advisor is your academic planner: Ask them these 6 things

 

Although many college freshmen don’t think too much about seeing an academic advisor, due to the fact that they have so many other things to adjust to, it’s one of the most important things that they should do within their first few months on campus. You should see your advisor as your academic planner. They know just about everything that’s important about the academic situation at the university: grading systems, courses that lead to specific degrees, and so on. However, they will not seek out students; rather the student needs to be the one to take the initiative. (more…)

Posted May 13, 2015 by

Even if Undergrad Was a Struggle, Grad School is Still Possible

Ryan Hickey

Ryan Hickey, Managing Editor of Peterson’s & EssayEdge

There’s good news and bad news for those who had a rough time in undergrad and are now thinking about graduate studies. The good news is, you are now older and have more experience, so it’s likely you won’t get caught up in the same business that gave you trouble in the first place. The bad news is, you’re going to have to find a way to overshadow any anomalous GPA issues. But let’s start with the most important concern. (more…)

Posted April 13, 2015 by

5 Ways Technology can Help you Do Well in Your College Science Classes

Woman on a laptop computer, working with a group of female university students of computer science, programming code

Woman on a laptop computer, working with a group of female university students of computer science, programming code. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This acronym is used by the U.S. Department of Education when developing policies that will increase U.S. global competitiveness in the field of technology development. It’s been said that science and technology are advancing at such a rapid rate that, as a college student, much of what you’re learning right now may be obsolete by the time you graduate. However, here are some ways that technology is helping students succeed in science classes today, as well as preparing them for the advances of the future. (more…)

Posted January 09, 2015 by

Six Simple Tips to Fit Study around Your Busy Work Life

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

When you are pursuing a degree or diploma, it can sometimes be difficult to find time for all the studying you need to do. Work, family, and your social life can sometimes get in the way of studying for your classes. If you are wondering how to fit in study around your busy work life, follow these six simple tips. (more…)

Posted September 10, 2014 by

Do Employers Care if You’ve Had a “Real” Job? Tips for Making the Most of Non-Traditional Work Experience

Student getting work experience; printing

Student getting work experience; printing. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

You see it in almost every job listing: “Experience required.” Those two little words can be a big problem for college students and recent graduates, many of whom have little to no employment history or professional experience.

It’s a catch-22 for many students and recent grads just entering the job market. After all, how can you start getting job experience, if employers won’t hire you until you have experience? It’s a paradox that adds even more stress to an already hectic time in your life.

But the issue of experience is something that can be solved – or at least worked around. The next time you see an opening for what sounds like your dream job, don’t give up when you see “Experience required.”  Even if you haven’t worked in a traditional setting or gained relevant experience in the field, you probably have some kind of knowledge or skills you can apply to the position. (more…)